USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Final Foreign Water Fleet Deployment

 

Part I of VI (10 February to 26 March 2012)

Part II of VI (27 March to 12 May 2012)

Part III of VI (12 May to 18 July 2012)

Part IV of VI (19 July to 21 September 2012)

Part V of VI (22 September to 3 November 2012)

Part VI of VI (4 November 2012)

 

 

Step Vicksburg!

 

Members of the Step Afrika! percussive dance group performed on guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG-69) on 12 May 2012 during their current Navy Entertainment-sponsored tour. Step Afrika!, based in Washington D.C., performed on Vicksburg and aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65) following recent performances in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility.

"{The response} was great and it was moving to see men and women in uniform with the sea in the background," said Jakari Sherman, creative director for Step Afrika!. "It was great to see troops interacting and having fun, being 'on the edge of their seats' so to speak. They didn't know what to expect but, by the end, everyone was participating."

The dance style of stepping creates rhythmic sounds using the human body as an instrument to create a percussive sound. It can trace its roots back to the early twentieth century but didn't become popular until the 1950's, when it was used in African-American fraternity and sorority ceremonies on university campuses.

Stepping uses dance and percussive styles that draw from African-based communities, as well as the U.S. military. "It is very rewarding to be here, and an honor," said Sherman. "It's a once in a lifetime opportunity, but I'd do it twice."

Vicksburg's crew did not know what to expect from the dance group, but were pleasantly surprised. "It's great to be able to step outside yourself and see other cultural things that you may not see very often," said Cryptologic Technician (Collection) Seaman Grant A. Durga. "The Navy is very diverse and the great thing about it is that we get to experience so much from other people. I was moved by the artistry of it and it's always good to see people supporting the troops."

During the show, some
Vicksburg Sailors got to participate with the dance group and were able to show off some moves to their shipmates. "I felt a little goofy at first, but they put me at ease with their sense of humor," said Avionics Electronic Technician 3rd Class Brandon Jordanbrehony, who was one of the Vicksburg Sailors that participated in the show. "I enjoyed participating. They have a sense of community and a sense of tradition that made it well orchestrated."

Vicksburg is on her final deployment and is currently operating in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting Maritime Security Operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as a part of Operation Enduring Freedom” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120513-08 - Release Date: 5/13/2012 9:41:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nick C. Scott, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS VICKSBURG, At Sea (NNS)).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was underway in the North Arabian Sea from 28 April to 12 May 2012. CVW-1 launched first combat sorties in support of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) in Afghanistan” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) entered the Strait of Hormuz on 16 May 2012 and Gulf of Oman, entering the Persian Gulf on the 17th” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was underway in the Persian Gulf from 17 to 19 May 2012” (Ref. 76).

 

Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Seana Carbone examines a patient's heart during a surgical civil action project training exercise.

 

120519-O-ZZ999-005 - PACIFIC OCEAN (May 19, 2012) - Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Seana Carbone examines a patient's heart during a surgical civil action project training exercise aboard the Military Sealift Command hospital ship USNS Mercy (T-AH-19). Mercy is participating in Pacific Partnership 2012, an annual U.S. Pacific Fleet humanitarian and civic assistance mission designed to work by, with and through host partner nations, non-governmental organizations and international agencies to build partnership and a collective ability to respond to natural disasters. (U.S. Navy photo by Kristopher Radder/Released)

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) pulled in for a port of call at Khalifa Bin Salman Port, Bahrain on 20 May 2012

 

Vicksburg Sailors Volunteer at Bahrain School

 

“Sailors assigned to guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG-69) volunteered for a community engagement event during a port visit to the Kingdom of Bahrain on 23 May 2012.

The engagement took place at the Regional Institute for Active Learning (RIA) center, a non-profit school that specializes in teaching children, ages three to 17, who have special needs.

"Our participation in this event has immeasurable benefits," said Lt. Edsil Logan, command chaplain aboard
Vicksburg. "It gives our crew members an opportunity to familiarize themselves with the local community and their culture, while doing something beneficial for others."

As command chaplain, Logan is responsible for coordinating community engagement projects. "Volunteer work not only has the possibility of causing a life-changing impact on the recipients, but creates a sense of personal success and growth within the Sailors who participate," said Logan.

For some Sailors, it was their first time experiencing this type of engagement. "I was really able to connect with the kids and I think they taught me as much as I taught them," said Gas Turbine Systems Technician Specialist (Mechanical) Fireman Charles Holder.

During the event, Sailors tutored students in English and math, and also took part in a 'morning dance.' "The dancing was uplifting and created an atmosphere that made it easy to bond with the kids," said Information Systems Technician 2nd Class Corey Wallace. "It was good to start the morning off participating in something with them."

Wallace was one of many Sailors who expressed an interest in participating in more projects. "If contributing a few hours of my time can change a child's life, then it's worth it," said Wallace. "If given the opportunity to go back, I would be the first to volunteer."

Vicksburg is on its final deployment and is currently operating in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting Maritime Security Operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as a part of Operation Enduring Freedom” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120608-19 - Release Date: 6/8/2012 3:47:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nick C. Scott, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, MANAMA, Bahrain (NNS)).

 

Midshipmen Experience Life at Sea Aboard Enterprise

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) began phase one of its Midshipman Summer Cruise Training Program on 25 May 2012, and will host a total of three phases before the program concludes on 15 August 2012. Nine midshipmen, representing Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps (NROTC) programs from the University of Michigan, North Carolina State University, Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, University of Mississippi and The Citadel, are aboard Enterprise for their summer cruise.

The program is designed to give future naval officers the opportunity to increase their knowledge and operational experiences in the fleet, according to Information Systems Technician 2nd Class Amanda Ward, one of the lead program coordinators. "I hope to just learn the little things that make a good leader," said Midshipman 2nd Class Gabriel Pogliano, from the University of Michigan. "[In NROTC] we get a lot of information about how a junior officer is supposed to lead, but it has been great seeing how the petty officers lead the Sailors under them."

During their stay aboard
Enterprise, midshipmen shadow an assigned mentor through daily operations and rotate through departments and receive specialized instruction, such as etiquette training. The Training Department, which is in charge of the program, works with multiple departments to set up a training schedule  Midshipmen stand conning officer watch on the bridge during replenishments-at-sea, attend navigation briefs and department head meetings, learn celestial navigation, experience helicopter operations, fast-roping and rappelling and actively participate in multiple other shipboard evolutions and watches.

"The training department is a great team. All personnel have had an active role in ensuring the
Midshipman Summer Cruise Training Program is a success," said Ward. "Preparing for the midshipmen, welcoming them aboard and monitoring their daily schedule has been a team effort." "I hope to gain from this experience an appreciation for a Sailor's work and daily life," said Midshipman 2nd Class Christian Merkel, from the University of Michigan. "As a division officer, I hope this experience will help me to better understand the lives of those working for me and allow me to lead them more effectively."

