U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS THAT PARTICPATED IN THE Mutual Defense Assistance Program (Lend Lease Program) (1951 to 1972), U. S. NAVY TRAINING CARRIERS IN THE NAVAL AIR RESSERVE (NAR), REDESIGNATED AIRCRAFT CARRIER TRAINING CARRIER, AIRCRAFT CARRIERS IN COMMISSION IN RESERVE (1947 to 1991) AND U.S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS THAT PARTICPATED IN THE SPACE PROGRAM AND PRIMARY RECOVER SHIP (1962 to 1975)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIER SHIP

HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS THAT PARTICPATED IN THE Mutual Defense Assistance Program (Lend Lease Program) (1951 to 1972), U. S. NAVY TRAINING CARRIERS IN THE NAVAL AIR RESSERVE (NAR), REDESIGNATED AIRCRAFT CARRIER TRAINING CARRIER, AIRCRAFT CARRIERS IN COMMISSION IN RESERVE (1947 to 1991) AND U.S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS THAT PARTICPATED IN THE

SPACE PROGRAM AND PRIMARY RECOVER SHIP (1962 to 1975)

 

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS THAT PARTICPATED IN THE Mutual Defense Assistance Program

(Lend Lease Program) (1951 to 1972)

 

SHIP

Inactive

DATE

DECOMM

DATE

Trans.

DATE

Second Langley (CVL-27) former CV

Renamed 13/11/42

Atlantic Reserve Fleet, Philadelphia Group

31/05/46

Atlantic Reserve Fleet, Philadelphia Group (1st)

11/02/47

France

01/08/51 to 20/03/63(S)

 

Belleau Wood (CVL-24) former CV & New Haven (CL-76)

Redes. CV-24 16/02/42

Renamed 16/02/42

CVL-24

15/07/43

Pacific Fleet Reserve Alameda Naval Air Station (1st)

13/01/47

France

05/11/53 to 01/10/60(S)

second Cabot (AVT-3), former CVL-28, CV-28 &Wilmington (CL-79)

Redes. CV-28 02/06/42

Renamed 23/06/42

Dedalo

AVT-3

15/05/59

Atlantic Reserve Fleet, Philadelphia Group Philadelphia

21/01/55

Spain

1967 to 1972 (SOLD to Spain)

Dedalo was stricken by the Spanish Navy in August 1989 and given to a private organization in the U.S. for use as a museum ship. However, that private organization was unable to pay its creditors, so, on 10 September 1999, the ship was auctioned off by the U.S. Marshal's Service to Sabe Marine Salvage.

The Belleau Wood (CVL-24) former CV & New Haven (CL-76), the 24th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy was Stricken from the Naval Vessel Register (Navy List) 1 October 1960, upon return to the United States from France, operating under the name Bois Belleau, while the ship served with the French navy under the Mutual Defense Assistance Program from 1953 to 1960; transferred to France 5 September 1953 under the Mutual Defense Assistance Program, remained in reserve until transferred to France 5 September 1953 under the Mutual Defense Assistance Program; moored at various docks in the San Francisco , Ca. area undergoing inactivation during 1947, placed out of commission in reserve at Alameda Naval Air Station 13 January 1947; reclassified CVL-24 on 15 July 1943 (United States Navy light aircraft carrier); commissioned 31 March 1943, Captain A. M. Pride in command; launched 6 December 1942 by New York Shipbuilding Corp., Camden, N. J.; sponsored by Mrs. Thomas Holcomb, wife of the Commandant of the Marine Corps; redesignated CV-24 & renamed Belleau Wood from New Haven (CL-76) 16 February 1942; keel was laid down as New Haven (CL-76) at New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey 11 August 1941.

The second Langley (CVL-27), former (CV-27), Fargo (CL-85) & Crown Point (CV-27), the 27th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy was sold to the Boston Metals Co., Baltimore, Md. for scrap in March 1964; returned to the United States 20 March 1963 after more than a decade of French Navy service, under the name La Fayette; decommissioned and her proud name was Stricken from the Naval Vessel Register (Navy List) sometime after 20 March 1963; taken out of "mothballs" early in 1951, refurbished and transferred to France under the Mutual Defense Assistance Program 8 January 1951; inactive at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, during the remainder of 1946, decommissioned there 11 February 1947. Received nine battle stars for World War II service in the Pacific. Inactivated to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet, Philadelphia Group during the remainder of 1946, 31 May 1946; commissioned on 31 August 1943 with Capt. W. M. Dillon in command; reclassified CVL-27, 15 July 1943 (United States Navy light aircraft carrier); launched at New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey 22 May 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Harry L. Hopkins, wife of the Special Assistant to President Roosevelt; originally named Fargo (CL-85), was renamed Langley 13 November 1942; her keel was laid down as Crown Point (CV-27) by New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey 11 April 1942; originally ordered as the light cruiser; but by the time her keel was laid in April 1942, she had been redesigned as an aircraft carrier, using the original cruiser hull and machinery; an 11,000-ton Independence class aircraft carrier

