Peace thru Strength

(U. S. Navy Aviation Strengths)

U. S. Navy Ship Force Levels

U. S. Destroyer Squadrons

Amphibious Assault Ships - LHD/LHA(R)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIER SHIP

HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peace thru Strength

(U. S. Navy Aviation Strengths)

U. S. Navy Ship Force Levels

U. S. Destroyer Squadrons

Amphibious Assault Ships - LHD/LHA(R)

 

US Ship Force Levels

1886-present

 

This tabulation was compiled from such sources as the Navy Directory (issued at varying intervals to 1941); the Annual Reports of the Secretary of the Navy (issued annually to 1931); Comptroller of the Navy (NAVCOMPT) compilations; Department of the Navy (DON) 5-Year Program, Ships & Aircraft Supplemental Data Tables (SASDT); and records and compilations of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (OP-802K, now N804J1D) Ship Management Information System (now Ship Management System), refined and edited with the assistance of the annual Naval Vessel Register.

For consistent historical comparison, Naval Reserve Force (NRF) and Naval Fleet Auxiliary Force (NFAF) ships, and Military Sealift Command (MSC) fleet support ships, are included in current and recent active totals. Figures, and conclusions drawn from them, would, otherwise, be historically inconsistent, and comparisons would be skewed.

From 1963 through 1974, former guided-missile frigates (DLG/DLGN) are counted under the categories (cruisers, destroyers) to which they were assigned on 30 June 1975: DLG 6 class Became DDG 37 class; DLG 16 class became CG 16 class; DLG 26 class became CG 26 class; DLGN 25, 35, 36 classes became CGN 25, 35, 36 classes.

Surface warfare ship totals do not include submarines, mine warfare, patrol or auxiliaries.

 

TABLES:

 

1886-1891 | 1892-1897 | 1898-1903 | 1904-1909 | 1910-1916 | 1917-1923 |
1924-1930 | 1931-1937 | 1938-1944 | 1945-1951 | 1951-1957 | 1958-1964 | 
1965-1971 | 1972-1978 | 1979-1985 | 1986-1992 | 1993-1999 | 2000-present 

 

U. S. Navy Ship Force Levels, 1886-1891

 

DATE

12/86

12/87

12/88

12/89

12/90

12/91

BATTLESHIP

 

 

 

 

 

 

CRUISER*

1

2

2

4

7

8

MONITOR

 

 

 

 

 

1

TORPEDO BOATS

 

 

 

 

1

1

STEEL GUNBOATS**

1

1

1

4

5

7

AUXILIARIES

 

 

 

 

 

1

SCREW STEAMER***

13

13

13

13

11

10

SCREW SLOOPS^

14

14

14

14

10

10

GUNBOATS~

5

5

5

5

5

5

SAILING VESSELS@

4

4

4

3

3

3

STEEL NAVY

2

3

3

8

13

18

NOTES

*   Mostly protected cruisers plus two armored cruisers and three unprotected cruisers.

** Although not a gunboat, the steel-hulled despatch boat Dolphin was part of the "New Navy". The great increase in numbers after 1897 includes new building, conversions, and war prizes.

***All wooden or iron ships until 1898 when the wartime expansion included eleven merchant ships temporarily converted to auxiliary cruisers.

^    Includes one steam sloop and one steam sloop-of-war.

~    Includes wooden, composite, and iron gunboats.

@    Includes one sloop-of-war and three training ships.

$    The distinction between "Old" Navy and "Steel" Navy is somewhat artificial, the former being the old iron-hulled vessels with early steam engines, while the latter term covers (with a few exceptions) the new steel-hulled triple-expansion steam engine warships that become the standard ships of 20th-century navies.

EVENTS

•     U. S. authorized first vessels of the "steel navy" in 1883 and 1885. 

•     First battleship (pre-dreadnought) authorized in 1886. 

•     Publication of Alfred Thayer Mahan's widely read but often misunderstood The Influence of Sea Power Upon History in 1890.

 

U. S. Navy Ship Force Levels, 1892-1897 

 

DATE

12/92

12/93

12/94

12/95

12/96

12/97

BATTLESHIP

 

 

 

3

5

6

CRUISER

8

9

16

17

16

16

MONITOR

1

2

2

3

6

6

TORPEDO BOATS

1

1

1

1

1

6

STEEL GUNBOATS

7

9

10

10

11

14

AUXILIARIES#

1

1

1

1

1

1

SCREW STEAMER

9

7

7

7

7

7

SCREW SLOOPS

8

7

6

6

6

5

GUNBOATS

5

5

5

5

5

10

SAILING VESSELS

3

2

2

2

1

1

STEEL NAVY

18

22

30

35

40

49

OLD NAVY

25

21

20

20

19

23

TOTAL ACTIVE

43

43

50

55

59

72

NOTES

•First three battleships commissioned in 1895.

 

U. S. Navy Ship Force Levels, 1898-1903 

 

DATE

12/98

12/99

12/00

12/01

12/02

12/03

BATTLESHIP

6

5

8

9

10

11

CRUISER

18

15

13

9

16

19

MONITOR

14

6

5

6

6

6

DESTROYERS

 

 

 

 

8

16

TORPEDO BOATS

12

15

18

24

27

27

SUBMARINES

 

 

1*

1

1

8

STEEL GUNBOATS

34**

28

30

29

29

29

AUXILIARIES#

30

26

25

25

26

26

SCREW STEAMER

16

13

11

10

9

9

SCREW SLOOPS

4

4

3

3

3

2

SAILING SHIPS

1

1***

 

 

 

 

GUNBOATS @@

25

20

26

25

25

22

STEEL NAVY

114

95

100

103

123

142

OLD NAVY

46

38

40

38

37

33

TOTAL ACTIVE

160

133

140

141

160

175

DATE

12/98

12/99

12/00

12/01

12/02

12/03

EVENTS

•Spanish-American War, April-August 1898.

•First submarine enters service in 1900.  First torpedo boat destroyers enter service in 1902.

NOTES

*    Holland, although technically a submersible torpedo boat, was the first of some 500 or so diesel-electric boats commonly referred to as "submarines."

***    About 20 steel ships, converted to gunboats, were bought by the Navy in 1898 because of the war with Spain.

#    Before the Spanish-American War, this category included the small freight carrier Fern.  For the wartime period and after, it covers colliers, supply ships, water supply ships, a transport, a hospital ship, and a refrigerator ship.