Lt. Cmdr. Patrick Copeland,
Enterprise's training officer, expressed his sentiments about their visit. "It has really been great interacting with the Navy's future leaders," said Copeland. "I am confident in their ability to lead and manage. This group of high quality individuals has impressed me with their motivation, spirit and intelligence." Enterprise is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting Maritime Security Operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120625-08 - Release Date: 6/25/2012 3:14:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Randy Savarese, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

 

Vicksburg Visits Bahrain

 

“Guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG-69) completed a regularly scheduled port visit to Bahrain on 28 May 2012.

Sailors had the chance to explore the rich culture in Bahrain, while continuing U.S. 5
th Fleet efforts to foster regional partnerships with locals in the country.

"Our Sailors displayed an incredible amount of professionalism ashore which can be directly linked to the positive relationship we have with Bahrain," said Lt. Cmdr. Noble Hetherington III, operations officer aboard
Vicksburg. "By interacting with the local Bahrainis, we impact their view of Americans."

They were able to take advantage of the naval facilities in Bahrain, although Sailors still stood duty and performed regular maintenance on equipment while in port.

"Sailors were excited to have access to things like the post office and Navy Exchange," said Hetherington. "Most ports we visit don't offer these facilities."

In addition to facilities on base, Sailors took part in
Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) tours such as go-cart racing, a beach barbeque at a local resort, fishing, a local water park and a Bahrain dolphin resort.

"I went to the beach barbeque," said Operations Specialist Seaman Derek Marsik, assigned to
Vicksburg. "I had a great time, it was the perfect place to relax and unwind."

Other Sailors took advantage of downtime and the city of Manama.

"I was impressed by the continued growth of the city since I was here last," said Operations Specialist 1st Class Tywone James. "This is the 12
th time I've been here and every one has been friendly every time I've visited. The facilities were even better than I remember them being and I definitely want to come back for the Formula One series one day."

Vicksburg is on its final deployment, operating with Enterprise Carrier Strike Group, and is slated to decommission in 2013.

Vicksburg is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting Maritime Security Operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as a part of Operation Enduring Freedom” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120601-10 - Release Date: 6/1/2012 10:05:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nick C. Scott, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, MANAMA, Bahrain (NNS)).

 

USS Porter Sailors Advanced

 

“Forty Sailors, including 20 new petty officers, were frocked on the flight deck of guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG-78) on 28 May 2012 after being selected to advance to the next rank.

Porter's
crew assembled on the flight deck to watch their shipmates, wearing their new crows and chevrons, receive their official frocking letters presented by the ship's commanding officer.

"It's a great day for all of our new 1st, 2nd, and 3rd class petty officers. The advancement examination process yields increased mission readiness as Sailors hit the books, and it is a real honor to be able to frock those that successfully advance each cycle," said Commander Martin Arriola,
Porter's commanding officer.

The newly frocked Sailors were congratulated by their shipmates following the ceremony after posing for group photos for friends and families back home.

Porter is currently deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting Maritime Security Operations cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120531-12 - Release Date: 5/31/2012 2:03:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Alex R. Forster Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS PORTER, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=67508

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) made a port of call at Khalifa Bin Salman Port, Bahrain from 20 to 27 May 2012 and then entered the Persian Gulf on the 28th” (Ref. 76).

 

Sailors and Marines aboard the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) participate in a memorial ceremony commemorating the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Midway.

 

120604-N-ZZ999-044 ARABIAN GULF (June 4, 2012) Sailors and Marines aboard the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65) participate in a memorial ceremony commemorating the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Midway. The previous USS Enterprise, CV-6, played a key role in the battle. Enterprise is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Intelligence Specialist Daniel B. Mayfield/Released)

 

Enterprise Commemorates the Battle of Midway

 

As reported on 4 June 2012 “Sailors and Marines aboard USS Enterprise (CVN-65) commemorated the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Midway with a ceremony conducted early in the morning on 4 June 2012, a fitting tribute given the ship's close ties to the battle. The previous USS Enterprise (CV-6), and her air wing played a vital role in the pivotal World War II battle that took place from 4 to 7 June 1942. The Battle of Midway is widely regarded as the turning point of the war in the Pacific.

"On this day in 1942, the entire complexion of the war in the Pacific changed," said Capt. William C. Hamilton, Jr.,
Enterprise's commanding officer, as he addressed the current Enterprise crew during the ceremony. "Thanks in no small part to the efforts of those serving aboard Enterprise." Along with Enterprise, aircraft carriers USS Hornet (CV-8) and USS Yorktown (CV-5), along with U.S. strike forces, defeated the Imperial Japanese navy carrier task force under the direction of commander in chief of the Japanese Combined Fleet, Adm. Yamamoto. Japanese losses during the battle were staggering.

 

The Japanese Navy lost all four of the large carriers that had attacked Pearl Harbor, a heavy cruiser, 248 carrier-based aircraft and over 3,000 lives, including 100 trained pilots who could not be replaced. Enterprise and her air wing were credited with three of the four Japanese carriers sunk that day at Midway. "We were not without losses of our own, however," said Rear Adm. Ted Carter, commander, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group. "Although Enterprise was not attacked during the battle, her air wing suffered the heaviest losses of any air wing at sea up to that point."

At the opening of the ceremony, Carter described the heroic roles of the Sailors and Marines who fought and died during the historic battle. "This morning, we pause for a few moments to reflect on the battle itself, the role each member of the Enterprise Strike Group played, and the sacrifices Sailors and Marines just like you made on those early days of June 1942," Carter told the crew. Hamilton, Commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1, Capt. Jeffrey L. Trent and Capt. Joseph J. Leonard, commodore, Destroyer Squadron 2, also spoke about the roles
Enterprise, the air wing and the destroyer strike group played during the battle.

"Knowing this is our legacy, it is an absolute honor and privilege to remember the heroes of the Battle of Midway aboard our nation's most historic and legendary aircraft carrier, a great warship with a longstanding bond with Destroyer Squadron Two," said Leonard. The partnership between
Enterprise and Destroyer Squadron 2 began at Midway 70 years ago and continues today.

 

As part of the commemoration, Enterprise's First Class Petty Officer Association, detailed by Command Master Chief Dwayne E. Huff, performed a wreath-laying ceremony on the fantail aboard the ship. The fallen Sailors and Marines were also honored with a 21-gun salute and the sounding of "Taps," played by Boatswain's Mate 1st Class Timothy Lumpkin. "While we look back on the incredible achievements of Midway and reflect on what it took for those Sailors to win, we should also look forward with great confidence," said Carter.

 

"Midway taught us that this strength is not built upon technology and training, but rather brave, passionate Sailors and Marines just like you." Aircraft assigned to CVW-1 performed a missing-man flyover formation June 3 to commemorate the aviators who lost during the battle. Throughout the course of the day Enterprise went on to announce a historical timeline recounting the events of the Battle of Midway over the ship's announcing system.

"You preserve and celebrate the rich history and tradition of
Enterprise," said Carter. "It is our past that has brought us to today and our past that will continue to shape our future," said Carter” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120604-04 - Release Date: 6/4/2012 12:34:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Britney N. Epps, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)). 

