USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Final Foreign Water Fleet Deployment

 

Part I of VI (10 February to 26 March 2012)

Part II of VI (27 March to 12 May 2012)

Part III of VI (12 May to 18 July 2012)

Part IV of VI (19 July to 21 September 2012)

Part V of VI (22 September to 3 November 2012)

Part VI of VI (4 November 2012)

 

Enterprise Completes Successful Month long Underway

 

 

“Sailors aboard USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia on 10 February 2012 after completing a month of crucial pre-deployment qualifications and certifications at sea from 2 to 9 February 2012. During the past month, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Sailors and Marines participated in three major workup exercises: a Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX), a Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) and exercise Bold Alligator 2012 - the largest naval amphibious exercise conducted in more than a decade from 11 to 29 January 2012. The exercises mark the final steps in the 50-year-old carrier's preparation for its 22nd and final scheduled deployment. The culmination of months of training since Enterprise concluded its last deployment in July 2011, the exercises presented various scenarios and situations the Enterprise crew may face while deployed. "These exercises are important because they allow us to evaluate our ability to accomplish the very missions we will be called upon to complete during deployment," said Rear Adm. Walter E. Carter, commander, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group. "Over the past month we have trained as a strike group and have shown that we are more than capable, as a team, to succeed across the full spectrum of warfare capabilities." The complex scenarios and missions required hard work and dedication at all levels, from the strike group's most senior leadership to the youngest Sailors on the deckplates, experiencing their first underway period. The exercises are designed to involve every warfare area and ensure each Sailor and Marine knows their role to the fullest. "The “Big E” crew did an outstanding job this underway," said Master Chief Aviation Boatswain's Mate Eric J. Young, Enterprise's acting command master chief. "Our Sailors and Marines were really put to the test, and they answered those challenges without hesitation. I am very proud of their performance and look forward to deploying with such a motivated team." COMPTUEX, which occupied the first three weeks of the underway, was the first critical test for the strike group to operate together as a cohesive team. Evaluators from Commander, Strike Force Training, Atlantic grade the strike group's overall combat readiness by simulating the occupation of an area with high tensions existing between fictional countries in scenarios loosely based on real world geo-political conditions. "It's important to practice operating under these conditions so we're ready when the time comes to do it all for real, whether it's against pirates or other enemies," said Cmdr. James Midkiff, operations officer for Enterprise Carrier Strike Group. During the scenario-based training, strike group ships encountered threats including small boat attacks, mines, strait transits through hostile waters, aircraft, surface and submarine threats, as well as internal damage control and security threat drills. After accomplishing its tasks, evaluators then certified the strike group for open ocean operations. "I'm extremely proud of how all the Sailors and Marines of the Enterprise, Carrier Air Wing 1, and DESRON 2 team performed during the exercise," said Carter.  "The crews' performance during these exercises inspires in me a great sense of confidence that the Enterprise's final deployment will be both memorable and successful." The last week of the month-long underway included both the JTFEX and Bold Alligator 2012 exercises. More than 14,000 personnel from the U.S., France, Great Britain, Canada and other countries joined together in a massive joint exercise involving at least 25 ships. The exercises involved scenarios that required the rapid development of defense strategies to defeat a fictional enemy in an ever-evolving combat climate. The exercises concluded with the launch of a massive amphibious raid from several ships to bring the fictional enemy to their ultimate demise. "We flew 107 sorties [in one day] from Enterprise to support the amphibious landing, which is an amazing feat for our air wing, flight deck crew and maintenance crews that keep things running the way they should," said Midkiff. "It was a great example of our surge capacity and highlighted the key role that a Carrier Strike Group plays in such crucial operations. It's remarkable what we've accomplished as a strike group in such a short period of time - and I have no doubt that we're ready to deploy." In the midst of all the combat training scenarios, Enterprise also played a secondary role. During the last month, Sailors and Marines aboard Enterprise demonstrated the capabilities of the Navy's first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier and its crew to more than 200 distinguished visitors, including the secretary of defense, chief of naval operations, master chief petty officer of the Navy, chairman and vice chairman of the House Armed Services Committee and other representatives from Congress, Department of Defense, and Navy leadership. Enterprise departed its homeport of Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia on 11 January 2012, to participate in a COMPTUEX and JTFEX. The early morning departure was the next to last departure from Naval Station Norfolk for the 50-year-old carrier. Enterprise is scheduled to enter deactivation after completing its final deployment later this year. Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON)(SS/SW) Rick D. West visited Enterprise on 12 January 2012 while the ship was underway in the Atlantic Ocean. The visit showcased the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group and provided Sailors with an opportunity to interact with the Navy's senior leadership. While aboard, the CNO and MCPON dined with junior Sailors, met with Enterprise's leadership, toured several of the ship's spaces and addressed the crew at an all-hands call in the hangar bay. Religious Ministries Division (RMD) aboard Enterprise began offering the United Through Reading program to all crew members while underway for COMPTUEX on 13 January 2012. United Through Reading is a program designed to allow service members to keep in touch with their children by reading to them on video. "The United Through Reading program is an awesome tool used to connect Sailors, Marines and other service members to their children and families while on deployment," said Chief Religious Programs Specialist Terry A. Burrell, RMD's leading chief petty officer and United Through Reading coordinator on Enterprise. While underway in the Atlantic Ocean on 14 January 2012, Sailors and Marines assigned to Enterprise paused to remember the catastrophic fire that took place on its flight deck in 1969. Capt. William C. Hamilton Jr., commanding officer of Enterprise, addressed the crew over the ship's intercom system while closed circuit TV aired a specially prepared memorial video. The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS James E Williams (DDG-95) is participating in a COMPTUEX while underway in the Atlantic Ocean on 16 January 2016 to certify the ship for its upcoming fourth deployment. The goal of the exercise is to integrate and assess the staff and individual units within the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group, and to grant the strike group major operations certification upon completion. The Combat Direction Center (CDC) aboard Enterprise participated in a variety of training exercises as part of the carrier's COMPTUEX while underway in the Atlantic Ocean on 16 January 2012. The CDC is responsible for tracking and identifying all surface, air and sub-surface contacts and communicating the acquired information throughout the ship and the strike group. Computer systems and radars fill the spaces of CDC, and Sailors from many rates work together to gather, process, display and disseminate information. Sailors assigned to the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG-78) successfully completed a live-fire exercise of its entire array of gun weapon systems while underway conducting its COMPTUEX with the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group on 17 January 2012. Porter fired 47 blank load and powder rounds plus three illumination rounds from the MK-45 5-inch/54 caliber lightweight gun at a moving target that was approximately four nautical miles away, said Ensign Lauren M. Chatmas, the ship's ordnance officer. Sailors assigned to the visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) team aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG-78) conducted training while underway on 18 January 2012. Porter is underway in the Atlantic Ocean to better prepare for real-world threats it may encounter on deployment. Maritime Interception Operations require VBSS teams to intercept and determine the nature of vessels of interest. VBSS teams will board and search these vessels to determine if the vessel is hostile, said Ensign Bo Doran, the VBSS officer aboard Porter. Sailors aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG-94) participated in a VBSS training exercise on 18 January 2012. The scenario tested the ability of the VBSS team to conduct a boarding after pirates attacked a vessel. "They hit us hard," said Operations Specialist 2nd Class Jehovani Berrocales, the assistant boarding officer for the VBSS team. Enterprise administered the chief petty officer exam to 285 petty officers first class on 19 January 2012 while underway in the Atlantic Ocean. The annual exam must be completed in less than three hours and consists of 200 questions; 100 test the Sailors' rating knowledge and the remaining 100 questions cover general Navy topics. The Operations Department aboard Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG-69) took on some additional crew members while underway in the Atlantic Ocean on 19 January 2012. Sailors from other platforms including aircraft carriers and shore commands, are underway with Vicksburg during its COMPTUEX to learn how the many moving parts of a carrier strike group come together to accomplish a larger mission. "It is important to cross-train on various platforms," said Cryptologic Technician (Technical) 1st Class (SW) Andrew M. Jowder, USS Vicksburg Operations Department. As reported on 21 January 2012, U.S. Secretary of Defense Leon E. Panetta arrived aboard Enterprise today to visit the Navy's first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier while the ship was underway in the Atlantic Ocean. The visit marks Panetta's first time aboard an aircraft carrier as Secretary of Defense. During his time onboard, Panetta is scheduled to visit several of the 50-year-old carrier's work centers, dine with Sailors and address the crew during an All Hands Call scheduled to be held in the ship's hangar bay. Panetta is also scheduled to re-enlist and present awards to members of