*** By the turn of the century, the only active sailing ship left in the Navy (the rest had become stationary receiving or training ships or had been transferred to State Militias or Marine Schools) was the bark Severn, used to train midshipmen at the Naval Academy in Annapolis.  The category is therefore closed.

@@    Twenty-three converted yachts, fourteen revenue cutters transferred from the Treasury Department, war prizes, and conversions of private craft temporarily increased the number of non-steel "gunboats" in the Navy during and after 1898.

 

U. S. Navy Ship Force Levels, 1904-1909 

 

DATE

12/04

12/05

12/06

12/07

12/08

12/09

BATTLESHIP

12

12

18

22

25

25

CRUISER

23

24

27

25

27

27

MONITOR

5

4

4

4

2

2

DESTROYERS

16

16

16

16

16

20

TORPEDO BOATS*

29

32

32

32

33

33

SUBMARINES

8

8

8

11

12

16

STEEL GUNBOATS

29

28

25

22

20

19

AUXILIARIES

28

27

29

30

30

29

SCREW STEAMER

4

4

2**

 

 

 

SCREW SLOOPS

2***

 

 

 

 

 

GUNBOATS

21

19

19

18

16

16

TOTAL ACTIVE

177

174

180

180

181

187

NOTES

*     A number of torpedo boats went in and out of commission during this time period, often seeing service with reserve units or State Militias.  Most, however, came back into the Navy in 1917 and therefore remain on the list.

**     By 1906, all the screw steamers had either decommissioned or had become station ships, tenders, trainers, or auxiliaries, thus this category is closed down.

***     After 1904, the remaining two sloops, Hartford and Mohican, only served as training or station ships, thus closing down this category.

****     By 1906, the distinction between old and steel navy is no longer useful.

 

Former Congressman West said our Navy was at 1915 levels. In 1922 the first aircraft carrier was built using the USS Jupiter, the first electric ship using coal, thereafter becoming USS Langley and as of October 23, 2012 we have eleven aircraft carriers, while USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was inactivated on 1 December 2012.

 

USS George H.W. Bush is the 10th and final Nimitz-class aircraft carrier. Commissioned Saturday, Jan. 10, 2009, during an 11 a.m. EST ceremony at Naval Station Norfolk, Va. The 41st President of the United States George H. W. Bush christened the CVN-77 at the christening ceremony at Northrop Grumman Newport News Shipyard on 7 October 2006. The Island lifted into place on 8 July 2006. On 26 January 2001, Newport News Ship building signed a $3.8 billion deal with the Navy to build CVN-77. Keel was laid down on 6 September 2003. The Navy took delivery of its newest aircraft carrier, USS George H.W. Bush (CVN-77), from Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding May 11.

 

The Gerald R. Ford-class aircraft carrier will be 1,092 feet in length and have a beam of 134 feet. The flight deck will be 256 feet wide, and the ship will be able to operate at speeds in excess of 34 knots. Enterprise will be built by Huntington Ingalls Industries-Newport News Shipbuilding in Newport News, Va. “The Navy awarded Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding a $5.1 billion contract to begin construction of the Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78) on 10 September 2008. The keel laying and authentication ceremony for Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78) was held at Northrop Grumman Corp.'s Newport News shipyard on 14 November 2009. USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78) launched, holding a Christening ceremony at Huntington Ingalls Newport News Shipbuilding in Newport News on 9 November 2013.

 

Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78) (66th CC) will replace USS Nimitz (CVN-68), former CVA(N)-68  (56th CC) in 2016 or 2017.

 

As of July 8, 2016, there are ten commissioned aircraft carriers.

 

In addition, several carriers are under going DPIA or PIA from 6 to 12 months annually.

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) (60th CC) will complete RCOH in 2016 and USS George Washington (CVN-73) (61st CC) will commence RCOH.

 

Today the U. S. Navy has more ships then America had in 1915.

 

Before WW II the U.S. Navy had fewer carriers then today and we have submarines as well, so what does Congressman West mean when he says our Navy is at 1915 levels?

 

Where did this idea originate that there were more U. S. Navy Ships in 1915 then 2012?

 

910 to 1916 (245) & 2012 (287) Deployable Battle Force of U. S. Navy Ships

 

U. S. Navy Ship Force Levels, 1910-1916 

 

Date

12/10

12/11

12/12

12/13

12/14

12/15

12/16

Battleship

29

30

32

32

34

32

36

Cruiser

27

25

24

27

28

30

30

Monitor

2

3

3

3

3

3

3

Destroyers

27

36

42

46

50

57

61

Torpedo Boats*

31

30

30

25

19

18

18

Submarines

17

17

23

26

36

37

44

Steel Gunboats

18

18

17

17

17

17

17**

Auxiliaries

29

28

28

27

26

26

25

Gunboats

16

15

12

11

11

11

11**

Total Active

196

202

211

214

224

231

245

 

*A number of torpedo boats went in and out of commission during this time period, often seeing service with reserve units or State Militias.  Most, however, came back into the Navy in 1917 and therefore remain on the list.

 

**These two categories are merged together with the great wartime expansion of gunboat numbers in 1917. Not Active.

http://www.history.navy.mil/branches/org9-4b.htm#1910

 

I think Congressman West was refereeing to 1917 ship forces and or the result of 700 billion in military cuts which would force a number of ships to decommission.

 

In the 20’s and 30’s there was a new construction ship tonnage treaty between the U. S. and other industrial nations that WW II changed, yet in 1917 there was a 342 U. S. Navy Active Ship Force Level as Mit Romney pointed out as compared to 287 as of 23 October 2012.