 

Enterprise Wins CNO Environmental Quality Award

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) received the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Environmental Quality Award on 5 June 2012, in recognition of the carrier's environmental protection programs and initiatives during fiscal year 2011. Lt. Caity Bourgoine received the award on behalf of Enterprise at a ceremony held at the United States Navy Memorial in Washington D. C. Lt. Robin M. Schubauer, Enterprise's assistant safety officer and afloat environmental protection coordinator, said the CNO Environmental Quality Award is given every year and it alternates between "big decks" and "small decks."

"This year two carriers won," said Schubauer. "The
Reagan won it for the west coast and Enterprise won it for the east coast." Enterprise submitted a package in November 2011, highlighting all of its environmental along with an endorsement letter from USS Enterprise Commanding Officer Capt. William C. Hamilton Jr., stating Enterprise Sailors are "committed to the reduction of harmful environmental emissions and discharges through sound management practices while continuing to meet every operational challenge placed before them."

The nomination package included accomplishments such as partnering with Naval Facilities Environmental to plan and organize a "pier environmental compliance training DVD." The DVD is now mandatory training for all Norfolk-based ships. Other accomplishments included the refurbishing of the ship's solid waste incinerator, which ensured proper and safe disposal of thousands of tons of hazardous trash and classified material, and air pollution control through the reduction of volatile organic content vapor and the use of closed-loop refrigerant charging and evacuation systems.

Enterprise was notified it had won the award via a letter from the deputy director, Energy and Environmental Readiness Division of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. The letter noted "Enterprise is being recognized for its efforts to protect the environment while ensuring mission readiness."

It was also mentioned that
Enterprise had won an award in this category in the fiscal year 2007 competition. "We make sure the ship is complying with EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) laws," said Damage Controlman 1st Class Jay C. Colston, USS Enterprise assistant safety leading petty officer and assistant afloat environmental protection coordinator. "The most basic step to ensuring environmental protection is making sure all of our people are properly trained and qualified to run the equipment and do their jobs."

Schubauer and Colston agreed that environmental protection is everyone's responsibility. "The thing about environmental protection is that it often involves the little things we do everyday," said Colston. "From separating your trash," said Schubauer. "To putting a lid back on you can of paint," said Colston. The two also agreed that winning the award is a huge honor for
Enterprise. Colston said it means the people and equipment aboard Enterprise are all working properly and the crew is consciously trying not to harm the environment.

Enterprise is a 50-year-old ship with greater challenges than some of the newer carriers when it comes to environmental protection. Colston said that this sets the Enterprise apart and makes it a real honor to have won the award. "Environmental protection is an all-hands effort," said Colston. "From the newest deck seaman to the admiral, everyone plays a part." "The Environmental Award is everyone's award" said Schubauer” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120608-02 - Release Date: 6/8/2012 5:37:00 AM - Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Gregory White, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

Big E Advances 253 to E-4

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) advanced 253 Sailors to petty officer 3rd class during a ceremony held in the ship's hangar bay on 8 June 2012. Sailors were individually recognized by Capt. William C. Hamilton Jr., the commanding officer (CO) of Enterprise, and CMDCM(AW/SW) Dwayne E. Huff, the ship's command master chief (CMC). Each Sailor received a frocking letter from the CO and a third class petty officer coin from the CMC.

 

As Enterprise continues its final deployment (based on deployments longer then a four months), the newly-frocked Sailors will take on increased responsibility. "As new (petty officers), the next step is understanding that they have a bigger level of responsibility," said Navy Counselor 1st Class Linda H. Gilmore. "Some of the things that they can do to prepare for the next months include getting with leadership for help regarding expectations, working with mentors, and having goals."

Many newly-frocked Sailors see the advancement to third class petty officer as a milestone in their naval careers. "This is a huge step for all of us," said Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) 3rd Class Douglas Meyer. "With the higher rank comes more responsibility. It's important that we remember that when we carry on our day-to-day jobs, that we set a good example for junior Sailors."

Along with the increased responsibility, the new petty officers will be tasked with educating junior Sailors so they also advance in rank. Many of the Sailors who advanced spent long hours studying rate-specific material for the exam. However, Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) 3rd Class Edward Witherspoon attributes his promotion to having leadership that took the time to better him as a Sailor. "It feels amazing to accomplish this," said Witherspoon. "I could not have done it without having strong leadership and an awesome mentor."

 

All of the Sailors who were frocked underwent a two-day Petty Officer Selectee Indoctrination Leadership Course during the past week where they learned what they can expect and what is expected of them now that they are petty officers."It feels great being able to finally put on a crow," said Meyer. "It shows me that hard work and dedication really do pay off."

Enterprise is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting Maritime Security Operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120610-04 - Release Date: 6/10/2012 7:12:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Brian G. Reynolds, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

 

USS Vicksburg Advances 44 Sailors

 

“Forty-four Sailors assigned to guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG-69) were advanced to the next rank in a frocking ceremony on the ship's flight deck on 9 June 2012. The six first class, 15 second class and 23 third class petty officers were advanced from their previous ranks after attending a five-day petty officer indoctrination course.

"[The course] exposes them to a lot of different leadership styles," said Chief Cryptologic Technician (Mechanical) (SW) James J. Theis, who coordinates the petty officer indoctrination course. "They are expected to be ready. [The course] doesn't tell you what to do, it gives you the tools you need to build your own leadership style."

With new rank comes new responsibilities for Sailors aboard
Vicksburg and they are expected to display a high level of professionalism. "I am looking forward to added responsibility," said newly frocked Sonar Technician (Surface) 2nd Class Eric Askea. "I've been hoping to advance for awhile, so I am mentally prepared. I am looking forward to learning new things about my job and about leadership in general."

One of the challenges that faces Sailors who advance is being senior to those that were once their peers. "A lot of people think that you just keep doing the same job for more money," said Askea. "It's more than that though, you take on more responsibility for your work and those you are junior to you." Many of the Sailors advancing will feel that responsibility for the first time.

"This is my first taste of responsibility," said newly frocked Gunner's Mate 3rd Class Steven C. Pender. "This is really the first rank where you start to learn about leadership. I've been just doing what I'm told since I came into the Navy, but now I will be expected to make some decisions on my own."

Vicksburg is on its final deployment and is currently operating in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting Maritime Security Operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as a part of Operation Enduring Freedom” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120611-04 - Release Date: 6/11/2012 10:55:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Nick C. Scott, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS VICKSBURG, At Sea (NNS)).

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was underway in the Persian Gulf from 28 May to 9 June 2012, en route to the North Arabian Sea, transiting the Strait of Hormuz and Gulf of Oman” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) transited the Strait of Hormuz (4th transit while on her deployment) and Gulf of Oman and then entered the North Arabian Sea on 11 June 2006” (Ref. 76).

 

Enterprise Celebrates Hosptial Corps' 114th Birthday

 

“Sailors and Marines aboard USS Enterprise (CVN-65) came together in the ship's hangar bay on 16 June 2012, to recognize hospital corpsmen and to celebrate the 114th birthday of the Navy's Hospital Corps. The event was organized by the medical staff to give the 4,600 Sailors and Marines aboard an historic overview of the Hospital Corps and to acknowledge, "the only enlisted corps in the Navy." "We want to let everyone know that we are proud of what we do," said Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Lestary Tiana Plair, Enterprise Hospital Corps celebration committee chairperson.