the Enterprise crew. Secretary of Defense (SECDEF) Leon E. Panetta visited Enterprise while underway in the Atlantic Ocean from 21 to 22 January 2012. Following his arrival on the carrier's flight deck via helicopter, Panetta was greeted by Rear Adm. Walter E. Carter, commander, Carrier Strike Group 12, and Capt. William C. Hamilton Jr., Enterprise commanding officer. Following a brief meeting, Panetta ate lunch with enlisted Sailors on the mess decks and held an All Hands Call for more than 1,700 Sailors and Marines. Sailors aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG-94) participated in a practice strait transit on 23 January 2012. In the scenario, the Nitze, along with Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers USS Porter (DDG-78) and USS James E. Williams (DDG-95), transited the fictional "Beryl Strait" off the coast of the equally fictional country "Amber." During the simulated transit, the small craft action team (SCAT) stationed at weapon mounts on board the ship closely monitored the actions of suspicious vessels. As Enterprise enters the second week of its COMPTUEX on 23 January 2012, Sailors assigned to the carrier's squadrons continue to work around the clock to ensure their aircraft and the personnel who make them fly are ready for “Big E's” upcoming deployment. Sailors of all rates, ranks and backgrounds aboard Enterprise came together in celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on 23 January 2012. The Enterprise's Multi-cultural Heritage Committee hosted the ceremony to recognize King for his dream and contributions to American society, and his leadership in the fight for equality. Key speakers recounted stories of witnessing the impact King had on their personal lives, as well as his effect on our nation and our Navy. Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS James E. Williams (DDG-95) is participating in an integrated anti-submarine course (IAC) to certify Destroyer Squadron 2 (DESRON 2) during an ongoing COMPTUEX with the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group on 26 January 2012. IAC is a series of exercises designed to effectively integrate all the surface and air assets involved in protecting aircraft carrier Enterprise in a strike group setting. The successful completion of the exercises will certify DESRON 2 for the squadron's upcoming deployment. As pilots assigned to the squadrons of Carrier Air Wing 1 continue to earn flight hours aboard Enterprise during the ship's COMPTUEX on 26 January 2012, a group of Sailors is tracking their every movement from their "perch" above the ship. The 'perch' is known as Primary Flight Control (Pri-Fly) - a small room towering seven stories above Enterprise's flight deck that provides its occupants a panoramic view of deck operations below. Located on the 0-11 level, Pri-Fly is the watch station for a crew of around 10 Sailors, all with a primary mission of ensuring Enterprise aircraft are safely launched and recovered. Enterprise conducted COMPTUEX in the Western Atlantic from 11 to 29 January 2012. Cheerleaders and football players from the NFL's Jacksonville Jaguars visited Enterprise while the ship was in port at Naval Station Mayport, Fla. on 31 January 2012. The players and cheerleaders took photos with Sailors and Marines, signed autographs and toured the flight deck during their visit to the 50-year-old ship. "This is something that a lot of us have never done before, so it was a great experience to get to tour the actual ship and see all the aircraft," said Chelsea Belloit, Jacksonville Jaguars cheerleader. "We definitely had a great time and we hope to come back and tour again." Enterprise made a port of call at Mayport, FL. on 1 February 2012, in port from 30 January 1 February 2012. Sailors assigned to the Arleigh-Burke class guided-missile Destroyer USS Porter (DDG-78) completed a replenishment at sea (RAS) with the Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS John Lenthall (T-AO-189) on 1 February 2012. (Today) we are taking 160,000 pounds of F-76 fuel and 17 pallets of Cargo from Lenthall," said Chief Boatswain's Mate Anthony P. Osborne. "It will take approximately two hours to complete this RAS evolution." Chief Warrant Officer (CWO) 5 James Yager made history as the last officer aboard the Enterprise to be promoted to the rank of CWO5 during a ceremony held on 1 February 2012 aboard the ship. CWOs are selected through an annual promotion board and Enterprise will decommission with no other CWO4s aboard eligible for the next selection process. The Night Furies of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 42, Det. 10 assisted the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group throughout a COMPTUEX by participating in numerous exercises on 2 February 2012. The detachment is contributing to exercise Bold Alligator 2012, the largest amphibious exercise in the past 10 years, as a multipurpose air wing embarked aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS James E. Williams (DDG-95). Sailors and Marines aboard Enterprise enjoyed a Super Bowl party hosted by the ship's Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department on 5 February 2012. Super Bowl XLVI, featuring the New England Patriots and the New York Giants, was shown on an inflatable big screen in the ship's hangar bayRepresentative Howard "Buck" McKeon, Chairman, House Armed Services Committee, Representative William "Mac" Thornberry and Adm. Kirkland Donald, director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion, arrived aboard Enterprise on 5 February 2012 while the ship was underway in the Atlantic Ocean. The visit provided the guests an opportunity to witness carrier operations at sea and to visit with Sailors aboard before the ship deploys on her final deployment. Sailors and Marines from Carrier Air Wing 1 (CVW-1) departed Enterprise after successfully completing a 30-day underway period in the Atlantic Ocean on 9 February 2012. CVW-1 and Enterprise spent the past month participating in a Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX), a Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) and exercise Bold Alligator 2012 (BA12) in preparation for the 50 year-old ship's upcoming final deployment” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120210-05 - Release Date: 2/10/2012 10:51:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Peter Melkus, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS120111-01 - Release Date: 1/11/2012 11:43:00 AM - By Chief Mass Communication Specialist Stephen M. White, USS Enterprise Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS120113-02 - Release Date: 1/13/2012 4:29:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Kristin L. Grover, USS Enterprise Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS120117-03 - Release Date: 1/17/2012 5:23:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jacob Galito, USS Enterprise Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS120117-04 - Release Date: 1/17/2012 5:30:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Daniel J. Meshel, Enterprise Strike Group Public Affairs, USS JAMES E. WILLIAMS, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS120117-17 - Release Date: 1/17/2012 2:55:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Gregory White, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS120119-11 - Release Date: 1/19/2012 12:48:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Gregory White, USS Enterprise Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS120119-14 - Release Date: 1/19/2012 1:00:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jesse L. Gonzalez, Enterprise Strike Group Public Affairs, USS PORTER, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS120119-06 - Release Date: 1/19/2012 10:10:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jesse L. Gonzalez, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS PORTER, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS120120-33 - Release Date: 1/20/2012 11:53:00 PM - Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeff Atherton, Enterprise Strike Group Public Affairs, USS NITZE, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS120120-07 - Release Date: 1/20/2012 12:36:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Eric Brann, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS120125-24 - Release Date: 1/25/2012 7:13:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nicholas Scott, Enterprise Strike Group Public Affairs, USS VICKSBURG, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS120121-04 - Release Date: 1/21/2012 1:55:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Kristin L. Grover, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS120122-03 - Release Date: 1/22/2012 12:57:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Scott Pittman, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS120126-01 - Release Date: 1/26/2012 10:30:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeff Atherton, Enterprise Strike Group Public Affairs, USS NITZE, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS120125-02 - Release Date: 1/25/2012 3:55:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class (SW) Peter Melkus, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS120125-01 - Release Date: 1/25/2012 3:46:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Gregory White, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS120128-06 - Release Date: 1/28/2012 7:40:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Daniel J. Meshel, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS JAMES E. WILLIAMS, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS120128-08 - Release Date: 1/28/2012 7:48:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class (SW) Peter Melkus, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs,  USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS120201-04 - Release Date: 2/1/2012 5:33:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Kristin L. Grover, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, MAYPORT, Fla. (NNS), Story Number: NNS120205-15 - Release Date: 2/5/2012 8:59:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jesse L. Gonzalez, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS PORTER, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS120205-10 - Release Date: 2/5/2012 8:43:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Gregory A. Pickett II, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS120205-03 - Release Date: 2/5/2012 7:48:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Daniel J. Meshel, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS JAMES E. WILLIAMS, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS120206-02 - Release Date: 2/6/2012 5:02:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Kristin L. Grover, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS120205-16 - Release Date: 2/5/2012 9:01:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Kristin L. Grover, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS) & Story Number: NNS120210-02 - Release Date: 2/10/2012 10:37:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Kristin L. Grover, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