 

U. S. Navy Active Ship Force Levels, 1917-1923

 

Date

4/6/17

11/11/18

7/1/19

7/1/20

7/1/21

7/1/22

7/1/23

Battleship

37

39

36

26

22

19

18

Monitors, Coastal

7

7

5

1

2@

-

-

Carriers, Fleet

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Carriers, Escort

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Cruisers

33

31

28

27

10

12

13

Destroyers

66

110

161

189

68 (208rc )

103

103

Frigates

17

17

-

-

-

-

-

Submarines

44

80

91

58

69 (11rc)

82 (7rc)

69 (5rc)

Mine Warfare

-

53

62

48

50 (8rc)

36

38

Patrol

42

350

65

45

59 (1rc)

43

41

Auxiliary

96

87

304

173

104

83

82

Surface Warships

160

204

230

243

102

134

134

Total Active

342

774

752

567

384 (228rc)

379 (7rc)

365 (5rc)

Events

•    U.S. enters WWI 6 April 1917

•    Bolshevik Revolution begins 28 October (Old Style) 1917

    WWI ends 11 November 1918

•    Washington Treaty in force 17 August 1923

Notes

@   The last Coast Defense Monitor went out of commission in 1921.

rc    Reduced Commission: not included in "active" total. The drop in ship numbers evident from 1920-21 is a post-WWI readjustment to a peacetime strength, with limited budgets and naval arms limitation. Not Active.

http://www.history.navy.mil/branches/org9-4.htm

 

U. S. Navy Active Ship Force Levels, 2007 to 2011

 

Date

9/30/07

9/30/08

9/30/09

9/30/10

9/30/11

Carriers

11

11

11 

11

11

Cruisers

22

22

22 

22

22

Destroyers

52

54

57

59

61

Frigates

30

30

30

29

26

LCS *

 

1

1

2

2

Submarines

53

53

53 

53

53

SSBN

14

14

14

14

14

SSGN

4

4

4

4

Mine Warfare

14

14

14 

14

14

Amphibious

33

34

33

33

31

Auxiliary

46

45

46

47

47

Surface Warships

115

118

 121

 123

122 

Total Active

278**

282

285 

288 

285 

Notes

    Cost increases encourage construction of more affordable class of littoral combat ships, intended for inshore or 'brown water' operations in high risk environments.

*   Littoral Combat Ship

** Low since 19th-century

 

U. S. Navy Active Ship Force Levels, 2007 to 2012

 

DATE

9/30/07

9/30/08

9/30/09

9/30/10

9/30/11

9/30/12

CARRIERS

11

11

11 

11

11

11

CRUISERS

22

22

22 

22

22

22

DESTROYERS

52

54

57

59

61

62

FRIGATES

30

30

30

29

26

23

LCS

 

1

1

2

2

3

PATROL COASTAL

0

0

0

0

0

0

 SSN

53

53

53 

53

53

54

SSBN

14

14

14

14

14

14

SSGN

4

4

4

4

4

MINE WARFARE

14

14

14 

14

14

14

AMPHIBIOUS

33

34

33

33

31

29

AUXILIARY

46

45

46

47

47

52

SURFACE WARSHIPS

115

118

 121

 123

122 

121

TOTAL ACTIVE

278

282

285 

288 

285 

288

 

 

 

U. S. Navy Active Ship Force Levels, 2007 to 2015

 

DATE

9/30/07

9/30/08

9/30/09

9/30/10

9/30/11

9/30/12

CARRIERS

11

11

11 

11

11

11

CRUISERS

22

22

22 

22

22

22

DESTROYERS

52

54

57

59

61

62

FRIGATES

30

30

30

29

26

23

LCS

 

1

1

2

2

3

PATROL COASTAL

0

0

0

0

0

0

 SSN

53

53

53 

53

53

54

SSBN

14

14

14

14

14

14

SSGN

4

4

4

4

4

MINE WARFARE

14

14

14 

14

14

14

AMPHIBIOUS

33

34

33

33

31

29

AUXILIARY

46

45

46

47

47

52

SURFACE WARSHIPS

115

118

 121

 123

122 

121

TOTAL ACTIVE

278

282

285 

288 

285 

288

^ Patrol Coastal (PC) were counted in the battle force level only for FY 2014.

Published: Wed Jan 13 09:46:02 EST 2016

https://www.history.navy.mil/research/histories/ship-histories/us-ship-force-levels.html

 

The Navy Fact File contains descriptions of the roles and characteristics of Navy ships.

The make-up of a
Carrier Strike Group (CSG)

The make-up of a Carrier Air Wing (CVW)

The make-up of an Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG)

Navy Personnel

 

U. S. Navy Ship Force Levels (October 23, 2012 & July 8, 2016)

 

Description

10/23/12

07/08/16

Increase

Decrease

Navy Personnel

Active Duty

321,053

329,647

8,594

N/A

Officers

52,694

54,861

2,167

N/A

Enlisted

263,892

271,449

7,557

N/A

Midshipmen

4,467

3,337

N/A

1,130

Ready Reserve

108,718 [As of Sep 2012 ]

106,663 [As of May 2016]

N/A

2,055

Selected Reserves

64,715

57,542

N/A

7,153

Individual Ready Reserve

44,003

49,121

N/A

5,118

Reserves currently mobilized

4,535 [As of 16 Oct 2012]

2,894 [As of June 2016]

N/A

1,641

Navy Department Civilian Employees

 

208,887

N/A

N/A

Ships and Submarines

Deployable Battle Force Ships

287

276

N/A

11

Ships Deployed

114 (40%)

43 (16%)

N/A

71

Ships Underway for Local Ops / Training (USFF / 3rd Fleet)

56 (19%)

81 (30%)

25

 

 

N/A

Ships Underway

Aircraft Carriers / Amphibious Assault Ships

Aircraft (operational): 3700+

http://www.navy.mil/navydata/nav_legacy.asp?id=146

 

The Navy positioned it self to loose 3,000 aviation personnel in October 2012. Recruiting pilots and personnel rather then eliminating personnel in able to be assigned to forward deployed squadrons working in conjunction with no more then two battle groups on station in up to three Theaters of Operations at any given time any where in the world, with four carriers stateside and one refueling and overhaul seems reasonable.

 

More squadrons mean more pilots but that’s cheaper then three carriers on station in my view, something I don’t like to see unless in peace time conducting training operations.

 

Why?

 

With limited resources, few ship squadrons, air wings and submarines, to engage three Theaters of Operations for any length of time would be tough unless reservists were recalled and the U. S. would have to rely on the U. S. Allies Navies military personnel and assets.

List of current ships of the United States Navy

 

There are more than 430 ships believed to be in active service with the United States Navy, on reserve, or under construction, based on public reports compiled in this list. The U.S. Navy is the largest in the world; its battle fleet tonnage is greater than that of the next 13 largest navies combined. This list available at the free encyclopedia includes both U.S. Navy owned and leased ships; both ships that are formally commissioned and other ships that are used by the U.S. Navy without the ceremony of commissioning. In addition, some planned ships are listed as well.

