USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Final Foreign Water Fleet Deployment

 

Part I of VI (10 February to 26 March 2012)

Part II of VI (27 March to 12 May 2012)

Part III of VI (12 May to 18 July 2012)

Part IV of VI (19 July to 21 September 2012)

Part V of VI (22 September to 3 November 2012)

Part VI of VI (4 November 2012)

 

 

The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) is underway on her 25th and final deployment.

 

120927-N-FI736-128 - U.S. 5th FLEET AREA OF RESPONSIBILITY (Sept. 27, 2012) - The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65) is underway on her 25th and final deployment. Enterprise is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Scott Pittman/Released)

http://www.navy.mil/view_image.asp?id=134826

 

The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise, right, the guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG 78) and the guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) transit back to their homeport of Norfolk, Va.

 

121002-N-AP176-195 - U.S. 5TH FLEET AREA OF RESPONSIBILITY (Oct. 2, 2012) - The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise, right, the guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG-78) and the guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG-69) transit back to their homeport of Norfolk, Va. Enterprise, Porter and Vicksburg are returning from a deployment to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility, where the ship conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeff Atherton/Released)

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=70138

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was underway in the North Arabian Sea from 27 August to 7 October 2012, entering the Gulf of Aden and transited the Bab al Mandeb strait, a strategically important strait, 27 km (17 mi) wide on the 8th en route to the Red Sea” (Ref. 76).

 

The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) moves through the Suez Canal for the last time.

 

121012-N-ZZ999-034 - SUEZ CANAL (Oct. 12, 2012) - The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65) moves through the Suez Canal for the last time. Enterprise was deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. The U.S. Navy is reliable, flexible, and ready to respond worldwide on, above, and below the sea. Join the conversation on social media using #warfighting. (U.S. Navy photo by Information Systems Technician 1st Class Stephen Wolff/Released)

http://www.navy.mil/view_image.asp?id=135769

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was underway in the Red Sea from 9 to 11 October 2012, completed operations in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations on 1 November 2006, making her 19th Suez Canal transit since her commission on the 12th” (Ref. 76).

 

Enterprise Transits the Suez Canal for the Final Time

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) has been the first to do a lot of things. The "Big E" was the world's first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier and the first carrier to respond to the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. On April 29, 1986, Enterprise did something that no other nuclear-powered carrier had ever done - she transited the Suez Canal, the world's largest man-made canal, adding another first to an already long list of accomplishments.

The 1986 transit brought
Enterprise back into the Mediterranean Sea for the first time in 22 years, as she shifted homeports from Alameda, Calif., back to Norfolk, Va., where she was originally commissioned in 1961. Twenty-six years later, on 12  October 2012, the "Big E" passed through the Suez Canal for the final time as she transitioned from the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility (AOR) to U.S. 6th Fleet AOR, entering the Mediterranean Sea for the last time.

The transit marks the beginning of the last leg of the carrier's historic and final deployment, after seven months of operations at sea. The
Suez Canal is a 120-mile long, 79-foot-deep canal that runs through Egypt's Sinai Peninsula, allowing mariners to transit from the Red Sea to the Mediterranean Sea, and vice versa. Because the canal is so shallow and narrow, the transit puts the skills of even the most seasoned helmsman to the test, as the canal was not originally designed to accommodate ships the size of an aircraft carrier. In fact, the evolution usually takes anywhere from 14-20 hours to complete.

"Planning for this type of evolution starts months out to try to minimize any hiccups," said Chief Quartermaster Craig J. Bowman. "We (
Navigation Department) lay out the ship's planned track with proposed or planned times to be at certain places. Other departments on the ship take the information we provide and plan when and where they can or can't do evolutions - or when they need to shut off or stop certain services." Because Enterprise was the first to make the historic journey through the Suez Canal, those involved in its current transit believe that there is a bit of reverence in having the honor to take the "Big E" through "the Ditch" for the final time.

"To bring
Enterprise through the Suez Canal for the last time is certainly an honor," said Cmdr. Donald Kennedy, Enterprise's Navigator. "For more than 50 years, "Big E" Sailors have expertly stood the long watches required to navigate Enterprise safely. To be among the last to see her through the Suez Canal will no doubt be one of the most memorable experiences of my career." Many "Big E" crewmembers agree that it is an honor to be involved with the final cruise and Suez Canal transit of the world's first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. The cruise marks a milestone in not only their careers, but their lives as well.