 

"If we keep our history in the forefront of our minds, then the service we provide on a daily basis will be impeccable," said Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Tivey D. Mathews, a surgical technician aboard Enterprise. The Hospital Corps was founded June 17, 1898, during the Spanish-American War. Since that time, Corpsmen have served in every war. They deploy around the world with Sailors and Marines to provide care at sea, in the air and on land. An ability to work in the middle of an active battlefield is a characteristic which pertains to few ratings in the Navy.

 

Hospital Corpsmen are one of the few rates that experience working in such an environment. "We have a lot of corpsmen that have been on the front line," said Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Crystal James Purnell, aerospace medicine technician aboard Enterprise. "That is [somewhat unusual] when we're talking about rates in the Navy." Hospital Corpsmen also hold more Medals of Honor than any other rate in the Navy. "We come from a long, proud heritage in which a lot of people have gone to war and paid the ultimate price," said Mathews.

 

Vice Adm. Matthew L. Nathan, U.S. Navy Surgeon General and chief, U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, wrote in his birthday message to the Hospital Corps released June 15th, "The Hospital Corps is the largest rating in the Navy and the most decorated in the United States. Twenty naval ships alone have been named after Hospital Corpsmen." Corpsmen are highly-trained, professional medical personnel who, together, cover all areas of health and medicine.

 

They work diligently to provide a highly necessary service to the fleet and Marines. Onboard Enterprise, that expertise is evident. "We perform daily sick call," said Plair. "We provide medical coverage for daily events and evolutions. Whether it's an OC (Oleoresin Capsicum, or Pepper) spray in the hangar bay or replenishment at sea, we provide medical support for the crew. That's what we are here for."

 

Corpsmen play a variety of roles in the naval community, and many have their own reason for wanting to provide health care to service members. "My father was a World War II vet and I saw him get the benefits of medical coverage up until the day he died," said Purnell. "I remember being in the hospital with him one day and seeing the corpsmen taking care of him. I thought to myself, 'This is why I do what I do.' We're taking care of our own." Mathews, Plair and Purnell all agree celebrating the Hospital Corps' 114th birthday aboard the historic Enterprise as it makes its final deployment is a huge honor and privilege.

 

"Honestly, even though we've received a lot of awards and medals for wars fought on land, our Hospital Corps did not originate on the battlefield," said Mathews. "It originated on sailing vessels. At sea is home for us and to be the last crew of corpsmen on the first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier is a big deal"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120617-04 - Release Date: 6/17/2012 9:44:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Gregory White, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

 

Vicksburg Performs Burial at Sea

 

“Sailors assigned to guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG-69) performed a burial at sea ceremony on 16 June 2012.

Twenty-one Sailors and civilians were laid to rest during the ceremony, the first of its kind during
Vicksburg's deployment.

Burial at sea is a longstanding tradition in the Navy, and peacetime burial at sea has been commonplace since after World War II.

A burial at sea may be requested through the Department of Decedent Affairs and a specific ship may be requested.

"The family has a lot of say in this," said Lt. Edsil Logan, command chaplain aboard
Vicksburg, who performed the service. "We make sure that we stay sensitive to the needs of the family and the desires of those being buried."

"Burial at sea makes us realize how precious life is and to not take family, friends and shipmates for granted," said Logan.

Two of the deceased were family members of the current
Vicksburg Sailors.

"I have performed eight burial at sea ceremonies," said Logan. "This is the first where we had family members who were able to participate."

The remains of retired Cmdr. Ray Schmidt were committed to the sea by his grandson,
Vicksburg Sailor, Operations Specialist 3rd Class Derek Marsik.

"I was glad that I was able to participate," said Marsik. "I felt very honored to be part of this tradition as well as carry on a legacy of service."

"I think it's important for ships to do burials at sea," said Fire Controlman 2nd Class George Decoste, command lay leader aboard
Vicksburg. "We are entrusted to carry on tradition and take time to pay respects to those who have sacrificed."

Vicksburg is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting Maritime Security Operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as a part of Operation Enduring Freedom” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120626-05 - Release Date: 6/26/2012 11:44:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Nick Scott, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS VICKSBURG, At Sea (NNS)).

 

USS James E. Williams transits the Red Sea.

 

120618-N-NL401-352 - RED SEA (June 18, 2012) - The guided-missile destroyer USS James E. Williams (DDG-95) transits the Red Sea. James E. Williams is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Daniel Meshel/Released)

 

The commander of Naval Air Forces Atlantic speaks to the crew aboard USS Enterprise.

 

120621-N-JC800-053 - ARABIAN SEA (June 21, 2012) - Rear Adm. Ted N. Branch, commander of Naval Air Forces Atlantic, speaks to the crew aboard the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65). Enterprise is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Heath Zeigler/Released)

 

Sailors aboard USS Enterprise (CVN 65) participate in a steel beach picnic on the ship's flight deck.

 

110622-N-OP638-099 - RED SEA (June 22, 2011) - Sailors aboard the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65) participate in a steel beach picnic on the ship's flight deck. Enterprise and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1 are conducting maritime security operations in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jesse L. Gonzalez/Released)

 

 

USS Enterprise Sailors Enjoy Steel Beach Picnic Viedo

 

USS Enterprise Hosts Steel Beach Picnic

 

“The first day of summer may not be until June 20 but, for the Sailors and Marines of USS Enterprise (CVN-65), the season seemed to be in full swing as the carrier held a "steel beach" picnic on 14 June 2012, on the ship's flight deck. The day's festivities included activities such as sumo suits, jousting, mini pools, water guns, trike races and a driving range (with bio-degradable golf balls). Grills run by the carrier's Mustang Association were churning out hot dogs, burgers and chicken while bands and DJ's, "moved the crowd."

This kind of event takes a great deal of coordination to pull off given the logistics involved and the number of Sailors and Marines aboard
Enterprise. Lt. Cmdr. Jason Endress, Enterprise's Principal Assistant for Services, was one of the individuals charged with bringing the first "steel beach" picnic of the carrier's final deployment to fruition. "It took a lot of coordination between all the departments," said Endress. "[The aircraft handling officer] gave us the space on the flight deck and helped us with the elevator runs so we could get all of our grills, tables and food up here.

 

Engineering and Combat Systems helped us with the sound systems, and all the electrical and MWR and food services set up and manned the event." The Mustang Association provided the grilling manpower necessary to serve up food to more than 4,600 Sailors and Marines on the flight deck. "The Mustang Association wanted to give the crew a break - especially the food service attendants - and just mingle and let the enlisted Sailors know what the LDO (limited duty officer) program is all about," said Lt. Harry Adair, assistant flight deck officer and one of several Mustangs manning the grills on the flight deck.

Events like these are meant to improve the crew's morale and strengthen the bonds between the Sailors and Marines aboard
Enterprise. "Everyone is out here working seven days a week for the entire time we are out at sea. Even though port visits have been kind of frequent, they are still not frequent enough to count as having weekends and holidays where you get to go to your own BBQ's and have your own relaxing days," said Megan Villapudua, Enterprise "Fun Boss. "It's important to get everyone out here and show them that we appreciate them. That's what Morale Welfare and Recreation (MWR) is here for." Despite the massive coordination that went into planning the event, it seemed to be worth the effort due to the impact it had on the morale of the crew.