 

All evidences for the following strengths of the U.S. Navy’s Aviation related assets are on this web site while every web site address was verified and history presented was reviewed by the EQNEEDF, whom researched, compiled, rewrote and published all authorship presented for public awareness and education.

 

If this work gains the U.S. Navy one ship, one plane, a training aircraft carrier stationed in Florida or more forward deployed Marine and Navy Helicopter and Aircraft Squadrons by giving the American People the facts about the Navy’s Strength, so they can contact and influence elected officials to give the Navy and her service members hope, I will have honored those who have served, serving and one day will serve.

 

So what are you waiting for, write that letter.

 

The U.S. Navy does not kneel before Kings, as shouted by John Paul Jones in the heat of battle, “I have not yet begun to Fight,” but the Navy does render hand salutes, canyon ball and rifle fire out of respect for dignitaries and Admirals.

 

John Paul Jones was with the commands of the USS Missouri (BB-63) ("Mighty Mo" or "Big Mo") during World War II, Korea and Vietnam in spirit as sailors embrace tradition, honor and courage serving any where in the world aboard ship’s and shore commands, operating both ships and aircraft both for war and humanitarian services.

 

 

 

 

http://www.navweaps.com/index_tech/tech-022_Missouri_pic.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.navweaps.com/index_tech/tech-022.htm&h=427&w=738&sz=34&tbnid=wWMtCxgegxJ2ZM:&tbnh=90&tbnw=156&prev=/search%3Fq%3Duss%2Bmissouri%2Bbattleship%2Bfiring%2Bher%2Bguns%26tbm%3Disch%26tbo%3Du&zoom=1&q=uss+missouri+battleship+firing+her+guns&usg=__TVVxPWXc4077k6KxRW8qnHSGAT0=&docid=1m1UWEV6SVWPGM&hl=en&sa=X&ei=KWBbUI-3NobgiwKDv4GoAQ&ved=0CDgQ9QEwBA&dur=899

 

The CIC however shows his respect for Kings in a manner that demonstrates the President of America is lost in his own deception of how to represent a nation, or govern the affairs of our country, in my view, while as a man, bowing before anyone to include a King would be the business of the individual.

 

I know if I was ever in the position to visit with a King, I’d nod my head down quickly, never loosing eye sight. As a President I’d look right into his eyes and say your either with us your not, and if not, let me know now, so I can say good day to you Sir. Then I’d split. If the King was a friend to America I’d shake his hand, but I’d never loose eye sight, express my countries desires/concerns and move forward.

 

 

Obama Bows to Saudi King - YouTube

 

President Obama is fighting for his version of hope and change in his idealist utopia of redistribution of wealth. Well I’m poor, broke, in debt and trying to make it by the day, but I’m not looking for crumbs or handouts, nor will I pledge allegiance to Obama’s Flag and New World Order.

 

The U. S. Navy thankfully is still flying old blood and guts.

 

But since President Obama is the CIC, if he wants to ware a hat with his flag on it rather then the American Flag. I guess he has the authority to do so. Look at your CIC’s new Flag my fellow service members whom no one went out of there way to make sure you could vote for hope and change.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9WlqW6UCeaY

 

http://radio.foxnews.com/toddstarnes/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/obama11.jpg

http://radio.foxnews.com/toddstarnes/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/obama11.jpg

 

U.S. Destroyer Squadrons

 

Squadrons

Pacific

Atlantic

Middle East

Destroyer Squadron 1

P

 

 

Destroyer Squadron 2

 

A

 

Destroyer Squadron 6

 

A

 

Destroyer Squadron 9

P

 

 

Destroyer Squadron 14

 

A

 

Destroyer Squadron 15

P (7th Flt.)

 

 

Destroyer Squadron 18

P

 

 

Destroyer Squadron 21

P

 

 

Destroyer Squadron 22

 

A

 

Destroyer Squadron 23

P

 

 

Destroyer Squadron 26

 

A

 

Destroyer Squadron 28

 

A

 

Destroyer Squadron 40

 

A (4th Flt.)

 

Destroyer Squadron 50

 

 

Middle East

Battle Force Fifth Fleet (CTF-50)

 

6

7

1

DESRON FIFTEEN is the Navy's only forward deployed Destroyer Squadron and is responsible for the readiness, tactical and administrative responsibilities for seven Arleigh Burke Class Destroyers.

Destroyer Squadron 23 (Pacific) Destroyer Squadron 23 is a flotilla of United States Navy destroyers and frigates based out of San Diego, California”(Ref. 685S).

 

List of cruiser-destroyer groups – Ref. 937

U.S. Atlantic Fleet

 

· Cruiser-Destroyer Group 2 (former CruDesFlot 2) - Carrier Strike Group Two (formerly CarGru 2) - Two, (CSG-2 or CARSTRKGRU 2) is a U.S. Navy carrier strike group. U.S. Navy carrier strike groups are employed in a variety of roles, all of which involve gaining and maintaining sea control as well as projecting naval airpower ashore. http://www.navy.mil/navydata/ships/carriers/powerhouse/cvbg.asp. The aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN-77) is the strike group's current flagship, and as of 2012, other units assigned to Carrier Strike Group Two include Carrier Air Wing Eight; the guided-missile cruisers USS Vella Gulf (CG-72), USS Monterey (CG-61), and USS Leyte Gulf (CG-55); and the ships of Destroyer Squadron 22:[7] USS Truxtun (DDG-103), USS Nitze (DDG-94), USS Mason (DDG-87), USS McFaul (DDG-74), USS Mahan (DDG-72), USS Cole (DDG-67), and USS Elrod (FFG-55); Naval Station Norfolk.