 

Vicksburg Departs for Final Deployment

 

“Guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG-69) departed its homeport of Mayport, Fla. on 9 March 2012 to make its final deployment, this time as part of the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group. Family members, friends and well-wishers gathered on the pier in the early morning hours to bid farewell to loved ones and wish them good luck.

"This is the first time I've deployed," said Cryptologic Technician (Technical) 3rd Class Ronnie Mathis temporarily assigned to
Vicksburg from USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71). "It was difficult to leave my six-week old daughter and wife behind, but the crew is really nice and is helping me get through it," said Mathis.

Deploying can be challenging for a lot of Sailors, even seasoned veterans who still must make sure all affairs ashore are in order. "It doesn't really get any easier," said Navy Counselor 1st Class Brian S. Olinger, the career counselor aboard
Vicksburg. "I've been in the Navy for 19 years and this is my fifth and final sea deployment. No one wants to leave their loved ones behind, but we have a mission."

This deployment marks the end of
Vicksburg's 20 years of service since its commissioning in 1992. "The mission must come first, the mission is why we are here in the first place," said Ensign Michael E. Fitzpatrick, first lieutenant for Vicksburg. "The crew understands that and they are very professional."

Although this is the last deployment for
Vicksburg, mission readiness is still the key to success. "We must not view this deployment in terms of being the last deployment," said Capt. Logan Jones, commanding officer of Vicksburg. "We are not looking for any final glory."

Jones also said that "at the end of the day we know that we will have served with honor, but we must not react differently than we normally would in any given situation."
Vicksburg's commanding officer is just one of the ship's crew looking forward to completing a successful deployment as part of the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group team.

"I look forward to a deployment of working with maritime partners, flying missions and providing security," said Jones. "My job is to leave with 370 Sailors and return with 370 Sailors and that is what I intend to do."
Vicksburg is scheduled to decommission in 2013.

The Enterprise Carrier Strike Group is comprised of
Enterprise, Carrier Air Wing 1, Destroyer Squadron 2, USS Vicksburg (CG-69), and guided-missile destroyers USS Porter (DDG-78), USS Nitze (DDG-94), and USS James E. Williams (DDG-95)” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120312-05 - Release Date: 3/12/2012 4:59:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nick C. Scott, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS VICKSBURG, At Sea (NNS)).

Sailors man the rails as the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) departs Naval Station Norfolk for its final deployment.

 

120311-N-KH885-052 - NORFOLK (March 11, 2012) - Sailors man the rails as the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departs Naval Station Norfolk for its final deployment. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matthew Perreault/Released)

 

The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) departs Naval Station Norfolk for the ship's 22nd and final deployment.

 

120311-N-ZE938-078 - NORFOLK (March 11, 2012) - The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departs Naval Station Norfolk for the ship's final deployment. Enterprise is deploying as part of Enterprise Carrier Strike Group to support maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Frank J. Pikul/Released)

 

Sailors man the rails as the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) departs Naval Station Norfolk for its final deployment.

 

120311-N-KH885-052 - NORFOLK (March 11, 2012) - Sailors man the rails as the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departs Naval Station Norfolk for its final deployment. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matthew Perreault/Released)

 