Dedalo, former Cabot AVT-3, CVL-28 (Light aircraft carrier), CV & Wilmington (CL-79), the 28th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy - In 1967, after over twelve years in "mothballs", Cabot was loaned to Spain under the Mutual Defense Assistance Program, in whose navy she served as Dedalo. The loan was converted to a sale in 1972. Dedalo was stricken by the Spanish Navy in August 1989 and donated by Spain after 22 years of service to a private organization in the U.S. as a museum ship. However, that private organization was unable to pay its creditors, so, on 10 September 1999, the ship was auctioned off by the U.S. Marshal's Service to Sabe Marine Salvage. Scrapping of the hulk was completed in 2002. Cabot was redesignated AVT-3 - auxiliary aircraft transport on 15 May 1959;  placed out of commission in reserve a second time on 21 January 1955; assigned to the Naval Air Reserve training program from 1948 to 1955, recommissioning during 1948; placed out of commission in reserve at assigned to Atlantic Reserve Fleet, Philadelphia Group Philadelphia 11 February 1947; earned the Presidential Unit Citation, received nine battle stars during World War II; commissioned 24 July 1943, Captain M. F. Shoeffel in command; reclassified CVL-28 on 15 July 1943; launched 4 April 1943 by New York Shipbuilding Co., Camden, N.J.; sponsored by Mrs. A. C. Read; renamed Cabot from Wilmington (CL-79) 23 June 1942, converted while building; redesignated CV-28 on 2 June 1942; keel was laid down as Wilmington (CL-79) at New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey 16 March 1942.

 

 

U. S. NAVY TRAINING CARRIERS IN THE NAVAL AIR RESSERVE (NAR), REDESIGNATED

AIRCRAFT CARRIER TRAINING CARRIER AND AIRCRAFT CARRIERS IN COMMISSION IN RESERVE (1947 to 1991)

 

 

NO. OF SHIPS

WITH

SAME

NAME

U. S. NAVY AIRCRAFT CARRIER NAME & HULL NO’S

LAID DOWN

LAUNCH

COMM

Sank, Inactivated, Decomm., Out/In Commission in Reserve, Decomm., Stricken, SOLD, Reactivated, Redes. or Recomm.

Second

Wright (AVT-7), former CVL-49

21/08/44

01/09/45

09/02/47

31/03/47 to 26/01/49 Naval Air Reserve

15/03/56(D)

Bremerton Group

Redes. AVT-7 15/05/59

Redes. CC-2 15/03/62

Recomm. 11/05/63

27/05/70(D) 2nd

Philadelphia Group Philadelphia Naval Shipyard

01/12/77(S)

01/08/80(SOLD)

second

Cabot (AVT-3), former CVL-28, CV-28 &Wilmington (CL-79)

Renamed 23/06/42

Dedalo

16/03/42

Redes. CV-28 02/06/42

 

04/04/43

24/07/43

Redes. CVL-28 15/07/43

 

11/02/47(D)

11/02/47 to 27/10/48(R)

Philadelphia Group

Recomm. 27/10/48

27/10/48 to 21/01/55 (NAR)

21/01/55(D/R) 2nd

Philadelphia Group

Redes. AVT-3 15/05/59

Lend Lease to Spain 1967 to 1972.

Sold to Spain in 1972

Lend Lease to Spain 1967 to 1972. In 1967, after over twelve years in "mothballs", Cabot was loaned to Spain, in whose navy she served as Dedalo. The loan was converted to a sale in 1972. Dedalo was stricken by the Spanish Navy in August 1989 and given to a private organization in the U.S. for use as a museum ship. However, that private organization was unable to pay its creditors, so, on 10 September 1999, the ship was auctioned off by the U.S. Marshal's Service to Sabe Marine Salvage.

 

Monterey (AVT 2), former CVL-26, CV-26 & Dayton (CL-78)

29/12/41

Redes. CV-26 27/03/42

Renamed 31/03/42

28/02/43

17/06/43

Reclas. CVL-26 15/07/43

11/02/47(D)

Philadelphia Group

Recomm. 15/09/50

15/09/50 to 16/01/56 (NAR)

16/01/56(D)

Philadelphia Group

Redes. AVT 2 15/05/59

01/06/70(S)

05/71 (SOLD)

Sold for scrapping.

 

Antietam (CVS-36), former CVA-36 & CV-36 (35th CC)

15/03/43

20/08/44

28/01/45

Early 1949(D)

Early in 1949 – 06/12/50(R) Alameda, Ca.