"Being involved in the planning of the transit is something that no one can take away from me or anyone else on the Navigation team," said Bowman. "I went through as a QM1 (quartermaster first class) and I am coming out as a QMC (chief quartermaster). Just adding that to the transit makes this that much more memorable for me."

 

Enterprise is scheduled to return to its homeport of Norfolk at the end of its current deployment to begin its inactivation process after 51 years of service” (Ref. Story Number: NNS121015-04 - Release Date: 10/15/2012 8:04:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class (SW) Brian G. Reynolds, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).
http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=70146

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was underway in the Red Sea from 9 to 11 October 2012, completed operations in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations on 1 November 2006, making her 19th Suez Canal transit since her commission on the 12th, standing into the Mediterranean Sea and entered the 6th Fleet AOR on the 13th” (Ref. 76).

 

"Big E" Celebrates Navy Birthday Underway for the Last TimeWatch Video

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) did its part in celebrating the Navy's 237th birthday with its own unique flare on 13 October 2012.

For over 200 years, the United States Navy has stood the watch as the shield of the republic. It has protected the country and its interests around the world.

Enterprise Sailors celebrated the Navy's 237th birthday the "Big E" way. Amelia Chappell, the fitness boss aboard "Big E," coordinated with Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) to put together a fun exercise event for the crew. The event took place in the hangar bay both in the morning and at night to give everyone a chance to participate. Each Sailor taking part in the event was asked to do 237 push ups and 237 curl-ups to honor the Navy's birthday.

The Enlisted Junior Sailor Organization (EJSO) hosted the traditional cutting of the Navy's birthday cake. The Chief's Mess also participated by helping serve the cake.

"On the 237
th birthday of our Navy, we have the honor to serve in the greatest maritime force ever seen," said Operations Specialist 2nd Class Leteaisha A. Carter, EJSO president. "So with humility, we continue trying to live up to the example of those who have come before us."

The cake-cutting ceremony began with opening remarks delivered by Carter and Capt. William C. Hamilton, Jr., commanding officer of
Enterprise.

The cutting of the cake has been a long standing tradition in which the oldest and the youngest Sailor at a command cut the first piece.
Enterprise took part in this tradition for the last time as the legendary carrier begins to wrap up its final deployment.

Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) Airman Joseph R. Burris, of
Air Department's V-3 Division, and Capt. Stephen Paulette, the oral-maxillofacial surgeon aboard Enterprise, were selected to cut the cake. Boatswain's Mate 1st Class Timothy Lumpkin, leading petty officer of Deck Department's 2nd Division, rang the eight bells signaling the beginning of the next year for the Navy.

Enterprise celebrated its last Navy birthday with pride. Sailors from every corner of the ship turned out for the evening celebration. Without a shadow of a doubt, this birthday celebration was truly one to remember” (Ref. Story Number: NNS121014-05 - Release Date: 10/14/2012 11:34:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Heath Zeigler, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=70137

 

The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) transits the Strait of Messina.

 

121015-N-AP176-041 - STRAIT OF MESSINA (Oct. 15, 2012) - The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65) transits the Strait of Messina. Enterprise is deployed to the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeff Atherton/Released)

http://www.navy.mil/view_image.asp?id=136071

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was underway in the Mediterranean Sea from 13 to 15 October 2012, entering the Strait of Messina on the 15th” (Ref. 76).

 

Enterprise Arrives in Naples, Italy for Final Foreign Port Visit

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) anchored off the coast of Naples, Italy, for its final port visit following seven months at sea on 16 October 2012 and by the 17th headed back to the Mediterranean Sea via the Strait of Messina.

The visit serves to demonstrate the Navy's commitment to regional stability and maritime security in the U.S. 6
th Fleet Area of Responsibility and to help strengthen the already positive relationship between the U.S. and Italy.

While in Italy, the Sailors and Marines of
Enterprise and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1, the "Big E's" embarked air wing, will experience the rich history and culture of the historic city of Naples and take advantage of Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR)-sponsored tours to Rome, Pisa and Florence.

Crew members are also scheduled to participate in community outreach programs with a local church and orphanage.

Enterprise departed her homeport of Norfolk, Va., on 11 March 2012 for a regular deployment to the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility to conduct Maritime Security Operations, theater security cooperation efforts and missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.