Enterprise Departs on Final Deployment, the ship's 25th and final deployment                (30th FWFD).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with CVW-3, Rear Adm. Ted Carter, commander, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group and Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 2 embarked departed Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia on 11 March 2012, Captain William C. Hamilton, Jr., as Commanding Officer, on her 11th Mediterranean Sea deployment (19th & 20th voyage), operating with the 6th Fleet, en route to the Mediterranean Sea through the Atlantic operating with the Navy's Fleet Forces Command to the Mediterranean Sea, making her 18thSuez Canal transit, on her 18h Red Sea and Gulf of Aden voyage en route to her 13th Arabian Sea deployment as part of an ongoing rotation of U.S. forces in support of her 4th Maritime Security Operations (MSO) and theater security cooperation efforts designed to maintain regional stability in international waters around the globe and her 6th Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), the "military response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, commencing on 7 October 2001, on her 7thArabian/Persian Gulf deployment and 8th aerial Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment via the Gulf of Oman and Strait of Hormuz into the Persian Gulf, operating under operational control of the US Naval Forces Central Command and 5th Fleet, operating under operational control of the US Naval Forces Central Command and 5th Fleet, headquartered in Manama, Bahrain in July 1995, moving ashore in Bahrain in 1993, while their former head quarters, USS LA SALLE departed for overhaul and reassignment, and the 5th Fleet, reactivated with operational control of the Persian Gulf, Red Sea, and Arabian Sea, while U.S. Naval Forces Central Command operational control extends to the Indian Ocean following the war with Iraq (Operation Desert Storm), with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component commander for Central Command, with the beginning of Operation Southern Watch commencing 26 August 1992 (when President George H. W. Bush announced that the United States and its allies had informed Iraq that in 24 hours Allied aircraft would fly surveillance missions in southern Iraq and were prepared to shoot down any Iraqi aircraft flying south of the 32nd parallel, while President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated at 9 p.m. EST 27 February 1992, flight operations ending at midnight), with Operation Desert Storm commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991 until 27 February 1992, when President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated and Operation Desert Storm would end at midnight) and Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait). The Enterprise Carrier Strike Group consists of approximately 5,500 Sailors and Marines who, during the last few months, successfully completed a series of complex training events and certifications to ensure they were capable of operating effectively and safely together. "This Strike Group is trained and ready for the full spectrum of operations," said Rear Adm. Ted Carter, commander, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group. "We're ready to maintain freedom of the sea lanes, project power if directed to do so, and certainly perform a presence mission." These skills, which will be vital as the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group travels to the 5th Fleet area of responsibility (AOR) in support of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), were recently tested during the carrier's Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX). "During my time as Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command, I haven't sent a strike group underway that is as ready as you are," said Adm. John C. Harvey, Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command, while addressing the crew of Enterprise prior to the ship getting underway. "No one has done as much to get ready, worked as hard, and accomplished as much in every warfare area. You should be very proud of what you're going to be doing once you get to where you're going...where the business of the nation needs you." For Enterprise, the Navy's first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, the deployment represents the culmination of more than 50 years of distinguished service. Commissioned in 1961, the Enterprise is both the largest and oldest active combat vessel in the Navy. Enterprise's age, however, does not impact its effectiveness. "Enterprise is as ready and capable as she has ever been throughout her 50 years," said Capt. William C. Hamilton, Commanding Officer of Enterprise. "The ship and crew's performance during work-ups demonstrates that the world's first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier has never been more relevant." Throughout its storied history, Enterprise has played a role in the Cuban Missile Crisis, Vietnam, Operations Enduring and Iraqi Freedom, and was one of the first Navy assets deployed following the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. The importance of the role Enterprise has played in both national and naval history is a fact not lost on the Sailors and Marines currently aboard the ship. "The crew is very mindful that we are following the legacy of the more than 200,000 Sailors who have come before us during the last 50 years," said Hamilton. "It's the Sailors of this great warship, and the Sailors that have served aboard “Big E” over the past half-century that have established the legacy she enjoys." Enterprise was designed in the late 50's for a 25-year lifespan, and the Nimitz-class carriers were designed for 50 years. "To effectively double the service life of a ship as complex as Enterprise speaks volumes about the design strengths of the world's first nuclear-powered carrier, the Navy's commitment to cost effectiveness, and our Sailors hard work and innovation throughout the last half-century to keep her going strong," said Hamilton. Enterprise is scheduled for deactivation and eventual decommissioning following its anticipated return later this year, marking the end of the carrier's legendary 50-plus years of service. Enterprise will steam from the Persian Gulf through the Strait of Hormuz(8 transits while on deployment) into the Gulf of Oman and the North Arabian Sea to the Arabian Sea to the Gulf of Aden (19th voyage) and through the Bab el Mandeb by westerly and northerly courses and enter the Red Sea, on her 19th Red Sea voyage, making her 19th Suez Canal transit to the Mediterranean Sea operating with the 6th Fleet, on her 20th voyage in the Med, steaming through the Atlantic on her way home. She will under go 31st Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission November 25, 1961 with Captain V. P. de Poix in command” (Ref. 1-Enterprise, 72, 76, 362H, 1270 & Story Number: NNS120311-02 - Release Date: 3/11/2012 3:16:00 PM - From Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affaire, At Sea (NNS))

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with CVW-3 (AC)

(11 March to 4 November 2012)

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) – Navy's Fleet Forces Command, 6th, 5th & Central Command

(18th & 19th Gulf of Aden & Red Sea voy. & 7th Arabian / Persian Gulf dep. & 8th aerial Arabian / Persian Gulf  dep. & 13th North Arabian Sea dep.) - Lant

11th Med

18th Suez Canal

Red Sea
Bab el-Mandeb Strait

Gulf of Aden

Arabian Sea
North

6th OEF

4th MSO Arabian Sea
Gulf of Oman

Strait of Hormuz

Persian Gulf
Strait of Hormuz

Gulf of Oman

North Arabian Sea OEF/MSO Gulf of Oman

Strait of Hormuz
Persian Gulf
Strait of Hormuz

Gulf of Oman

North Arabian Sea
OEF/MSO Gulf of Oman

Strait of Hormuz

Persian Gulf
Strait of Hormuz

Gulf of Oman
North Arabian Sea
OEF/MSO Gulf of Oman
Strait of Hormuz

Persian Gulf
Strait of Hormuz

Gulf of Oman

North Arabian Sea
OEF/MSO Gulf of Aden

Strait of Bab Al Mandeb
Red Sea
19
th Suez Canal

Med
Strait of Messina
Med
Strait of Gibraltar
Lant

CVW-1

AB

11 Mar 2012

4 Nov 2012

Europe

Middle East

Afghanistan

War

31st FWFD

239-Days

A passing exercise (PASSEX) and an opportunity to work with the French, 4th Maritime Security Operations (MSO) and her 6th Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), the "military response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, commencing on 7 October 2001.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VFA-11

Red Rippers - Strike Fighter Squadron

 

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet

Jet Strike Fighter

AB100

FA-18F

VFA-211

Fighting Checkmates - Strike Fighter Squadron

 

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet

Jet Strike Fighter

AB200

FA-18F

VFA-136

Knighthawks -

Strike Fighter Squadron

 

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

AB300

FA-18C

VMFA-251

Thunderbolts - Marine Fighter Attack Squadron

 

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

AB400

FA-18C (N)

VAQ-137

Rooks -

Tactical Electronic

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Prowler       Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic -installation

AB500

EA-6B

VAW-123

Screwtops -

Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600

E-2C

HS-11

The Dragonslayers - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Seahawk Anti-submarine -         Search and Rescue

610

SH-60F / HH-60H

VRC-40 Det.

Rawhides - Fleet Logistics Support Squadron

Grumman - Greayhound - Transport

40, xx

C-2A

F/A-18 Hornet, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking, E-2C Hawkeye, SH-60 Seahawk and C-2A Greyhound

 

“Rear Adm. Ted Carter, commander, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group is comprised of Enterprise, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 2, guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG-69), and guided-missile destroyers USS Porter (DDG-78), USS Nitze (DDG-94), and USS James E. Williams (DDG-95).

CVW-1 is comprised of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 11, Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 211, Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 136, Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 251, Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 137, Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 123 and Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron (HS) 11” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120311-02 - Release Date: 3/11/2012 3:16:00 PM - From Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affaire, At Sea (NNS))

 

USS Porter Rejoins Enterprise Carrier Strike Group

 

“When guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG-78) and the rest of the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group departed Naval Station, Norfolk, Va. on 11 March 2012, the crew was prepared for their deployment. The crew had trained and prepared for many months to be able to provide maritime security, stability and an important naval presence in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility.

What the
Porter's crew faced in the early hours of Aug. 12, however, was a challenge nobody had expected. That morning, everything changed. "I will never forget the sound. It was incredible. After that, nothing was the same," said Gunner's Mate Seaman Aaron Wells-Wood, who witnessed what would prove to be a life-changing moment for many of the Sailors aboard Porter that day.