· Cruiser-Destroyer Group 4 - had USS Tidewater (AD-31) as flagship from 10 September to 13 November 1970

· Cruiser-Destroyer Group 8 (former CruDesFlot 8)

· Cruiser-Destroyer Group 10 (former CruDesFlot 10). USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) is the strike group's current flagship, and as of 2012, other units assigned to Carrier Strike Group Ten include Carrier Air Wing Three embarked on board the Harry S. Truman, the guided-missile cruiser Antietam, and Destroyer Squadron 26

· Cruiser-Destroyer Group 12 (former CruDesFlot 12, re-designated 30 June 1973)

· Carrier Strike Group Fourteen, designated CSG-14 or CARSTRKGRU 14, is one of five U.S. Navy carrier strike groups currently assigned the United States Fleet Forces Command. Carrier Strike Group Fourteen is currently the only U.S. carrier strike group that does not have an assigned aircraft carrier or carrier air wing.[4] Instead, as of December 2010, it directs the cruisers USS Gettysburg and USS Philippine Sea (CG-58). Carrier Strike Group Fourteen is currently based at Naval Station Mayport. Without a carrier flagship, it does not conduct the typical deployments of other carrier strike groups; instead, its two cruisers making independent voyages. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carrier_Strike_Group_Fourteen

· Carrier Strike Group Four - Became Commander Strike Force Training Atlantic between July 2005 and February 2006

· Carrier Strike Group 6 (formerly CarGru 6) - USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67); CVW-17; Naval Station Mayport, Florida

· Carrier Strike Group Eight (formerly CarGru 8) - USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69); DESRON-28; Carrier Air Wing Seven; Naval Station Norfolk

· Carrier Strike Group Ten (formerly CCDG 2) - USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75); DESRON-26; Carrier Air Wing Three; Naval Station Norfolk

· Carrier Strike Group Twelve (formerly CCDG 8) - USS Enterprise (CVN-65); DESRON-2; Carrier Air Wing One; Naval Station Norfolk

Carrier Strike Group Fourteen (formerly CCDG 12) - Naval Station Mayport

List of cruiser-destroyer groups – Ref. 937

U.S. Pacific Fleet

· Cruiser-Destroyer Group 1 or ComCruDesGru 1 (redesignated Carrier Strike Group Fifteen on 1 October 2004)/USS Constellation Battle Group: USS Lake Erie and USS Chosin)/ USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70); DESRON-1; Carrier Air Wing Seventeen; NAS North Island.

· Cruiser-Destroyer Group 3 or ComCruDesGru 3 (former CruDesFlot 11//USS Abraham Lincoln Battle Group: USS Princeton and USS Chancellorsville)/USS Carl Vinson Battle Group: USS Shiloh, USS California and USS Arkansas) Carrier Strike Group Three (formerly CarGru 3); USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74); DESRON-21; Carrier Air Wing Nine; Naval Base Kitsap.

· Cruiser-Destroyer Group 5 or ComCruDesGru 5 (former CruDesFlot 9/Nimitz, the guided-missile cruiser Princeton, and Destroyer Squadron 23)/USS Kitty Hawk Battle Group: USS Cowpens and USS Antietam). Commander Carrier Group Five/Carrier Strike Group 5, (CSG-5 or CARSTRKGRU 5), is a U.S. Navy carrier strike group assigned to the Pacific Fleet operating with the 7th Fleet forward Deployed. The aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN-73) is the group's flagship(former /USS Independence Battle Group: USS Bunker Hill and USS Mobile Bay). As of 2012, other group components include Carrier Air Wing Five, USS Shiloh (CG-67), USS Cowpens (CG-63), and the ships of Destroyer Squadron 15.. The group is based at U.S. Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Yokosuka, Japan; a U.S. carrier has been based there since 1973. The group also fulfills the functions of Battle Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 70) and Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75). http://www.ccsg5.navy.mil

· Carrier Strike Group Seven (formerly CarGru 7) - USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76); Destroyer Squadron 7; Carrier Air Wing Fourteen; Naval Air Station North Island

· Carrier Strike Group Nine (formerly Cruiser-Destroyer Group 3 or ComCruDesGru 3 (former CruDesFlot 11//USS Abraham Lincoln Battle Group: USS Princeton and USS Chancellorsville)/USS Carl Vinson Battle Group: USS Shiloh, USS California and USS Arkansas) Carrier Strike Group Three (formerly CarGru 3); USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74); DESRON-21; Carrier Air Wing Nine; Naval Base Kitsap.

· Cruiser-Destroyer Group 5 or ComCruDesGru 5 (former CruDesFlot 9/Nimitz, the guided-missile cruiser Princeton, and Destroyer Squadron 23)/USS Kitty Hawk Battle Group: USS Cowpens and USS Antietam). Commander Carrier Group Five/ Carrier Strike Group 5, (CSG-5 or CARSTRKGRU 5), is a U.S. Navy carrier strike group assigned to the Pacific Fleet operating with the 7th Fleet forward Deployed. The aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN-73) is the group's flagship(former /USS Independence Battle Group: USS Bunker Hill and USS Mobile Bay). As of 2012, other group components include Carrier Air Wing Five, USS Shiloh (CG-67), USS Cowpens (CG-63), and the ships of Destroyer Squadron 15.. The group is based at U.S. Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Yokosuka, Japan; a U.S. carrier has been based there since 1973. The group also fulfills the functions of Battle Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 70) and Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75). http://www.ccsg5.navy.mil

· Carrier Strike Group Eleven (formerly CCDG 5) - USS Nimitz (CVN-68); DESRON-23; Carrier Air Wing Eleven; NAS North Island

· Carrier Strike Group Fifteen (formerly CCDG 1) - USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) - Disestablished 21 March 2005 - Pacific coast

 

“Currently USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) does not have an embarked CSG since the carrier is currently going through its Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)” (Ref. 937 & 937B).

 

“Carrier Strike Group Four was redesignated alongside the other groups in 2004, but has since been redesignated Commander Strike Force Training Atlantic. Carrier Strike Group Six was established from Carrier Group Six with USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) at Naval Station Mayport in 2004, but seems to have since been disestablished. Carrier Strike Group Fifteen has been disestablished, and its flagship, the carrier Ronald Reagan, was re-assigned to Carrier Strike Group Seven” (Ref. 937).

 

“On 1 August 2011, the U.S. Navy announced that Carrier Strike Group Nine will change its permanent duty station from Naval Station Everett to Naval Base San Diego effective 14 December 2012. The aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) will be re-assigned as the flagship for Carrier Strike Group Nine following the de-activation of Carrier Strike Group Seven. Abraham Lincoln will shift its homeport from Everett, Washington, to Newport News, Virginia, for its Refueling and Complex Overhaul in August 2012” (Ref. 937 & 937A).

 

“The deactivation of Carrier Strike Group Seven effective 30 December 2011 reflects the U.S. Navy's future budgetary reductions and the reduced availability of its operational carrier fleet and carrier air wings” (Ref. 937; 937C & 937D).

 

Several Amphibious ships in addition to those operating presently should be under construction.