Enterprise is scheduled to inactivate in a ceremony on Dec. 1, 2012, following the completion of the ship's current deployment, bringing to an end 51 years of distinguished service” (Ref. Story Number: NNS121019-01 - Release Date: 10/19/2012 7:12:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class (SW) Steve Smith, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=70234

 

Vicksburg Arrives in Lisbon, Portugal

 

“Guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG-69) and guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG-78) arrived in Lisbon, Portugal, for a regularly-scheduled port visit on 17 October 2012. The visit serves to continue U.S. 6th Fleet efforts to build global maritime partnerships with European nations and improve maritime safety and security in the region.

"[U.S. Navy] ships go into Lisbon because of [Portugal's] longstanding friendship with the U.S.," said Capt. Logan Jones, commanding officer of
Vicksburg. "[Vicksburg and Porter] Sailors gain an opportunity to learn about, and see, someone else's homeland. [We also] have an opportunity to show the quality of our ships and our Sailors."

While sightseeing will likely play a big role in Lisbon, it is not the sole purpose of the visit. "While here, we want to make friends and strengthen the bonds between our two great nations and show our commitment to maritime security," said Cmdr. Carl Brobst, executive officer of
Vicksburg.

 

"I want our Sailors out there building relationships through community relations projects. We're here to absorb the culture, build community relations and contribute to the economy." Though U.S. Navy ships visit Lisbon, it is far from the most common European port.

"This will be my first time in Lisbon," said Command Master Chief Robert W. Bostic, command master chief of
Vicksburg. "It is a very unique port in that a lot of Sailors don't get a chance to come here. There will be an opportunity for [Vicksburg and Porter Sailors] to see a lot with minimum travel." Vicksburg and Porter are conducting this port visit as part of a scheduled deployment to the U.S. 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility.

Vicksburg and Porter are deployed as part of the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group to support Maritime Security Operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility” (Ref. Story Number: NNS121019-02 - Release Date: 10/19/2012 7:13:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Nick Scott, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS VICKSBURG, At Sea (NNS)).http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=70235

 

Enterprise Gives Back to Italy During Community Outreach

 

“Sailors and Marines from USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG-94) volunteered at Centro Laila during a scheduled port visit to Naples, Italy on 17 October 2012. Centro Laila was started 28 years ago by the parents of Gisele Luciano, the center's current director.

It began when the Lucianos provided a single child with food and shelter because they wanted to help do something positive for the community. The organization grew to 43 children who they now provide with food, shelter, schooling and medical care.

Sailors and Marines helped by clearing brush, sweeping the grounds and painting fences. They also spent time with the children playing games and helping to serve food during lunch. As a family-run organization, the operators of Centro Laila said they feel fortunate they have been able to accomplish so much on their own, but insist that without the help of volunteers, it would be a daunting, almost impossible, task.

"We need volunteers," said Luciano. "Luckily we are a family, so we all help each other out, but we still need help from outside people. We are very happy to have Sailors and Marines to come and do the hard work for us." The spirit of the community outreach was evidenced by the hard work of the people who volunteered their time to help those they didn't know.

"We always say we are the ambassadors for the United States," said Chief Religious Programs Specialist Redor Rufo, U.S. 6
th Fleet community relations coordinator, "so whatever we do for the country that hosts us makes a big impact. This is a prime example of the positive relationship between the United States and the Italian government."

It's more than just representing a nation. Beneath the surface, at the heart of the project, are people like Lt. Cmdr. Claude Taylor,
Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department assistant maintenance officer, who do this out of a sense of pride and personal fulfillment.

"This gives us an opportunity to give back to the community, whether it is our community or another country's. I just enjoy doing the work and spending time with the Sailors," said Taylor. "Every time I come out to one of these projects and see the amount of work they put in, it makes me feel good about how our Sailors and Marines are doing and the work that we do for everyone worldwide." Giving back to any community certainly involves, work but the rewards are priceless

"Thank you, thank you, thank you to everybody because it's important for us," said Luciano. "Maybe you think it's a little thing to be here and help clean up or paint, but for us it's the little things all together that make all the difference to us and these children"” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS121022-03 - Release Date: 10/22/2012 9:18:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Randy J. Savarese, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, NAPLES, Italy (NNS)).
http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=70274

 

'Big E' Sailors Lend a Hand at the Abbey of San Vincenzo

 

“Sailors and Marines from USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG-94) volunteered at a monastery while in port in Naples, Ital y on 18 October 2012. Eleven Sailors from various departments aboard the "Big E" and Nitze aided in light gardening and the pruning of olive trees in preparation for the upcoming harvest at the Abbey of San Vincenzo.