"We have to make sure they (the crew) get time off every now and then to blow off some steam, dance, listen to some good music, eat some good food and enjoy each others' camaraderie," said Endress. Whether they were working the event or just enjoying the festivities, it seems the steel beach picnic was a big hit among the crew. "This was my first steel beach and it was very entertaining," said Lance Cpl. Adrian Robinson, assigned to the Thunderbolts of Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 251. "I had a good time and I think it really boosted everyone's morale"” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS120616-02 - Release Date: 6/16/2012 11:06:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Randy J. Savarese, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

 

A Photo Worth A Thousand Words

 

“Aviation ordnancemen (AO) assigned to USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1 came together on 22 June 2012 for a photo on the flight deck spelling out the name of a young boy diagnosed with terminal cancer.

Dyrk Burcie was three years old when he was diagnosed with pediatric liver cancer, and despite nine rounds of chemotherapy and a liver transplant, his prognosis is still grim. The photo is part of what has become a spontaneous campaign intended to bring some happiness and comfort to his family during their time of need.

This unique campaign began with one act of kindness from the Dallas Fire Department, where Dameon Burcie, Dyrk's father, works. To show support for their fellow fire fighter, Dameon's coworkers got together and took a photo with personnel and fire trucks forming the shape of the boy's name. This thoughtful gesture spread to other fire departments, which began creating their own photos.

Enterprise became involved when Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Julian Medina, a forklift technician assigned to Weapons Department's G-1 Division, received an e-mail from his brother, a Dallas fire fighter who works with Dameon Burcie. The letter described the boy's story and asked if something similar could be done aboard the aircraft carrier.

"When my brother e-mailed me the story, I wanted to get involved," said Medina. "That's when I (brought the idea to) Chief Warrant Officer James Yager, and he took it from there." "Medina approached me with a story of a young boy from Dallas who was dying from cancer, and asked me if we could do something," said Chief Warrant Officer James Yager, air gunner with weapons department's
G-1 Division.

 

"So I contacted Aviation Ordnancemen from the ship's company and the air wing and got them together to do this photo on the flight deck so we could send it back to the family." With a helicopter already in the air on a routine flight, the group of AOs had just 45 minutes to form the letters that would spell out Dyrk's name using only a drawing from Yager. In total, approximately 300 AOs showed up to help.

The outpouring of participation in this touching tribute was felt by everyone involved in the spelling of his name. "It's an awesome feeling to know you're helping someone," said Medina. "Even though it was just a 45-minute [photo] shoot for us on the flight deck, everyone knew what it was for and knew it was going to make a big impact on this one child's life."

A photo, which was born out of a basic desire to bring some sense of happiness to a child's life, spread quickly through the ranks of fire departments in Texas and has now touched down on the flight deck of
Enterprise. Though one of Enterprise's own Sailors is connected to Dyrk's father, Yager believes this shared experience also highlights the brotherhood of those who serve and protect every American. "Ever since 9/11 I just feel like the military, the fire department and police have become more of a tight-knit group," said Yager. "We all support each other and we're all out to accomplish the same goals.

 

This was definitely an instance where we could all come together to make a difference in someone's life." "Anything like this, if he was my child and I got this kind of support from people, I know I would appreciate it," said Yager. "I have a soft spot in my heart for children and I thought this would be a good thing to do for him and his family"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120624-04 - Release Date: 6/24/2012 9:54:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Randy J. Savarese, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

 

Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic Visits “Big E”

 

The commander of Naval Air Force Atlantic visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) frrom 21 to 22 June 22012 while the ship was underway in the Arabian Sea supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.

Rear Adm. Ted N. Branch arrived aboard
Enterprise to hear firsthand from Sailors about how well they are able to execute their mission and to identify any concerns or challenges they face while deployed. Branch met with officers, chiefs and junior enlisted Sailors in an effort to better understand issues at all levels.

"
Enterprise is a national treasure," said Branch. "I'm glad to come out here, see you and be able to share in some of your glory on this deployment." After arriving aboard the “Big E,” Branch was greeted by the visit's hosts, Rear Adm. Walter E. Carter, commander of Enterprise Carrier Strike Group (ENTCSG), Capt. William C. Hamilton, Jr., commanding officer of Enterprise, and Capt. Jeffrey L. Trent, commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1.

Shortly after his arrival, Branch conducted an all-hands call in the ship's hangar bay where he addressed the crew. "
Enterprise has been around for nearly half of naval aviation's history and you continue to make good news happen all the time," said Branch. "To be on this 50-plus year-old warship, out here supporting Carrier Air Wing 1 and doing the job you guys are doing day in and day out, every day, under very tough conditions, and meeting the mark every day is just phenomenal."

Branch also expressed his appreciation for the hard work of the crew and the success of the carrier's current deployment thus far. "The reason for that success is you," said Branch. "All of you who are on the team, pulling the load every day. It's a great team out here and you guys are knocking it out of the park on a consistent basis."

Branch also answered questions from Sailors about the future of the ship and what they should expect upon their return to homeport. "It was great to hear firsthand that while we are deployed, a whole team of folks are making preparations back home for our inactivation," said Lt. Cmdr. Jon Styers, assistant strike operations officer aboard
Enterprise. "It makes our homecoming and the eventual inactivation of this historic ship a bittersweet reality."

During his stay aboard
Enterprise, Branch met with ECSG, Enterprise and CVW-1 leadership, toured some of the ship's spaces, and ate dinner with junior Sailors on the mess decks. He also ate breakfast with the Chiefs Mess and toured Enterprise's reactor and engineering spaces” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120622-06 - Release Date: 6/22/2012 10:54:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class(SW) Kristin L. Grover, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

 

Aviation ordnancemen stand together for a photo on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) to spell out

 

120622-N-JV638-097 - ARABIAN SEA (June 23, 2012) - Aviation ordnancemen stand together for a photo on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65) to spell out "Dyrk", the name of a young boy from Texas diagnosed with terminal pediatric cancer. Enterprise is deployed to the U.S. 5th fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Randy J. Savarese/Released)

 

USS Nitze Arrives in Seychelles

 

“Guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG-94) arrived in Victoria, Seychelles, for a port visit on 24 June 2012.

The visit serves as an opportunity for the crew to relax after being at sea for more than a month.

"The crew has been working hard, providing maritime security in a difficult area of the world to operate," said Cmdr. Christopher Nerad,
Nitze's commanding officer. "Everyone is very excited to relax and engage with the local people."

Command Master Chief Bill Arbuckle was also enthusiastic about the visit.

"This is a great opportunity for us to see a part of the world most of us have not seen before," said Arbuckle. "The crew is excited about this visit."

While in the Seychelles, the crew will have opportunities to participate in a variety of activities arranged by the ship's
Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) committee, including snorkeling, nature trail tours and a tour of one of the Marine National Parks of the Seychelles.