While completing a transit of the
Strait of Hormuz, one of the world's most important and strategic waterways, Porter collided with a 160,000 ton, Japanese owned merchant tanker. While no one on either ship was injured during the collision, it required the crew of Porter to set general quarters and, in the moments after impact, take action to maintain and preserve the ship's ability to sustain operability and combat damage.

In those key moments,
Porter's crew rose to the occasion, proving that the training they had undergone throughout their Navy careers had been worthwhile. "I'll say it simply - there was no way that a husband, wife, mother, father, brother, sister, son or daughter wasn't going to come back home to their loved ones," said Damage Controlman 1st Class Sean Connolly, one of the first Sailors on scene to combat the damage caused by the collision.

Awarded a Navy Achievement Medal for his actions that day, Connolly is quick to mention that he is but one of many Sailors who performed exactly as they had been trained. "As with most things in the damage control world, the unexpected can happen fast, often too fast to stop and think about what to do. That's where training comes in, and it paid off here," said Connolly.

The actions of Connolly and his fellow Sailors aboard
Porter ensured that Porter would be able to steam, under her own power, to a pier in the United Arab Emirates where the repair process would begin. Technical representatives and Arleigh-Burke class engineers and specialists arrived from across the Navy to assess the damage.

 

The repair process they would then undertake would become the most extensive voyage repair, a name given to repairs performed while deployed, ever completed. For more than a month, Porter Sailors, Naval Sea Systems Command and Navy Regional Maintenance Command engineers and civilian contractors worked day and night to get Porter back up and running as intended.

"Because of where the ship was damaged, a lot of cables had to be cut to remove the damaged steel. This meant that we had to figure out a way to return and restore vital equipment functions and power. It was no easy task," said Electrician's Mate 3rd Class Casey Schneider, part of Porter's combat systems electrical division, who was closely involved in the repairs.

After the repairs were complete, and
Porter was operational again, the decision was made for the ship to return home with her strike group. "The teamwork and resilience the crew of Porter showed in overcoming the initial shock of the collision and working to get the ship into shape to safely sail again was awe-inspiring," said Rear Adm. Ted Carter, commander, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group.

 

"As the Commander of the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group, I could not be more proud of what these young men and women accomplished in the hours following the collision as well as the weeks following during which Porter was rebuilt for duty. It is a testament to the quality of our force and what makes the U.S. Navy so formidable."

For many Sailors, the memory of the collision in the
Strait of Hormuz, and what it ultimately led to, still lingers. "I will never forget that night and how surreal it seemed at the time. But, I also know that the actions of everyone aboard saved lives. Not just one or two, but everyone's. We came together and that's important. I'll remember that more than anything else," said Wells-Wood.

The crew of
Porter came together on that early morning in August. Now, the men and women of Porter are coming together once again; only this time, they are coming together with the strike group they deployed with... and the mission is to return home” (Ref. Story Number: NNS121014-04 - Release Date: 10/14/2012 11:34:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Alex R. Forster, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS PORTER, At Sea (NNS)).

Enterprise Engineers Power Through

 

“While getting underway from Naval Station Norfolk, Va. on 11 March 2012, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) experienced extensive fouling to three of her four main engines and five of the ship's eight service turbine generators. Fouling occurs when any foreign debris gets built up in the impellers causing increased pressure on the main engines. It can be anything from small sea creatures to large pieces of trash sucked into the ship's systems creating a blockage.

In this case, Bryozoa, a type of tiny fish with hair-like fibers, built up in the impellers over a period of time causing the fouling. This build up usually happens about once a month, but due to
Enterprise being docked since July 2011, and with only short underway periods since, the build-up happened much faster and almost prevented her from moving at all.

Prompt action on the part of the
Engineering Department ensured that propulsion and electrical power were maintained throughout this potentially dangerous casualty. On March 10, a day before Enterprise was scheduled to begin its final deployment, watchstanders in No. 2 Main Machinery Room (2MMR) noted increasing seawater injection pressure on the No. 2 main engine (2M/E), a symptom of fouling.

"We recommended to central control that 2M/E be back-flushed," said Machinist's Mate 1st Class William P. Miller, leading petty officer of 2MMR. "The main propulsion assistant followed our recommendation and also ordered the other three main engines back-flushed as a precaution." The back-flushing ensured there was less strain on the propulsion plants before
Enterprise pulled out to sea.

 

The ship left 10 minutes earlier than expected March 11, but shortly after getting underway, indication of fouling was observed on three of the ship's service turbine generators (SSTG) and an auxiliary machinery circulation water pump. "We spent most of the night before and the day of deployment getting the systems flushed out," said Lt. Cmdr. John Kajmowicz, Enterprise's main propulsion assistant. "Due to outstanding performance, we were able to clean out the systems and keep us moving."

 

Kajmowicz said watchstanders are the main reason why the ship continues to move forward. When there is a problem it is the watchstander who notifies central control of the situation. Upon noticing the indications of fouling, machinery division began to systematically open and inspect each of the eight SSTG condensers to clear out any remaining fouling. Engineers removed more than two pounds of debris from the system.

On March 12
th, Capt. William C. Hamilton Jr., commanding officer of Enterprise, ordered an ahead flank bell, 171 rotations per minute, and no signs of fouling were observed on any of the main engines proving that engineering had once again kept “Big E” moving” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120317-10 - Release Date: 3/17/2012 11:51:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Heath Zeigler, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

USS Nitze departs Naval Station Norfolk.

 

120312-N-PI709-128 - NORFOLK, Va. (March, 12 2012) - The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG-94) departs Naval Station Norfolk as part of the Enterprise Carrier Strike group. Nitze will be deployed to the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Samantha Thorpe/Released)

 

USS Nitze Departs for Deployment

 

“The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG-94) departed Naval Station Norfolk, Va. on 12 March 2012 for a scheduled deployment. Nitze, operating with the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group, is scheduled to work with coalition maritime forces focusing heavily on Maritime Security Operations and theater security cooperation efforts designed to maintain regional stability.

This deployment comes in the wake of countless hours of training, maintenance and practice. "Our training was meant to closely simulate potential situations as realistically as possible," said Cmdr. John Bub,
Nitze's executive officer. "It was meant to force crew members to think through problems and face potential issues."

"Some of the problems the ship faced in training were counter-piracy related, as well as handling surface and air contacts," said Lt. Chris Byrnes, Nitze's operations officer. "It gave the crew a lot of operational experience to make sure they were ready for deployment." Commissioned in 2005,
Nitze has deployed twice to the 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility and is ready for the challenges they may face on this deployment.

"
Nitze established a great reputation during previous deployments," said Byrnes. "The commanding officer and the crew expect to meet and exceed expectations placed on them." "The crew performed above expectations in every aspect of our training," said Bub. "We are more than prepared to face any challenges that come our way during deployment."

For the crew, the deployment will be business as usual. "I expect the crew to perform in the manner in which they have been trained," said Bub. "The crew has been trained on aspect of the ship and are prepared to use what they know, including the combat systems, if necessary."

Since returning from a monthlong training exercise earlier this year,
Nitze has gotten several new crew members. "We expect the new crew members to successfully and fully integrate with the crew," said Byrnes.