The Abbey of San Vincenzo is a monastery of Benedictine nuns dedicated to contemplative life in the 1,500 year old tradition of St. Benedict. St. Benedict, the father of modern monasticism, believed a key component to forming a community was the balance between prayer and work; known as "ora et labora."

The grounds of the Central Italian monastery, nestled near the source of the Volturno River, at the foot of the Mainarde mountains, served as the backdrop for the five-hour project.

"It was beautiful," said Cryptologic Technician 1st Class Shanika L. King. "It was basically just going out to the monastery and helping them. It was an experience I will treasure for the rest of my life."

The nuns of San Vincenzo cultivate a special appreciation for the land which provides the stable base of the monastery. They believe it is through the land and the animals that the community experiences the seasonal cycles of nature in complement of the seasonal cycle of the liturgy of the church.

"They [the nuns of San Vincenzo] took the grounds literally from nothing to something to be very proud of," said Lt. Cmdr. Claude E. Taylor,
Enterprise's Aviation Intermediate Maintenance Department assistance maintenance officer and and one of the volunteers. "It is nice to see we have our own countrymen working in this country and they are doing good work."

"It makes me feel very special," said King. "It really made me thankful that I was able to do this. I enjoyed listening to the history the nuns spoke of and the things they did to get to this point. Just the outcome of all the handiwork and the different people they helped over the years...it was amazing."

According to the nuns of San Vincenzo, working the land "takes a special kind of teamwork and brings a shared joy in the fruits of labor," a sentiment Enterprise Sailors learned firsthand.

"They [
Enterprise Sailors] got to see a part of Italy they have never seen before and an area that has such historical significance both in Italian culture and in world culture," said Taylor. "This visit reaffirmed the fact that we do need to take time out and give of ourselves, and that is what these ladies at the monastery have been doing. It is good to give other people a minute of your service"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS121022-10 - Release Date: 10/22/2012 1:20:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jared King, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, NAPLES, Italy (NNS)).
http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=70272

 

Sailors and Marines assigned to the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1 depart the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) for liberty during the ships final scheduled port visit.

 

121019-N-FI736-007 - NAPLES, Italy (Oct. 19, 2012) - Sailors and Marines assigned to the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1 depart the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65) for liberty during the ships final scheduled port visit before its upcoming decommissioning. Enterprise is deployed to the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. The U.S. Navy is constantly deployed to preserve peace, protect commerce, and deter aggression through forward presence. Join the conversation on social media using #warfighting. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Scott Pittman/Released)

 

Enterprise Sailors Assist the Sisters of the Mission of Charity

 

“Sailors and Marines from USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG-94) volunterered at the Mission of Charity Men's Shelter and the Mission of Charity Women's Shelter in Naples, Italy on 19 Octobe 2012. The Mission of Charity visit marked the final scheduled community outreach event in a foreign port for the "Big E," as Enterprise is scheduled to be inactivated later this year.

Crew members seized this opportunity to give back to the Italian community and to give a helping hand to those less fortunate. "This gives us an opportunity to give back and let the community know that we are more than just Sailors," said Lt. Cmdr. Claude E. Taylor,
Enterprise's Aviation Intermediate Maintenance Department assistant maintenance officer.

 

"Things like this show a different side of us. We are human beings and care about our fellow man." During the event, crew members from the "Big E" helped clean the two monasteries and did minor yard work. The two Catholic monasteries offer basic assistance to displaced men, women and children in the Naples area, offering food, shelter, education and religious needs to those less fortunate.

The participants were split up into two groups. One group assisted with cleaning the men's shelter, while the other group traveled to the women's shelter to assist with trimming branches and doing minor landscaping work in the courtyard behind the shelter.

When the
Enterprise Sailors and Marines visited the sites, they were greeted by the Sisters of the Mission of Charity. The nuns showed a great amount of appreciation for the hard work the Sailors had accomplished.

When the work was completed, crew members presented the Sisters with a book of photos of the ship on behalf of the commanding officer of
Enterprise, expressing their appreciation for their cause and the opportunity to help. "It makes me feel good to be a part of this great team we have and to be able to help those who are in need of assistance," said Enterprise's Aviation Machinist's Mate 1st Class, Jose Herring.