The visit is an opportunity to get to know a different culture before continuing operations in the U.S. 5
th Fleet area of responsibility.

"Some rest and relaxation is going to be good for everyone," said Nerad. "Then the crew will be ready to get back into the area of operation and continue our mission."

Nitze is deployed as part of the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting Maritime Security Operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120627-03 - Release Date: 6/27/2012 5:37:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeff Atherton, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, VICTORIA, Seychelles (NNS)).

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was underway in the North Arabian Sea from 11 to 29 June 2012, entering the Persian Gulf Gulf Gulf through Gulf of Oman and Strait of Hormuz (5 th transit while on her deployment) and then entered the Persian Gulf on the 30th” (Ref. 76).


USS Enterprise (CVN-65) pulled in for a port of call at Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates on 1 July 2012” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) made a port of call at Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates from 1 to 4 July 2012 and then entered the Persian Gulf” (Ref. 76).

 

"Cooks from the Valley" Feed Sailors aboard James E. Williams

 

“The "Cooks From the Valley" organization treated Sailors aboard guided-missile destroyer USS James E. Williams (DDG-95) to more than 400 pounds of Prime-USDA, New York steaks on 4 July 2012.

Walter Fisher, a member of "Cooks From the Valley," arrived aboard
James E. Williams to offer his thanks and express his appreciation for the crew.

For Fisher, the trip was about both celebrating Independence Day as well as bringing a touch of home to the Sailors deployed aboard
James E. Williams.

"This truly is just a token of appreciation, but it's a relatively small token of appreciation for all that they do," said Fisher. "So, we try to bring a little bit of home [to them] since [they] can't go home."

The steaks are brought ready for shipment to Naval Air Station Lemoore, and were loaded into military transport aircraft, flown with the members of "Cooks from the Valley" and then delivered to service members abroad.

"It's unbelievable the amount of coordination it takes to put this together," said Fisher. "From the time you purchase steaks, fly them half way around the world and coordinate with all the ships... it is extreme."

Wearing a
Williams' ball-cap and apron over sturdy work-jeans, Fisher single-handedly grilled more than 300 steaks for the crew amidst the heavy listing and pitching of the ship as it transited the Arabian Sea.

"I don't live that far from the coast in California, and I was hanging out the past couple of months hoping that you'd come by and I'd buy you a steak, but you never showed," said Fisher jokingly to Sailors. "So I tracked you down over here, and now I'll feed you over here."

"Cooks from the Valley" is an organization comprised of philanthropic professionals who purchase high-grade steak out-of-pocket, travel to wherever military personnel are located, fire up the grill and prepare meals for service members free-of-charge.

James E. Williams is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting Maritime Security Operations, theater security cooperation efforts and supporting missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120706-04 - Release Date: 7/6/2012 11:54:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Daniel J. Meshel, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS JAMES E. WILLIAMS, At Sea (NNS)).

 

'Cooks from the Valley' Grill Up Steaks Aboard the “Big E”

 

“Members of the non-profit organization "Cooks from the Valley" volunteered their time and resources to treat the Sailors and Marines aboard USS Enterprise (CVN-65) to steaks hot off the grill while the ship was underway in the Arabian Gulf on 5 July 2012.

The volunteers purchased, transported, cooked and served more than 5,000 New York strip steaks in an effort to boost crew morale and show appreciation for the dedicated service of the Sailors and Marines of the
"Big E."

"We buy the steaks, ship the steaks out, marinate them, grill them and hear over and over again from the Sailors and Marines how much they appreciate a piece of home, just from these steaks," said Thomas Anton, founder of "Cooks from the Valley."

The organization is comprised of more than 100 volunteers, all sharing a common desire to give back to men and women serving in the U.S. military. "It's a very fulfilling and rewarding experience to give back," said George Rach, a volunteer with "Cooks from the Valley." "These guys are out here serving our country and we want to say thank you."

The event came a day after the Independence Day holiday and highlighted the ship's deployment. "I know it's not the Fourth of July, but it sure does feel like it," said Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) Airman Amanda Maisonave. "The steaks were great and really tender. I am really happy that they volunteered their time to serve us."

"We have volunteers from judges to construction workers," said Victoria Harrison, project coordinator and volunteer with "Cooks from the Valley." "A lot of help was needed in a short period of time to make this happen and it is really appreciated."

The organization can be traced back to the events of 9/11 and the desire of private citizens to give back to those defending their nation. "Cooks from the Valley" relies on contributions from each and every volunteer. In order to accomplish this event, volunteers each donated approximately $2,900.00 to purchase and ship the steaks.

The organization tries to host these events twice a year to commemorate Independence Day and Veterans Day. Eight volunteers from the organization along with members from the First Class Petty Officers Association and the ship's culinary specialists aboard Enterprise worked in unison to make the event a success."We love them [service members] dearly for the commitment that they show," said Rach. "This is our way of showing our appreciation."

Enterprise is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting Maritime Security Operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120709-11 - Release Date: 7/9/2012 3:18:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Gregory Pickett, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

 

HS-11 Conducts Aerial Change of Command

 

“Cmdr. Ryan Keys relieved Cmdr. Edgardo "Cheech" Moreno as commanding officer (CO) of the Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron (HS) 11 Dragonslayers in an airborne change-of-command ceremony in the skies above deployed USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 6 July 2012. The ceremony began on the flight deck as Moreno addressed the crew of HS-11, offering his appreciation and gratitude to the squadron he had led. "You are my family," said Moreno. "I have nothing but love and respect for all of you."

Moreno also expressed a deep honor for having the opportunity to lead the Dragonslayers. "When you say 'take care of your people,' that's easier said than done," said Moreno. "You have to do a lot to take care of your people. The first thing you have to do is lead from the front." Following the airborne portion of the ceremony, which included a ceremonial "lead change" carried out by Keys and Moreno, Keys took center stage and addressed the crew as the new commanding officer of HS-11.

"We will continue the Dragonslayer traditions of mission accomplishment, safe flying and mentorship," said Keys. "Every person in this command plays a critical role on this team and must respect each other." Keys, the previous executive officer of HS-11, then offered his thanks to Moreno for setting a favorable leadership example for him to follow. "Thanks Cheech, for all that you've done for the squadron for the past two-and-a-half years," said Keys. "You didn't tell me how to be a good CO. You showed me how to be an outstanding CO."

Capt. Jeffrey Trent, commander of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1, also addressed the HS-11 crew, expressing gratitude for a job well done by Moreno and welcoming Keys as the new commanding officer. "He [Moreno] cares deeply about his people," said Trent. "He holds his people accountable. Most importantly, he loves you Dragonslayers."

"I know he (Keys) will continue to take the Dragonslayers to bigger and better heights," added Trent. This deployment will be the final deployment for any squadron embarked aboard
Enterprise, as the ship is scheduled to be decommissioned following its return to homeport in Norfolk. Consequently, this makes the last in-flight change of command the Dragonslayers will ever conduct aboard Enterprise.