Upon arriving in the 5
th and 6th fleet areas of responsibility, the crew will be ready to perform any task asked of them. "When we arrive, we will be ready to go anywhere and perform any duties asked of us at a moment's notice," said Byrnes.

The Enterprise Carrier Strike Group is comprised of
Enterprise, Carrier Air Wing 1, Destroyer Squadron 2, guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG-69), and guided-missile destroyers USS Porter (DDG-78), USS Nitze (DDG-94) and USS James E. Williams (DDG-95)” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120313-31 - Release Date: 3/13/2012 10:18:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeff Atherton, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS NITZE, At Sea (NNS)).

James E. Williams Departs Norfolk for Fourth Deployment

 

“Arleigh-Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS James E. Williams (DDG-95) departed Norfolk Naval Station on 12 March 2012 on the ship's fourth deployment with the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group.

James E. Williams is scheduled to deploy to the U.S. Navy's 5th and 6th Fleet areas of operation as part of an ongoing rotation of U.S. forces supporting maritime security operations in international waters around the globe.

"We are a multi-mission platform," said Christopher M. Senenko, the commanding officer of
James E. Williams, "and we are extremely flexible in our ability to respond to anything that the regional commanders need us to do."

The ship recently completed a series of training events and certifications with the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group during
Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) to ensure operational readiness and cohesiveness.

The operating effectiveness of the destroyer during
COMPTUEX will be fundamental as the ship travels to the 5th Fleet area of responsibility (AOR) to work with allied and partner maritime forces.

"In a training environment the crew is able to practice procedures and techniques that they may potentially encounter while deployed," said Senenko. "
COMPTUEX gave us exposure to multiple mission-sets and taskings needed to execute future operations in the 5th and 6th Fleet AOR."

Beyond mission success the deployment aboard
James E. Williams offers Sailors a chance to develop professionally, visit foreign ports, and gain qualifications.

"This is a great time for the crew," said Senenko. "They're able to focus on personal growth and achieving the next milestone in the life of this great warship."

James E. Williams is slated to begin an extended yard period following the destroyer's return from deployment.

The Enterprise Carrier Strike Group is comprised of
James E. Williams, USS Enterprise (CVN-65), Carrier Air Wing 1, Destroyer Squadron 2, guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG-69), and guided-missile destroyers USS Porter (DDG-78), and USS Nitze (DDG-94)” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120314-09 - Release Date: 3/14/2012 3:25:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Daniel J. Meshel, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS JAMES E. WILLIAMS, At sea (NNS)).

 

USS Enterprise Sailor Recovered After Falling Overboard

 

“A Sailor aboard USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was recovered uninjured after falling overboard at 5:39 a.m. on 15 March 2013.

The Sailor was recovered by an SH-60F
Seahawk search and rescue helicopter from Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron (HS) 11.

The Sailor was working on the flight deck when the incident occurred. Several other Sailors working nearby witnessed the fall and immediately called for assistance.

The HS-11 helicopter, attached to Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1, was not airborne at the time of the incident, but quickly made preparations for takeoff in response to the man overboard call.

Enterprise
and CVW-1 are conducting Carrier Qualifications in the Atlantic Ocean prior to continuing on the ship's regularly-scheduled deployment.

The cause of the incident is currently under investigation. The Sailor is currently in the ship's
Medical Department for evaluation and observation” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120315-04 - Release Date: 3/15/2012 9:11:00 AM - From Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

 

Enterprise Stands Ready to Respond

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted a mass casualty drill on 17 March 2012, as part of a continued commitment to mission readiness. A mass casualty is any instance in which the level of casualties is greater than the medical department can support. "The number of casualties that warrants a mass casualty response is typically five or more," said Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Stuart A. Breen, flight deck corpsman and initial responder. "When this happens, a mass casualty is called away to set up all the battle dressing stations to take on the influx of patients." There are four levels of casualties used to categorize the injured who will then be taken to one of four corresponding triage stations.

 

"A red station is for those needing immediate care, yellow for those marked delayed, black for expectant and green for what are called 'walking wounded,'" said Breen. Another aspect of a mass casualty event is the activation of the walking blood bank. "This is our way to handle a situation in which, we may need a large quantity of blood to save a patient's life very rapidly," said Breen. "Blood out of body has an expiration date so we store some on board but the rest we must get from the crew." "Anyone can potentially save someone's life by participating in the walking blood bank and those interested should come down to medical to sign up," said Breen.

 

A mass casualty event doesn't just affect the Medical Department, as the cause of such massive damage and injury would likely be a ship-wide catastrophe. "Today's drill was important because it integrated personnel from medical, damage control, weapons, navigation and the air wing to combat a massive fire with mass casualties on the flight deck," said Chief Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) Frank Markulin, assistant drill coordinator. "The flight deck crew and air wing had to respond to two separate scenes while navigation steered the ship to aid in firefighting efforts and rapid elevator transport of the injured to the hangar bay for medical treatment."

 

The main focus of a drill like this is mission readiness and the overall ability of the Enterprise to carry out its operational missions. "An aircraft carrier exists to launch and recover aircraft," said Markulin. "If there was an actual casualty on the flight deck, we need to get it under control as quickly as possible so the rest of the ship is not affected.


"If it gets out of control the entire ship is at risk and
Enterprise would not be able to complete her mission," said Markulin. Markulin said that while it is critical to have a well-structured leadership team, it is the E-6 and below Sailors who really deserve the praise in these evolutions.

 

"The Sailors did a great job today combating both fires and medical did an outstanding job with triage," said Markulin. "Remember, it is the blue shirts and junior Sailors who get these fires put out and return the ship to full operational readiness and they deserve that recognition." The sentiment was also expressed by Lt. j.g. Gilbert Lee Bishop II, the mass casualty drill coordinator, who is responsible for making sure everyone is trained to respond to any type of emergency that happens on the flight deck or in the hangar bay.

 

"Today's drill was mainly focused on combating multiple fires and the safe movement of 50 casualties from the flight deck to the hanger bay," said Bishop. "It's all about saving lives and keeping the Enterprise afloat and able to carry out her operational missions," said Bishop” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120319-18 - Release Date: 3/19/2012 10:07:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Randy J. Savarese, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

Porter Sailors Maintain Readiness

 

“As Sailors aboard USS Porter (DDG-78) continue across the Atlantic Ocean on 17 March 2012, they take advantage of the time during the transit to the 5th and 6th Fleet areas of operation to further hone their mission readiness.

With a crew of about 300,
Porter Sailors must be well-versed in all aspects of the ship's operations in order to maintain the highest level of readiness.

"We had a general quarters (GQ) drill today which had multiple simultaneous instances of simulated damage. It definitely got a little crazy, which was good, because it challenged us to think harder and work more effectively," said Damage Controlman Fireman Steven A. Alexander.

The ship's training officer, Lt. j.g. Andrew T. Bartholomeaux, is responsible for ensuring that
Porter meets and exceeds training standards that are commonly known as continuous certification requirements.

"We try to introduce the crew to stressful and realistic situations in order to build the muscle memory that is crucial when sailing into a potentially hostile zone, in order to keep
Porter safe when it matters most," said Bartholomeaux.

The set of drills
Porter plans to run on its transit across the Atlantic will put the crew and the ship through its paces.