Throughout the current deployment, the crew of
Enterprise has participated in numerous community relations projects in Greece, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain, demonstrating that "Big E" Sailors are more than merely members of the military and they care about making a difference in people's lives.

"It shows people there are those who are willing to lend a helping hand for any assistance that may be needed at the time," said Herring” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS121022-01 - Release Date: 10/22/2012 9:06:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class (SW) Brian G. Reynolds, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, NAPLES, Italy (NNS)).

Grandmasters Set to Complete Deployment

 

As reported on 21 October 2012, “the Grandmasters of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 46, Detachment Six, also known as the "Big Irons", are nearing the end of their recent deployment aboard guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG-69) with record numbers.

The "Big Irons" of Det. 6 have been on station with the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group (ENTCSG) throughout the strike group's deployment. The detachment's primary role has been to provide nighttime surface surveillance and control as well as anti-terrorism force protection and logistics support to the strike group.

"I've been with {the Big Irons} for one year, and I have never seen a harder working detachment," said Aviation Ordnanceman Airman (AW) Lionel Harris. "I see a lot of hard work and a lot of team players even though we all come from different rates. I am the only {aviation ordnanceman}, but I feel like part of the team and right at home."

During the deployment and workup cycle, Det. 6 flew more than 1,500 hours during the course of 305 days, used more than 203,602 gallons of fuel, transported more than 15 tons of cargo, carried more than 80 passengers and flew 62 missions, making them one of the most efficient air detachments in the Navy.

"We have flown more hours than any other detachment I know of," said Lt. Hunter Marner, a pilot with Det. 6. "With seven pilots and three air crewman, we logged a lot of hours, but we were up to the challenge." With the large number of missions flown by the Big Irons, detachment Sailors were expected to be on top of their game.

"We always had to be flexible," said Naval Aircrewman (Tactical Helicopter) 2nd Class (NAC/AW/SW) Phillip M. Gullo. "It was a constant challenge, but when you love your job, it makes it worth doing." Big Irons leadership also noticed the hard work of their crew.

"Our guys stepped up to the plate and they crushed it," said Lt. Benjamin Ross, the detachment maintenance officer. "Everyone from the {mechanics} turning wrenches to the electricians chasing wires and the aircrews managing the operations side of it all...they made it happen."

"I was very proud of all efforts that were put into making us one of the hardest working detachments in the Navy," said Marner. "It was a huge group effort; we couldn't have done it if we had been missing even one of our Sailors."

Vicksburg is deployed as part of the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group to support Maritime Security Operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th nd 6th Fleet areas of responsibility” (Ref. Story Number: NNS121021-02 - Release Date: 10/21/2012 10:36:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Nick Scott, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS VICKSBURG, At Sea (NNS)).

 

Enterprise Visits Naples for the Last Time

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) anchored off the coast of Naples, Italy from 17 to 22 October 2012 underway in the Mediterranean Sea from 20 to 22 October 2012” (Ref. 76).

As reported on 22 October 2012, “in 1962, a brand-new aircraft carrier, USS Enterprise (CVN-65), visited Naples, Italy, for the first time. Times were different then. The United States was in the midst of a massive arms build-up with the Soviet Union, while involvement in Vietnam was beginning to escalate.

 

A band from Liverpool, England, called The Beatles, began blowing up airwaves across the U.S. and the entire world. It was Enterprise's first deployment. The newly-christened carrier was deployed to the U.S. 6th Fleet area of operations to take part in several NATO exercises with partner nations.

 

The "Big E" visited Naples, Italy for one week in September before being deployed to Cuba for the October Cuban Missile Crisis. Fifty years later, Enterprise returned to Naples, Italy from 16 to 21 October 2012. Only this time, she's been around. Her decks are seasoned with the sweat of the over 100,000 Sailors and Marines that have formed her ranks through her 51 years of service.

"
Enterprise made a port call in Naples on its first deployment in 1962," said William C Hamilton, the commanding officer of Enterprise. "Since that time, Enterprise has visited Naples six more times during its 50-plus years of service."

During the port of call, Sailors and Marines had the chance to unwind and soak up the rich Italian culture. The ship's
Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department offered several discounted tours and overnight activities that highlighted some of the must-see areas of mainland Italy.

"Besides shopping and eating the delicious food, nearly 5,000 Sailors and Marines have the chance to experience Italian culture and history during the many tours that have been arranged for us," said Hamilton. "This is an experience of a lifetime."