 

Amphibious Assault Ships - LHD/LHA(R)

 

The largest of all amphibious warfare ships; resembles a small aircraft carrier; capable of Vertical/Short Take-Off and Landing (V/STOL), Short Take-Off Vertical Landing (STOVL), Vertical Take-Off and Landing (VTOL) tilt-rotor and Rotary Wing (RW) aircraft operations; contains a well deck to support use of Landing Craft, Air Cushioned (LCAC) and other watercraft (with exception of the first two LHA(R) class ships, LHA-6 and LHA-7, which have no well deck). LHA-8 will feature a well deck.

 

Features


Modern U.S. Navy Amphibious Assault Ships project power and maintain presence by serving as the cornerstone of the Amphibious Readiness Group (ARG)/Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG). A key element of the Sea Power 21 pillars of Sea Strike and Sea Basing, these ships transport and land elements of the Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) or Marine Expeditionary Brigade (MEB) with a combination of aircraft and landing craft.

The
America-class LHAs and Wasp-class LHDs provide the Marine Corps with a means of ship-to-shore movement by helicopter in addition to movement by landing craft. LHAs (and later LHDs) have been participants in major humanitarian-assistance, occupation and combat operations in which the United States has been involved. Such operations have included participating as launch platforms for Marine Corps expeditionary forces into Afghanistan during Operation Enduring Freedom in 2001 and 2002, Iraq in Operation Iraqi Freedom in 2003 and humanitarian support after the catastrophic Tsunami in 2004. During Operation Iraqi Freedom, two LHDs served as "Harrier carriers," launching an air group of AV-8B attack aircraft against targets inside Iraq. In 2004, LHDs were used to transport thousands of Marines and their equipment to Iraq and Afghanistan for combat operations. Post Hurricane Katrina support was provided in New Orleans by LHD-7 (Iwo Jima) where thousands of police, fire and rescue personnel were hosted onboard during recovery operations and Iwo Jima operated as the central command and control hub.

USS Makin Island (LHD-8) was delivered to the Navy in April 2009 and is the first U.S. Navy amphibious assault ship to be equipped with both gas turbines and an Auxiliary Propulsion System (APS) instead of steam boilers. The APS uses two induction-type Auxiliary Propulsion Motors (APM) powered from the ship's electrical grid rather than relying on main propulsion engines to power the ship's shaft, which are less efficient at lower speeds. Instead of using its gas turbines, which are less efficient at lower speeds, the ship will be able to use its APS for roughly 75 percent of the time the ship is underway. The entire propulsion and electric system is controlled by a comprehensive machinery control system that also controls and monitors damage control, ballasting and de-ballasting, fuel fill and auxiliary machinery. The machinery control system allows the ship to switch from gas turbine to electric propulsion on the fly. It is fully distributed, accessible from multiple locations, and every console provides full system control and monitoring capabilities of the entire engineering plant.

USS America (LHA-6), along with the future USS Tripoli (LHA-7) are LHD variants optimized for aviation capability. The propulsion plant and electrical distribution and auxiliary systems designed and built for USS Makin Island are also used aboard USS America and USS Tripoli, the first ships in the LHA Replacement program. USS America was delivered to the U.S. Navy on April 10, 2014 and USS Tripoli is currently under construction at Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) in Pascagoula, MS and is expected to join the fleet in 2018. LHA-6 and LHA-7, commonly referred to as Flight 0 ships, contain key differences from the LHD class to include: an enlarged hangar deck, enhanced aviation maintenance facilities, increased aviation fuel capacity, additional aviation storerooms, removal of the well deck, and an electronically reconfigurable C4ISR suite. LHA 8, which will be the first Flight I ship, will reincorporate a well deck to increase operational flexibility. The USS America (LHA-6) class ships replace the original five Tarawa-class LHAs, which have all been decommissioned. USS Belleau Wood (LHA-3) was decommissioned in October 2005, followed by USS Saipan (LHA-2) in April 2007, USS Tarawa (LHA-1) in March 2009, USS Nassau (LHA-4) in March 2011 and USS Peleliu (LHA-5) in March 2015.

Amphibious Warfare Ship: Prepared in War or in Peace

 

Background


Amphibious warships are designed to support the Marine Corps tenets of Operational Maneuver From the Sea (OMFTS) and Ship to Objective Maneuver (STOM). They must be capable of sailing in harm's way and enable rapid combat power buildup ashore in the face of opposition. Because of their inherent capabilities, these ships have been and will continue to be called upon to also support humanitarian and other contingency missions on short notice. The United States maintains the largest and most capable amphibious force in the world.

The
Wasp-class LHDs are currently the largest amphibious ships in the world. The lead ship, USS Wasp (LHD-1) was commissioned in July 1989 in Norfolk, Va. The delivery of LHA Replacement or LHA(R) America class ships is the next step in the incremental development of the "Big Deck Amphib." American-class ships are designed to accommodate the Marine Corps' future Air Combat Element (ACE) including F-35B Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) and MV-22 Osprey with additional aviation maintenance capability and increased fuel capacities, while also providing additional cargo stowage capacities and enabling a broader, more flexible Command and Control capability.

 

Program Status


LHDs 1-8 and LHA-6 are in service. The Navy awarded a contract for detail design and construction for LHA-7 (T) to HII on May 31, 2012. The ship started fabrication on July 15, 2013. LHA 8 is programmed as a fiscal year 2017 ship.

 

Point Of Contact


Office of Corporate Communication (SEA 00D)
Naval Sea Systems Command
Washington, D.C. 20376

 

General Characteristics, LHA(R) Class LHA (6)

Builder: Huntington Ingalls Industries Inc., Ingalls Operations, Pascagoula, Miss.

Date Deployed: Delivered to the fleet in on April 10, 2014.

Propulsion: Two marine gas turbines, two shafts, 70,000 total brake horsepower, two 5,000 horsepower auxiliary propulsion motors.

Length: 844 feet (257.3 meters).

Beam: 106 feet (32.3 meters).

Displacement: Approximately 43,745 long tons full load (44,449 metric tons).

Speed: 20+ knots.

Crew: 1,059 (65 officers)

Load: 1,687 troops (plus 184 surge).

Armament: Two RAM launchers; two NATO Sea Sparrow launchers (with Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile (ESSM)); two 20mm Phalanx CIWS mounts; seven twin .50 cal. machine guns.