Warfare specific drills compartmentalize the training evolutions to minimize the impact on the overall ship's schedule, but when multiple warfare areas are integrated into a single, comprehensive and interwoven training scenario, the heat is turned up.

"When we have a GQ drill, things become a little more hectic. It's not just a fire drill, it's a whole ship drill that really requires a lot of focus," said Alexander.

The integrated training environment allows the crew to act and react across different warfare areas, improving flexibility and capacity in a real situation.

"These kinds of scenarios build confidence, confidence that will save lives," said Bartholomeaux” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS120318-01 - Release Date: 3/18/2012 9:30:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alex R. Forster, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS PORTER, At Sea (NNS)).

Enterprise Honors 11 with Burial at Sea

 

“Sailors assigned to USS Enterprise (CVN-65) committed the remains of 11 veterans, including two former Enterprise Sailors, to their final resting place in the Atlantic Ocean during a burial at sea ceremony on 17 March 2012.

Those 'committed to the deep' included an
Enterprise plankowner who served aboard the carrier during its maiden deployment in 1962, and a master chief master-at-arms assigned to Enterprise at the time of his death several months ago. All 11 service members received full military honors at the ceremony.

"It's always a privilege to be asked to conduct a burial at sea, but this is the first one I've done involving someone I actually knew," said Cmdr. John Owen, command chaplain. "To commit a shipmate I've served with made this ceremony much sadder and more meaningful."

Nearly all of the master-at-arms aboard
Enterprise attended the ceremony to pay final respects to their shipmate and master chief.

They were joined by a majority of the carrier's Chief Petty Officers Mess, on hand to honor a member of the Mess as his remains were committed to the deep.

"It was an honor to pay tribute to a good shipmate and friend today," said Chief Master-at-Arms Larry Harper, a ceremony participant. "We feel like we've lost a member of our family and he has been greatly missed."

Though they were not originally scheduled to participate in the ceremony, Harper said members of
Enterprise's security team insisted on playing any roles they could.

"I'm very impressed and moved by the way people step up and volunteer to go out of their way to honor fellow service members aboard this ship, and today's ceremony was another perfect example of that," said Owen. "I think everyone feels good about how we appropriately honored these people, and I'm always proud to be part of such a timeless naval tradition.

 

It's through ceremonies like these that we live out what it means to be true shipmates"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120317-11 - Release Date: 3/17/2012 11:56:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Peter Melkus, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

Enterprise Sailors Conduct Missile Upload

 

“Sailors aboard USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted an ammunition upload for multiple weapons systems used in shipboard defense from 15 to 17 March 2012.

Enterprise is equipped with two phalanx close-in weapons systems (CIWS), two NATO Sea Sparrow Missile Systems, and two rolling airframe missile (RAM) mounts.

"Our primary responsibility, as
Combat Systems, Weapons Division, is ship's self-defense; meaning if the tactical action officer needs us to destroy a threat to the ship, we are able to register a threat and neutralize it," said Ensign John Tatro, fire control officer for Enterprise. "With us, ensuring everything is operating properly and safely is a key concern."

In order to arm the weapons systems of
Enterprise, Sailors with Combat Systems Department must follow proper procedures to ensure the ammunition used to defend the ship does not harm the crew in the process.

"There are a lot of safety precautions we take in order to ensure the safety of the ordnance handlers and the crew," said Chief Fire Controlman John Tuley. "Our ordnance handlers have to become qualified, we hold a safety briefing before the actual ammunition loading, and we have safety observers on-scene while loading, among other personal safety precautions."

During the upload, the ship sets hazardous electromagnetic radiation to ordnance (HERO) conditions, to reduce risk of damage to uploaded explosives.

"It's nerve-wracking working around live ordnance, and you don't want to become complacent," said Fire Controlman 3rd Class Wayne Pattillo. "Listening to the assigned team leader is paramount, they are the only voice on the missile platform."

The ammunition upload took approximately three days, the efforts of an entire division of Sailors, and resulted in the loading of 2,800 rounds into the CWIS mounts, eight RIM-7M missiles loaded into the Sea Sparrow Missile System, and 21 missiles loaded into each RAM mount.

"The ordnance handling and loading teams did outstanding," said Tatro. "All the team leaders were on point, they followed procedures exactly, and they far exceeded my expectations."

Enterprise
is conducting its final deployment in support of maritime security operations and theater security operations in the U.S. Navy's 5th and 6th fleet areas of responsibility” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120320-20 - Release Date: 3/20/2012 9:21:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Scott Pittman, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

The guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) performs tactical maneuvers in the Atlantic Ocean.

 

120319-N-WO496-036 - ATLANTIC OCEAN (March 19, 2012) - The guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG-69) performs tactical maneuvers in the Atlantic Ocean. Vicksburg is deployed as part of Enterprise Carrier Strike Group to support maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alex R. Forster/Released) 

 

The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) is underway as part of Enterprise Carrier Strike Group.

 

120319-N-FI736-133 - ATLANTIC OCEAN (March 19, 2012) - The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65) is underway as part of Enterprise Carrier Strike Group to support maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Scott Pittman/Released)

 

Enterprise Completes SHOTEX

 

Medical Department Sailors aboard USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted a ship-wide vaccination, or SHOTEX, while on deployment from 19 to 20 March 2012.

The SHOTEX evolution allows a large percentage of the crew to quickly and efficiently receive the immunizations required for them to operate in the U.S. 5
th Fleet area of responsibility. The shots are part of an effort to keep Sailors healthy and mission ready at all times. During this SHOTEX, corpsmen administered vaccines for both small pox and anthrax.

"Anthrax and small pox are mandatory vaccinations for uniformed personnel deploying to the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility for more than 15 consecutive days," said Lt. Monica E. Hernandez, a medical administrative officer aboard
Enterprise.

In preparing for the evolution, supplies of vaccine syringes, biohazard containers and other medical supplies were ordered to help facilitate the large number of Sailors who would receive the vaccinations.

"We staged approximately 20 hospital corpsmen throughout the department in an effort to make the evolution as smooth as possible," said Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Jeffery D. Bozeman. "We administered roughly 3,000 vaccines in 48 hours."

The
“Big E” keeps thousands of medical supplies on board to facilitate an evolution like this, as well as to prepare for every day occurrences. "We make sure that we have the supplies we need and if not we make an effort to have what we need brought in by helocoptor or during an underway replenishment," said Chief Hospital Corpsman Luis A Valdez, a Medical Department chief petty officer.

The Medical Department's planning prior to the vaccinations ensured there were more than enough supplies on-hand and that the SHOTEX was successful. "My guys did a great job in making sure that this was a smooth evolution."

The
Medical Department administered the vaccines in order to help prepare the crew for the possibility of a bio-chemical attack aimed at the ship. "If an enemy were to attack using biological warfare, the vaccines can add to the first line of defense against infection," said Hernandez. "We do our part to make sure that the crew is ready to perform the mission at a moments notice."

Training evolutions like SHOTEX are important elements of the readiness area of the 21
st Century Sailor and Marine initiative which consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most combat-effective force in the history of the Department” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120324-04 - Release Date: 3/24/2012 10:41:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Heath Zeigler, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

 

The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG 78) transits the Atlantic Ocean.