"It feels bittersweet, but I am honored to have had the opportunity to do an airborne change of command on this final historic deployment of the
“Big E," said Moreno. Moreno will go on to attend the National Defense University in Washington, D.C.
With the completion of the change of command, HS-11 pilots will continue to fly combat missions in support of
Operation Enduring Freedom in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility.

"I would like to say that it has been an absolute privilege to serve with each and every one of my Dragonslayers," said Moreno. "I am fortunate to have had the opportunity to serve with such a phenomenal group of consummate professionals"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120706-05 - Release Date: 7/6/2012 12:47:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Brian G. Reynolds, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

Sailors prepare an inline educator for use on a simulated flooding casualty during a general quarters drill.

 

120707-N-TG831-079 - SOUTH CHINA SEA (July 7, 2012) - Seaman Peter Tassani, left, and Seaman Brittany Burke prepare an inline educator for use on a simulated flooding casualty during a general quarters drill aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS McCampbell (DDG-85). McCampbell is forward deployed to Yokosuka, Japan, and is underway in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Declan Barnes/Released)

 

Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7 fly over the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69).

 

120710-N-RY232-518 - MEDITERRANEAN SEA (July 10, 2012) - Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7 fly over the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69). Dwight D. Eisenhower is on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Julia A. Casper/Released)

 

Big E” Begins" Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions Program

 

“Service members aboard USS Enterprise (CVN-65) formed a Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) committee aboard the ship on 10 July 2012.

CSADD is a peer-to-peer mentoring program geared toward assisting Sailors in making positive decisions in all areas of their lives. The program was originally created for those in ROTC, JROTC and similar programs. However, it quickly spread throughout the Navy and is now a resource for all Sailors.

Enterprise Command Master Chief Dwayne E. Huff, initiated the organization of the program aboard the carrier after attending a number of captain's masts which he felt could have been prevented if the Sailors involved were better informed before making the decisions that landed them in trouble. "I believe that if Sailors have a program like CSADD and the mentorship that it offers, we will all benefit from it," said Huff. "I've been involved in the program at previous commands and I've seen how successful it can be when it is utilized correctly."

The purpose of the program is peer mentorship. The goals of its members are to get a group of Sailors who, through networking and discussion, can create ways to inform and inspire others to make better decisions, and to equip all hands with the tools they need to make those decisions.

"Once fully organized and established, we will meet weekly to put together ideas to help with the message we're driving to our Sailors," wrote Gunner's Mate 2nd Class Kyle T. Gregory, a member of CSADD, in an e-mail to the other members of the coalition.

The coalition has different topics they want to focus on every month in an effort to raise awareness about these issues. Topics range from addressing problems such as sexual assault to everyday issues such as car buying. "Once or twice a month we will give training to the command via posters, skits, departmental training, etc.," wrote Gregory.

"With a program like CSADD in place Sailors have an option to ask questions and gain perspective before making decisions that could affect them in an unexpected manner," said Huff. "If we get the volunteers needed to get involved and get this program off of the ground, and if we gain interest from Sailors in utilizing the tools we offer, then the program can be a real success here."

Huff said that he believes CSADD will help Sailors make informed decisions, build trust and develop healthier relationships. It may not totally alleviate certain problems but it will definitely help.

CSADD recently held its first meeting and plan to meet at least once per month throughout the rest of deployment” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS120713-01 - Release Date: 7/13/2012 4:48:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Gregory White, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

 

Enterprise Sailors Visit HMCS Charlottetown

 

“Five Sailors from USS Enterprise (CVN-65) visited Royal Canadian Navy frigate HMCS Charlottetown (FFG-339) for a scheduled cross-training event on 11 July 2012.

The event, which followed a visit by
Charlottetown Sailors to Enterprise in May, promoted improving communication, interoperability and partnership between navies with a shared goal of providing maritime security.

"We welcome these opportunities to reaffirm and shore up our ability to operate with coalition partners," said Lt. Matt Low, Weapons Officer aboard
Charlottetown.

"Warships are generally more effective working in a Task Group. This requires operators with sharpened skill sets," said Low. "Encounters such as this allow us to maintain our war-fighting skills, while executing a mission which requires us to operate independently a large percentage of the time."

During their visit, the
Enterprise Sailors were able to speak with their Canadian counterparts about the frigate's operations, and received a tour of the ship.

Charlottetown
is deployed conducting counter-terrorism operations in the Arabian Sea.

Enterprise is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting Maritime Security Operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120720-15 - Release Date: 7/20/2012 11:43:00 AM - By Lt.j.g. Brynn Olson, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

 

The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65), left, and the guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG-69), right, conduct a replenishment at sea with the Military Sealift Command fast combat support ship USNS Supply (T-AOE 6).

 

120712-N-KG934-036 - GULF OF OMAN (July 12, 2012) - The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65), left, and the guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG-69), right, conduct a replenishment at sea with the Military Sealift Command fast combat support ship USNS Supply (T-AOE-6). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Terrence Siren/Released)

 

USS Vicksburg Passes Halfway Point

 

As reported on 12 July 2012, “Sailors assigned to guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG-69) passed their deployment's halfway point the first week of July. This marks a significant milestone in the 20-year-old cruiser's final deployment.

"It's definitely been an interesting deployment so far," said Cryptologic Technician (Technical) Seaman Roger Coleman, who is on his first deployment. "I've learned a lot and visited a lot of places I've never seen before and I'm looking forward to visiting more."

Vicksburg has visited three ports so far this deployment including Greece, United Arab Emirates and Bahrain.

"This deployment has helped me grow as a Sailor," said Culinary Specialist 2nd Class Christopher Sims, who is on his fourth deployment. "I learn new things about my job and about the Navy every day. No matter how many deployments you go on, you can always learn more and improve your skills."

During the first half of deployment, 18
Vicksburg Sailors earned their Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist pin and more than 100 are poised to earn it before the end of deployment.

The
Vicksburg crew marked the halfway point by sending a video made by the crew to Mayport, Fla., for friends and family to view.

They also celebrated the halfway mark by holding a steak cookout for Sailors July 5.

This is scheduled to be
Vicksburg's final deployment before decommissioning in 2013. Vicksburg is on its final deployment operating in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting Maritime Security Operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as a part of Operation Enduring Freedom” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120712-07 - Release Date: 7/12/2012 11:40:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Nick Scott, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS Vicksburg, At Sea (NNS)).

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was underway in the Persian Gulf from 5 to 11 July 2012, en route to the North Arabian Sea via the Strait of Hormuz (6th transit of her deployment) and entered the Gulf of Oman on the 12th” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) steamed from the Persian Gulf, transiting the Strait of Hormuz (6th transit while on her deployment) and entered the Gulf of Oman on 12 July 2012 and the North Arabian Sea on the 13th” (Ref. 76).

 

Enterprise Conducts Mass Casualty Drill

 

“The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted a mass casualty drill on 13 July 2012 as part of a continued commitment to mission readiness. A mass casualty is any instance in which the level of casualties is greater than the Medical Department alone can support. "This could be anywhere from 10 to 100 people," said Lt. Darcy Guerricagoitia, Enterprise's nurse. "It depends on the injuries, resources and personnel available. It enables us to exercise and evaluate the ship's response during a mass casualty scenario."