Aircraft: A mix of: F-35B Joint Strike Fighters (JSF) STOVL aircraft; MV-22 Osprey VTOL tiltrotors; CH-53E Sea Stallion helicopters; UH-1Y Huey helicopters; AH-1Z Super Cobra helicopters; MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopters.

Ships:

USS America (LHA-6), San Diego, CA

PCU Tripoli (LHA-7), No homeport, under construction

General Characteristics, Wasp Class

Builder: Northrop Grumman Ship Systems Ingalls Operations, Pascagoula, MS.

Date Deployed: July 29, 1989 (USS Wasp)

Propulsion: (LHDs 17) two boilers, two geared steam turbines, two shafts, 70,000 total brake horsepower; (LHD 8) two gas turbines, two shafts; 70,000 total shaft horsepower, two 5,000 horsepower auxiliary propulsion motors

Length: 844 feet (253.2 meters)

Beam: 106 feet (31.8 meters)

Displacement: LHDs 1-4: 40,650 tons full load (41,302.3 metric tons)
LHDs 5-7: 40,358 tons full load (41,005.6 metric tons)
LHD-8: 41,772 tons full load (42,442.3 metric tons)

Speed: 20+ knots (23.5+ miles per hour)

Crew: Ships Company: 66 officers, 1,004 enlisted
LHD-8: 65 officers, 994 enlisted
Marine Detachment: 1,687 troops (plus 184 surge)

Armament: Two RAM launchers; two NATO Sea Sparrow launchers; three 20mm Phalanx CIWS mounts (two on LHD 5-8); four .50 cal. machine guns; four 25 mm Mk 38 machine guns (LHD 5-8 have three 25 mm Mk 38 machine guns)

Aircraft: 12 CH-46 Sea Knight helicopters; 4 CH-53E Sea Stallion helicopters; 6 AV-8B Harrier attack aircraft; 3 UH-1N Huey helicopters; 4 AH-1W Super Cobra helicopters. (planned capability to embark MV-22 Osprey VTOL tilt-rotors) and F-35B Joint Strike Fighters (JSF) STOVL aircraft)

Landing/Attack Craft: 3 LCACs or 2 LCUs

Ships:

USS Wasp (LH-D1), Norfolk, VA

USS Essex (LHD-2), San Diego, CA.

USS Kearsarge (LHD-3), Norfolk, VA

USS Boxer (LHD-4), San Diego, CA

USS Bataan (LHD-5), Norfolk, VA

USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD-6), Sasebo, Japan

USS Iwo Jima (LHD-7), Norfolk, VA

USS Makin Island (LHD-8), San Diego, CA

http://www.navy.mil/navydata/fact_display.asp?cid=4200&tid=400&ct=4

Last Update: 13 April 2016

 

Wasp class Multiple Purpose Amphibious Assault Ship (LHD)

 

LHD

General Purpose Amphibious Assault Ship (LHA)


LHA 

http://www.public.navy.mil/surfor/Pages/AmphibiousAssualtShip.aspx#.V4WUkq3n_3g

 

LHA-1 Tarawa class

 

Once our Marines come home from Afghanistan they can join the ranks of MEA/MAG’S operating off ships and providing security for forward deployed air fields working in conjunction with Rangers securing the air field any where in the world.

 

America Class Amphibious Assault Ship, United States of America

 

“The America Class amphibious assault ships are being built by Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding for the US Navy. These ships are intended to replace the Tarawa Class amphibious assault ships. Previously known as LHA (R), the first ship, USS America (LHA-6), is expected to be delivered by 2013. USS America is the fourth ship in the US Navy to bear the name.

 

In June 2007, the US Navy signed a $2.4bn fixed-price incentive contract with Northrop Grumman for the detail design and construction of the amphibious assault ship, LHA 6. The keel was laid down at Northrop Grumman's Ingalls shipyard in July 2009.

 

In June 2010, Northrop Grumman was awarded a $175m advance procurement contract for LHA 7 by the US Navy. These funds will be used for the procurement of long-lead time materials and major equipment for the new vessel and to execute initial design and planning. The work will be carried out at the Gulf Coast facilities of the company. LHA-7, named USS Tripoli, will be laid down in April 2013 and her commission is planned in 2018.

 

USS America (LHA-6) amphibious assault ship design

 

Based on the hull design of USS Makin Island (LHD-8), USS America (LHA-6) will be equipped with a gas turbine propulsion system. The design incorporates several modifications to complement aviation operations and support activities. The well deck has been converted into an extended hangar deck and includes two wide and high bay areas. An overhead crane will be installed in each bay area for aircraft maintenance.

 

"The America Class ships are being built by Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding."

 

The design also includes a reconfigurable command and control centre, a hospital, additional aviation fuel storage facilities and aviation support areas. These changes will enable the ship to serve joint, inter-agency and transnational maritime forces.

 

The ship will have an overall length of 257.2m and a beam of 32.3m. The displacement of the vessel will be 44,854t. The hybrid propulsion system provides a maximum speed of over 22kt. The ship can accommodate 1,204 crew and 1,871 troops.

 

America Class aircraft capabilities

 

The vessel will have hangar large enough to accommodate aircraft movement. The ship will also have increased aviation fuel capacity, and storage for aviation parts and support equipment. With its 45,000t displacement and complement of strike fighters, it can serve in the small carrier role.

 

The America Class can accommodate 12 MV-22B Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft, six STOVL F-35B Lightning II joint strike fighters, four AH-1Z attack helicopters, four CH-53Ks and three UH-1Y utility helicopters. The ship can also support cargo operations, attack helicopters and the AV-8B Harriers. The exact configuration of the ship's aircraft complement will vary based on its mission.

 

America Class missiles

 

The America Class amphibious assault ships will be armed with two rolling airframe missile launchers and two evolved Sea Sparrow missile (ESSM) launchers. ESSM launchers are used against incoming missiles, aircraft and other surface threats.

 

Naval guns

 

The ship will be fitted with seven twin .50-calibre Browning machine guns. Two 20mm Phalanx close-in weapon systems (CIWS) will also be mounted on the vessel. The phalanx CIWS provides self-defence against anti-ship missiles and close-in air and surface threats.

 

Countermeasures

 

"The America Class ships be fitted with the ship self-defence system developed by Raytheon."