 

120321-N-VH054-043 - ATLANTIC OCEAN (March 21, 2012) - The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG-78) transits the Atlantic Ocean. Porter is deployed with Enterprise Carrier Strike Group to support maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Harry Andrew D. Gordon/Released)

 

The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65), the guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69), and the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG 78)

 

120321-N-NL401-017 - ATLANTIC OCEAN (March 21, 2012) - The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65), the guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG-69), and the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG-78) participate in an replenishment at sea with the Military Sealift Command fast combat support ship USNS Supply (T-AOE-6). Enterprise, Vicksburg, Porter, and Supply are deployed as part of the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Daniel J. Meshel/Released)

 

Enterprise CSG Completes Passing Exercise

 

“Enterprise Carrier Strike Group (CSG) completed a series of training evolutions with Standing NATO Maritime Group (SNMG) 1 during a passing exercise (PASSEX) in the Mediterranean Sea from 24 to 25 March 2012. During the two-day exercise, nine ships from multiple navies were provided the opportunity to work together to promote communications, interoperability and partnership for the shared goal of maintaining the safety and security of the region's sea lanes.

 

"PASSEX allows the Enterprise CSG to train with our coalition partners, build on relationships and maintain our interoperability," said Cmdr. Richard D. Brawley, surface operations officer for Carrier Strike Group 12. One of the evolutions conducted was a link exercise (LINKEX), which employed the Link-11 and Link-16 tactical data link systems to trade communications, intelligence and other data directly among all the ships in the exercise. The ships used these systems during an air-defense exercise to increase self defense and create a better situational awareness.

 

"During the exercise we're tracking the other NATO ships, merchant vessels in the area and several contacts playing the role of hostiles all at the same time," said Operations Specialist Seaman Recruit Sarah Fowler, an assistant surface watchstander. "The training was definitely intense because you have to be on point all the time." U.S. and NATO Sailors from each ship also had the opportunity to cross-deck to the other ships. Sailors toured spaces and met with their counterparts to get a feel for how Sailors on the other ships live and work. "The visits allow the Sailors to build a mutual understanding of one another," said Brawley.

 

"This way the Sailors get a face with the name. When we do an exercise with NATO, we now have a personal relationship to build upon and spread esprit de corps with the rest of the crew around the ship." According to Brawley, the exchange was also beneficial to visiting staff, who were able to see first-hand the related procedures and protocol used by the different navies. This better prepares Enterprise officers to be able to provide products NATO units may request. "The exercise was very beneficial to our watchstanders because it prepares you to work with other nations," said Operations Specialist 2nd Class Milandy Rodriguez, assistant surface watch officer.

 

"This will help us as we begin our deployment and enter the 5th Fleet area of responsibility." This PASSEX involved aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65), the Arleigh Burke-class destroyers USS Nitze, USS Porter, USS James E. Williams and the guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg, all part of the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group.  SNMG 1 is comprised of the Royal Netherlands Navy frigate HNLMS De Ruyter (F-804), the Spanish Navy frigate Alvaro de Bazan (F 101), the German Navy frigate FGS Rheinland-Pfalz (F-209), and the Royal Canadian Navy frigate HMCS Charlottetown (FFH-339).

 

Enterprise and the rest of the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group are deployed to support maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. Training evolutions like PASSEX are important elements of the readiness area of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative which consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most combat-effective force in the history of the Department” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120326-02 - Release Date: 3/26/2012 5:46:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class (SW) Steve Smith, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS)).

 

USS Nitze Arrives in France

 

“The Arleigh Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG-94) arrived in Villefranche, France on 25 March 2012 for a regularly-scheduled port visit.

The visit serves to continue U.S. 6
th Fleet efforts to build global maritime partnerships with European nations and improve maritime safety and security in the region.

"We believe that regularly-scheduled port visits to our allies in the Mediterranean region increase our ability to work together for mutual prosperity and enhanced maritime security," said Cmdr. Christopher Nerad,
Nitze's commanding officer.

"We are going to Villefranche to strengthen relationships between France and the U.S.," said Master Chief Bill Arbuckle,
Nitze's command master chief. "It will also give our Sailors a chance to see new places and to see some French culture."

While in port, the officers and crew will meet with local officials, host a tour of the ship for the U.S. Navy league, play sports with local teams and help maintain a local World War II U.S. cemetery.

"We will be cleaning and maintaining the cemetery," said Nerad. "We will be paying our respects and assuring that, for many years to come, it will be a place that people can come to remember the sacrifices of those who went before us."

This port visit also serves as an opportunity for the crew to soak in the French culture.

"The crew will be able to gain an appreciation for the historical and cultural significance of the area," said Nerad. "They will be able to relax and enjoy all that Villefranche has to offer."

Nitze is conducting this port visit as part of a scheduled deployment to the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120326-12 - Release Date: 3/26/2012 5:15:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeff Atherton, Enterprise Strike Group Public Affairs, VILLEFRANCHE, France (NNS)).

USS Porter Arrives in Spain

 

“The Arleigh Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG-78) arrived in Palma, Spain on 26 March 2012 for a regularly scheduled port visit.

The visit serves to continue U.S. 6
th Fleet efforts to build global maritime partnerships with European nations and improve maritime safety and security in the region.

"Palma is a great scheduled port visit for us. It's a good place to experience Spanish culture, and a way for our countries and militaries to gain a better understanding about each other," said Cmdr. Martin F. Arriola,
Porter's commanding officer.

Upon pulling into Palma, the commanding officer, executive officer, and the command master chief paid an official visit to Capt. Jose Maria Lavilla Llano, commander-in-chief, naval sector Balearic Islands.

The ship also plans to host a dinner reception on the flight deck for local female leaders in the local police force, government, military, and justice department.

Static displays will be staged to highlight some of the equipment used in the conduct of maritime security operations, force protection, and damage control.

"Port visits like this strengthen relations with the host country and the U.S.," said Master Chief Michael Kelly,
Porter's command master chief.

While in port, the officers and crew will meet with local officials, host a tour of the ship for Spanish officials, play sports with local teams and help reforest a region of the island recently devastated by fires.

"It's a great chance for our Sailors to get out see the local culture and provide assistance at the same time," said Cmdr. Jennifer Couture, the ship's executive officer. "Our goal is to make a positive impact in the local community, and this is an excellent way to do so."

The port visit also offers a wide variety of historical buildings and sites for the crew to visit.

"Everyone on board has heard a lot about the culture and sights of Palma de Mallorca, and being here will give them a chance to relax and recharge," said Kelly.

Porter
is conducting this port visit as part of a scheduled deployment to the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility” (Ref. Story Number: NNS120326-13 - Release Date: 3/26/2012 5:16:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alex R. Forster, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, PALMA, Spain (NNS)).

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was underway in the Mediterranean Sea from 24 to 27 March 2012” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Final Foreign Water Fleet Deployment

 

Part I of VI (10 February to 26 March 2012)

Part II of VI (27 March to 12 May 2012)

Part III of VI (12 May to 18 July 2012)

Part IV of VI (19 July to 21 September 2012)

Part V of VI (22 September to 3 November 2012)

Part VI of VI (4 November 2012)

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Final Foreign Water Fleet Deployment

Part I of VI (10 February to 26 March 2012)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIER SHIP

HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619