The tours gave
"Big E" Sailors the opportunity to experience locations spanning the Iberian Peninsula. The tours included trips to Rome, Florence, Pompeii and Pisa - to name a few. "Rome was absolutely beautiful," said Information Specialist 3rd Class Andrea Tourville. "Italy is an absolutely moving place. There is so much history there."

"The tours that I took to Florence and Pisa were something that I will always remember," said Information Systems Technician 1st Class Stephen Wolff. "The smell of espresso and fresh basil in the air was amazing. It is truly a place immersed in history and culture."
Enterprise also took the time to welcome their Italian hosts aboard for an evening. On 19 October 2012 a reception was held in the ship's hangar bay to express appreciation for the long-lasting relationship that the legendary carrier has had with the people of Italy.

The reception was attended by several Italian and U.S. dignitaries, including Prince Carlo Di Borbone, David Thorne, U.S. ambassador to the Italian Republic and the Republic of San Marino and Adm. Bruce Clingan, commander, Allied Joint Forces Command, commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe and commander, U.S. Naval Forces Africa.

"This is a wonderful opportunity for us as the U.S. Navy to express our appreciation to Italy; to thank you for being a wonderful host nation and a steadfast and capable ally," said Clingan, as he addressed those in attendance at the reception.

Naples is the second-largest city in Italy, steaming with cultural fragrance. The metropolitan city is located with convenient access to historical Rome, Herculaneum, Pompeii and Mount Vesuvius. Prior to leaving Italy, Sailors and Marines from the "Big E" also spent their time in Naples reaching out to the Italian people through several community relations activities that took place in various churches and monasteries in the Neapolitan region.

As the anchor was weighed,
Enterprise departed the city of Naples for the final time, symbolically closing the circle on nearly half a century of service across the globe. Just as Naples was the ship's first foreign port of call, it was also her last” (Ref. Story Number: NNS121022-05 - Release Date: 10/22/2012 10:40:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Brian G. Reynolds, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).
http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=70273

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was underway in the Strait of Gibraltar on 23 October 2012, entering the Atlantic on the 24th” (Ref. 76).

 

An MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Dragon Whales of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 28 picks up ammunition from the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) during the carrier's last ammunition offload.

 

121025-N-ZZ999-131 - ATLANTIC OCEAN (Oct. 25, 2012) - An MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Dragon Whales of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 28 picks up ammunition from the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65) during the carrier's last ammunition offload. Enterprise is completing its final deployment to the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. The U.S. Navy is reliable, flexible, and ready to respond worldwide on, above, and below the sea. Join the conversation on social media using #warfighting. (U.S. Navy photo by Information Systems Technician 1st Class Stephen Wolff/Released)

 

Enterprise Completes Final Ammunition Offload Before Inactivation

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Weapons Department completed the historic carrier's final ammunition offload in the Eastern Atlantic from 24 to 26 October 2012. During the offload, 3,348,000 pounds of ordnance and ammunition were transferred from Enterprise to Military Sealift Command dry cargo and ammunition ships USNS Matthew Perry (T-AKE-9) and USNS Sacagawea (T-AKE-2).

Because
Enterprise is scheduled to be inactivated later this year, all ammunition and ordnance - other than small arms used for security purposes - had to be transferred off of the ship. "The planning was a major challenge," said Lt. Cmdr. Thomas L. Hinnant, the ordnance handling officer aboard Enterprise. "We have been talking to the Sacagawea for about a year. There are so many entities involved in an evolution of this size that it takes a lot of coordination."

"The evolution was extremely difficult because we faced so many challenges planning for such an event," said Senior Chief Aviation Ordnanceman Steven J. Black, the leading chief petty officer of
Enterprise's Aviation Ordnance Control Center. "As in any situation, plans change and the Weapons department had to be flexible and adapt to whatever changes were thrown at us. Once we finally got the go ahead, we were ready and our people pulled it off flawlessly."

The process of dismantling over 1,600 tons of ordnance was undoubtedly a daunting one. The process began one month ago, shortly after
Enterprise flew its final sortie in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Soon thereafter, the ship's Weapons Department began dismantling and repacking all of the ship's ordnance. Once the ammunition was dismantled and repacked, Sailors in the Weapons Department began staging the ordnance so that it would be ready to be removed from the ship.