 

The America Class ships will be fitted with the ship self-defence system (SSDS) developed by Raytheon. SSDS comprises software and commercial off-the-shelf hardware. It integrates radars with anti-air weapons including hardkill (missiles and rapid fire gun systems) and soft-kill (decoys).

 

The SSDS receives data from individual radars, the electronic support measures system (radar warning receiver) and the identification-friend or foe system. It forms a composite track from this data which is used to identify, prioritise and track threats.

The system provides final layer of self protection against anti-ship cruise missiles, including subsonic (Mach 0.9) and supersonic (Mach 2+) low-altitude variants.

 

Propulsion

 

The ship will be powered with hybrid mechanical-electric propulsion system. The system consists of two LM2500+ gas turbines and two 5,000hp auxiliary propulsion motors. Each gas turbine is rated at 35,290shp and provides speeds in excess of 22kt.

The propellers will be driven either by the gas turbines or by the electric motors. The onboard service electrical system powers the electric motors. The system allows the ship to run in a more fuel efficient mode across its speed range” (Ref. Naval Technology). http://www.naval-technology.com/projects/americaclassamphibio

 

New Amphibious Ship Ordered for Navy, Destroyer To Come

 

WASHINGTON — “Gulf shipbuilders gained a new amphibious ship late Friday, and the US Navy has agreed to add a destroyer at a key Maine shipyard. The moves reflect the resolution of a long-standing “hull swap agreement” involving the ships and the Navy’s two biggest shipbuilders.

 

Huntington Ingalls Industries received a $200 million not-to-exceed undefinitized contract action (or UCA) to order long-lead time material and perform design work on LPD-28, a yet-to-be-named 12th ship in the LPD-17 San Antonio class of amphibious transport dock ships. The ship, which the Navy did not request, was added by Congress to increase the fleet’s amphibious fleet and better meet US Marine Corps requirements.

 

The total cost of a “fully-scoped” LPD-28 is expected to be around $2.023 billion, the Navy said last year.

 

As a result of the award, General Dynamics will receive another DDG-51 Arleigh Burke-class destroyer beyond the batch already on order.

 

By creating a 12th LPD-17, the government invoked a hull swap agreement dating back to 2002, when a memorandum of understanding (MOU) between the Navy and its shipbuilders transferred the contracts of three LPDs that would have been built at the General Dynamics Bath Iron Works (BIW) yard in Bath, Maine, to what was then Northrop Grumman’s Ingalls and Avondale yards in Louisiana and Mississippi. Bath, in exchange, received three DDG-51s originally assigned to the Ingalls shipyard in Pascagoula, Mississippi.

 

Since then, the LPD program was cut from 12 to 10, then back up to 11 ships, ending with LPD-27. Northrop got out of the shipbuilding business and a new entity — HII — was formed, including Ingalls and the now-closed Avondale shipyards. The DDG 51 program was also scheduled to end at DDG 112, but was subsequently restarted by the Navy, awarding contracts to both Ingalls and BIW. As of now, all destroyer contracts through DDG-126 in fiscal 2017 have been awarded, split between Ingalls and Bath.

The MOU was reaffirmed by the Navy in 2009, when another swap agreement was signed between the Navy, BIW and Ingalls over work on DDG-1000 Zumwalt-class destroyers.

 

But the original MOU included a phrase that would come into effect should a twelfth LPD materialize: “A fourth DDG 51-class ship or equivalent workload would be awarded to [BIW] preceding, or concurrent with the award of LPD-28.”

 

With Congress’ action to add long-lead funding for LPD-28, the Navy and the shipbuilders worked to resolve the issue.

 

“Consistent with the ‘swap agreement,’ the Navy will award BIW a corresponding DDG-51 ship,” said Capt. Thurraya Kent, spokesperson for the Navy’s acquisition directorate. “This ship would be in addition to the currently contracted multiyear ships, subject to congressional authorization and appropriation.”

 

Based on the current 10-ship multiyear buy, which runs through DDG-126, the next ship could wear hull number DDG-127, although that determination is not yet official. Since LPD-28 was not requested by the Navy and added by Congress, the extra destroyer for Bath might also be outside the Navy’s existing multiyear destroyer buy.

 

Congress, however, still needs to authorize and approve funding for the destroyer, Kent cautioned.

 

Complicating the assignment of a specific hull number for the destroyer is the situation at Bath, where all destroyer building schedules — including DDG-51s and three DDG-1000 Zumwalt-class ships — are under review. It is not clear where the extra ship could fit into the yard’s production schedule.

 

General Dynamics declined to comment on the award, but Steve Sloan, Ingalls’ LPD-28 program manager, was enthusiastic about keeping the LPD-17 production line going and filling a gap until the new LX(R) amphibious ship program comes online in a few years.

 

“LPD-28 is a transition ship from LPD to LXR,” Sloan said. “We’ll have those shipbuilders rolling off LPD-26 and 27 and into 28 on a hot production line.”

 

LPD-26, the John P. Murtha, is 95 percent complete and scheduled to begin sea trials in early 2016. LPD-27, the Portland, is 70 percent complete and will launch in January.

 

About 2,000 employees typically work on an LPD, Sloan said.

 

Compared with previous ships, LPD-28 will have several modifications, Sloan said — most coming from Ingalls’ proposed LX(R) design. The most visible changes will be elimination of the towering enclosed masts, which had been built of composite material at HII’s now-closed Gulfport, Mississippi, facility.

 

“LPD will have an open mast, similar to DDG-51,” Sloan said. “No more composite enclosures. And we borrowed the platform mast from [the assault ship America design] for the air search radar on the aft mast.”

 

The schedule for the ship’s construction is still being finalized, but Sloan expects the Navy to issue a request for proposal in early 2016.

 

“Our intent is to turn that proposal around pretty quickly,” he said. “We expect a contract award late in 2016, and start-of-fabrication in December 2016.”

 

Delivery, he added, would likely come in the second half of 2021.

 

The Ingalls shipyard builds more kinds of ships than any other yard doing major government work. Under construction now are the large amphibious assault ship Tripoli, four DDG-51-class destroyers and three National Security Cutters for the US Coast Guard” (Ref. Defense News, By Christopher P. Cavas - Email ccavas@defensenews.com - 7:20 p.m. EST December 4, 2015).

http://www.defensenews.com/story/defense/naval/ships/2015/12/04/amphibious-ship-destroyer-huntington-ingalls-general-dynamics-bath-iron-works-shipbuilding/76806676