During a mass casualty, there are four levels of casualties used by Medical personnel to categorize the injured who are then taken to one of four corresponding triage stations. "For example, a red casualty requires immediate medical attention and will not survive if not seen relatively soon," said Guerricagoitia. "Any compromise to the casualty's airway, hemorrhage control or untreated shock could be fatal."

Another aspect of a mass casualty event is the activation of the walking blood bank. The walking blood bank is comprised of a minimum of 300 people - or, at least 10 percent of the ship's company - who are enrolled and eligible to donate blood in the event of a mass casualty. "Right now, we have 333 people enrolled," said Guerricagoitia. "Ideally, everyone would be a member of the walking blood bank. It can save your life and the life of your shipmate."

A mass casualty event doesn't just affect the
Medical Department, as the cause of such massive damage and injury is generally a ship-wide catastrophe. In addition to Medical, the drill involved the Air Department Training Team and Security. The Medical Department hopes to incorporate more departments in the future. During the drill, several scenarios were played out to test the readiness of the crew. One of these scenarios included an aircraft fire in the hangar bay. After the fire was distinguished, but reflashed injuring 13 people.

"We, the Medical Training Team, are not only evaluating the
Medical Department's response to the casualties, we are also evaluating the ship's response," said Guerricagoitia. The main focus of a drill like this is mission readiness and the overall ability of Enterprise to carry out its operational missions in the event of a mass casualty. "Yes, it is a training requirement to do mass casualty drills," said Guerricagoitia. "It is also important to assess our preparedness as a ship to deal with a mass casualty."

Needless to say, real-life situations like the one played out during the drill are not unheard of. Guerricagoitia believes that it is imperative that the ship's crew be able to act - and act swiftly - in the event that a worst-case scenario occurs.

 

"This is important," said Guerricagoitia. "There is certainly the potential for it to happen. Communication, participation, knowledge and safety are all important in the drill, and during a real event"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120714-02 - Release Date: 7/14/2012 9:07:00 AM - Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Brian G. Reynolds, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

 

An aircraft takes off from the flight deck.

 

120714-N-AP176-079 - ARABIAN SEA (July 14, 2012) - An aircraft takes off from the flight deck of aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65). Enterprise is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeff Atherton/Released)

 

Enterprise Celebrates Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month

 

“Sailors and Marines aboard USS Enterprise (CVN-65) celebrated Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Heritage Month in the ship's hangar bay on 18 May 2012. Celebrated across the nation during May, Asian American and Pacific Islanders Heritage Month is a celebration of Asians and Pacific Islanders living in the U.S.

Enterprise's Multicultural Heritage Committee (MCHC) was responsible for planning and hosting the observance as the aircraft carrier continues its final deployment. The observance focuses on this year's theme: "Striving for Excellence in Leadership, Diversity, and Inclusion."

"This celebration is about bringing together all the different ethnicities of Asian countries and to represent their cultures," said Hospital Corpsman 1st Class John Julian, a member of
Enterprise's Multi-Cultural Heritage Committee.

 

The show included dances, songs, informational speech, a poetry reading and a "Haka," from Samoa, an island nation in the South Pacific. "A Haka is basically a war chant," said Chief Aviation Structural Mechanic Lorraine Marie C. Secord, a member of Enterprise's Multi-Cultural Heritage Committee. "The chant was created as a way to intimidate enemies."

The dance portion of the show included Hula, an interpretive dance style from the South Pacific. "There is a lot of diversity in the Asian and Pacific Island countries," said Julian. "Of course, you have the big countries that everyone knows like China and Japan but you also have smaller countries, like Thailand, and a lot of islands that many people have never even heard about."

Lt. j.g. Hosannah R. Quino, the master of ceremonies for the event, said the observance is a celebration for everyone and that it can serve as a great learning experience for the entire crew. "When I first joined the U.S. Navy I wasn't sure how diverse it really was," said Quino. "When you start seeing events like this, it makes you feel like the Navy, and America as a whole, is embracing you and your culture. It gives you that sense of home. I'm very excited about this, seeing the dances and hearing the songs and poems. I like trying different foods and learning about different cultures. It's kind of magical."

"It's nice to know peoples' backgrounds and origins," said Secord. "It's just interesting and our military is so diverse." Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month was first introduced in 1977, when U.S. Reps. Frank Horton and Norman Y. Mineta introduced a resolution that called upon the President to proclaim the first 10 days of May as Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Week.

A year later, in 1978, then-President Jimmy Carter signed a joint resolution designating its annual celebration. May was chosen for the AAPI Heritage observance to commemorate the immigration of the first Japanese people to the United States May 7, 1843, and to mark the anniversary of the completion of the transcontinental railroad May 10, 1869. Much of the work on this railroad was completed by Chinese immigrants.

 

In 1990, then-President George H. W. Bush signed an extension, making the weeklong celebration into a month-long celebration. Enterprise is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting Maritime Security Operations, theater security cooperation efforts and Operation Enduring Freedom missions” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120522-17 - Release Date: 5/22/2012 4:21:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Gregory White, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

 

MDSU-1 Conducts Survey of Rogue Buoy

 

“Guided-missile destroyer USS James E. Williams (DDG-95) hosted Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit 1 (MDSU-1), Company 1-5, as they conducted a salvage survey of a mooring buoy found adrift in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility on 18 July 2012.

MDSU-1 was tasked by Commander, Task Force (CTF) 56 to conduct the survey, a visual and photographic inspection above and below water, as the buoy poses a navigational hazard to nearby vessels.

"The buoy is a hazard to navigation," said Senior Chief Navy Diver William Phillips, master diver of Company 1-5. "We'll take the salvage survey back and develop a plan to remove the hazard to ensure U.S. naval, foreign-allied and shipping vessels are not damaged."

James E. Williams supported MDSU-1, Company 1-5, by hosting and transporting members via rigid-hull inflatable boat to the buoy, where they were able to conduct the survey.

"We inspect for anti-terrorism force protection (ATFP), structural integrity, and associated equipment attached to the buoy to ensure it's safe to salvage," said Phillips. "We're also looking for identifying marks to locate proper ownership of the buoy and accompanying items."

MDSU-1, based out of Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, is able to rapidly deploy at a moment's notice anywhere in the world to conduct a wide variety of dive operations.

"We're capable of performing salvage, underwater cutting and welding, emergency ship's husbandry, towing, harbor clearance and underwater demolition," said Phillips.

MDSU-1 is deployed to the U.S. 5
th Fleet area of responsibility.

James E. Williams is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting Maritime Security Operations, theater security cooperation efforts and supporting missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120723-09 - Release Date: 7/23/2012 1:07:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Daniel Meshel, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Final Foreign Water Fleet Deployment

 

Part I of VI (10 February to 26 March 2012)

Part II of VI (27 March to 12 May 2012)

Part III of VI (12 May to 18 July 2012)

Part IV of VI (19 July to 21 September 2012)

Part V of VI (22 September to 3 November 2012)

Part VI of VI (4 November 2012)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Final Foreign Water Fleet Deployment

Part III of VI (12 May to 18 July 2012)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIER SHIP

HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619