"This was a big undertaking," said Hinnant. "The staging process on this ship is more challenging than any other ship in the Navy." After the ordnance was staged in
Enterprise's hangar bay and on the flight deck, a task accomplished with the help of the "Big E's" Air department, the Weapons Department relied on the Dragonslayers of Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron (HS) 11 to transport much of the ordnance from Enterprise to Sacagawea via vertical replenishment.

"Our job was to assist
Enterprise and Sacagawea with the vertical replenishment," said Lt. Marcus A. Torres, a pilot with HS-11 who assisted with the vertical replenishment. "Our main focus was to effectively [and safely] assist both ships with the ammo offload to help facilitate an expeditious return home."

However, what may sound like a routine vertical replenishment was no easy task.
Enterprise, Sacagawea and HS-11 faced rough seas and inauspicious weather conditions, which played a major role in making this vertical replenishment more difficult than it may have been under normal conditions.

"This was definitely one of the more challenging
vertical replenishments," said Torres, "especially when you take into account the sea state and the wind conditions, but we pulled it off without any major issues."

 

During the offload, the Weapons Department also worked closely with Enterprise's Deck department to successfully transport the ammunition that was staged in the hangar bay. "The main priority of the Deck Department was to move the barrels of ammunition from the hangar bay to the Sacagawea using the sliding pad-eye from stations 5 and 13," said Boatswain's Mate 1st Class Timothy W. Lumpkin, the leading petty officer of Deck Department's 2nd Division.

Much like HS-11, the Sailors of the Deck department faced the challenges of the elements. "The heavy seas and high winds were definitely a challenge for us," said Lumpkin. "The heavy seas caused the ships to surge - causing the ships to come closer together, rather than further apart - while we were moving ammo. After doing this for three days, fatigue was also an issue. But we weathered the storm and completed the job as we always do."

After nearly three days of intense coordination and hard work of Enterprise's entire crew, all of
"Big E's" ammunition and ordnance was successfully removed from the ship without any major issues. During the evolution, the crew conducted 314 connected replenishment lifts and 946 vertical replenishment lifts, for a total of 1,260 lifts.

While the
"Big E's" may have offloaded the last piece of ordnance it will ever hold in its weapons magazines, the ammunition will be used elsewhere. "All of the ordnance had to be offloaded as part of our [inactivation] process," said Black. "But, the assets will be distributed as needed throughout the Fleet to support the Navy's mission."

As the ship finishes the last leg of its final deployment, the
Weapons Department aboard Enterprise can breathe a brief sigh of relief knowing that such a massive undertaking is behind them. "I could not have asked for a better group of people to have the privilege of being their ordnance handling officer," said Hinnant. "They have done an amazing job the last three years of keeping us above board on all ordnance matters."

Many of the Sailors who make up the ranks of the ship's
Weapons Department used the evolution as an opportunity to show that hard work is what they do best. "It is a great feeling to be a part of such a great team," said Black. "There were many times throughout the offload when I would look around and see junior Sailors pulling double shifts, working the extra hours, doing whatever was necessary to get this job done. These guys knew it was their time to shine; they rose to the occasion and knocked it out of the park."

After completing its final deployment,
Enterprise is scheduled to be inactivated Dec. 1, in a ceremony to be held at Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia, bringing to a close more than 51 years of distinguished service. The inactivation ceremony will be the last official public event for the ship and will serve as a celebration of life for the ship and the more than 100,000 Sailors who have served aboard” (Ref. Story Number: NNS121028-01 - Release Date: 10/28/2012 11:17:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Brian G. Reynolds, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was underway in the Atlantic from 27 to 30 October 2012” (Ref. 76).

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) pulled in for a port of call at Mayport, FL. on 31 October 2012, embarking Friends and Family members for a Tiger Cruise en route Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) made a port of call at Mayport, FL. from 31 October to 1 November 2012, with Friends and Family members embarked for a Tiger Cruise en route to Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted a Friends and Family members Tiger Cruise en route to Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia from 1 to 4 November 2012” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Final Foreign Water Fleet Deployment

 

Part I of VI (10 February to 26 March 2012)

Part II of VI (27 March to 12 May 2012)

Part III of VI (12 May to 18 July 2012)

Part IV of VI (19 July to 21 September 2012)

Part V of VI (22 September to 3 November 2012)

Part VI of VI (4 November 2012)

 

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Final Foreign Water Fleet Deployment

Part V of VI (22 September to 3 November 2012)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIER SHIP

HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619