06/12/50(RA)

Recomm. 17/01/51

April 1952(I)

Pacific Reserve Fleet

Summer 52(RA) - June 1952

Sep. to Dec. 1952

New York Naval Shipyard

Redes. CVS 01/08/53

21/04/57 to 23/10/62 (NAR)

07/01/63 to 01/05/73(#)

Philadelphia Group

01/05/73(S)

01/12/73 (SOLD)

Fifth

Lexington (AVT-16), former CVT-16, CVS-16, CVA-16, CV-16 & Cabot

Renamed 16/06/42

 

15/07/41

23/09/42

17/02/43

23/04/47(D)

Apr. 1947 to Aug. 1955(R)

Bremerton Group

Recomm. 15/08/55

Redes. CVS-16 01/10/62

29/12/63 to 08/11/91 (NAR)

Redes. CVT-16 01/01/69

Redes. AVT-16 01/07/78

08/11/91(D) 2nd

Pensacola, Florida

30/11/91(S)

Donated  as a museum 15/06/92

From 21 April 1957 to 31 23 October 1962, USS Antietam (CVS-36) operated out of Mayport with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, participating in annual Naval Academy midshipmen cruises, operating out of Mayport, training new Navy pilots and conducting tests on new aviation equipment-most noteworthy on the Bell automatic landing system during August of 1958; assigned to training duty with the Naval Air Training Station, Pensacola, Florida, on 21 April 1957, she operated out of  Mayport until January 1959, after the deepening of the channel into Pensacola had been completed, conducting routine naval aviation training and disaster relief missions, providing humanitarian services in September of 1961 when she rushed to the Texas coast to provide supplies and medical assistance to the victims of hurricane Carla, while serving as the U. S. Navy Training Carrier with the Naval Air Training Station, Pensacola, Florida, assigned on 21 April 1957, with her home port as Mayport because the ships draft could not then enter port at Pensacola, replacing Monterey CVL-26, former (CV-26) & Dayton (CL-78), the 26th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy, departing Pensacola 9 June 1955 when she steamed to rejoin the reserve fleet

Donated USS Lexington Museum on the Bay on 15 June 1992 and now operates as such in Corpus Christi, Texas.

The first Saipan (CVL-48) was laid down on 10 July 1944 by the New York Shipbuilding Corp., Camden, N.J.; launched on 8 July 1945, sponsored by Mrs. John W. McCormack; and commissioned on 14 July 1946, Capt. John G. Crommelin in command. Commissioned eleven months after the close of World War II, Saipan trained student pilots out of Pensacola from September 1946 to April 1947 when, reassigned to Norfolk as homeport, she departed the Gulf of Mexico; participated in exercises in the Caribbean; then proceeded to Philadelphia for overhaul. In November, she returned to Pensacola; but, in late December, after training midshipmen, steamed back to the east coast to serve with the Operational Development Force. In February 1948, however, her work in jet operational techniques, carrier support tactics, and electronic instrument evaluation was interrupted briefly. From 7 to 24 February, she was engaged in transporting the United States delegation to the Venezuelan Presidential inauguration and back. On her return, she conducted local operations off the Virginia Capes, and in April, after a visit to Portsmouth, N.H., she resumed work for the Operational Development Force. On the 18th, she also relieved USS Mindoro (CVE-120) as flagship of Carrier Division 17 (CarDiv 17). On 19 April 1948, she departed Norfolk for Quonset Point, R.I., where, on 3 May, she embarked Fighter Squadron 17A. Three days later, all squadron pilots had qualified in FH-1 Phantom jets. The squadron became the first carrier-based jet squadron. Back at Norfolk by the end of the month, Saipan was relieved of flagship duties. In June, she returned to New England waters; and, in July, she commenced overhaul at Norfolk. In December, she resumed local operations. On the 24th, she was ordered to embark two of the Navy's latest type helicopter, the XHJS-1, and three Marine Corps HRP-1 helicopters and preceded north to Greenland to assist in the rescue of eleven airmen downed on the ice cap. Departing Norfolk on Christmas day, the CVL arrived off Cape Farewell on 28 December 1948 and prepared to launch the helicopters as soon as weather allowed. On the 29th however a C-47, equipped with jet assist takeoff and skis, landed on the ice, took on the marooned airmen and made it out again. Saipan then returned to Norfolk, arrived on the 31st, and sailed again on 28 January 1949. Steaming south, she conducted exercises out of Guantanamo Bay into March and returned to Hampton Roads on the 10th. From the 11th to the 19th, she conducted operations for the development force; then made a reserve training cruise to Canada. At the end of May, she again commenced work for the Operational Development Force. Three months later, she conducted her second reservist cruise of the year, then qualified Royal Canadian Navy pilots in carrier landings. From November 1949 to March 1951, Saipan remained on the east coast, operating from the Virginia Capes south. On 6 March 1951, she got underway as flagship, CarDiv 14, and sailed for duty with the 6th Fleet. Deployed for three months, she plied the waters of the western Mediterranean until the end of May, then headed for home. On 8 June, she was back at Norfolk, whence she resumed operations in the western Atlantic from Greenland to the Caribbean. In June 1955, she was again attached to the aviation training center at Pensacola; and, through the summer, conducted qualification exercises. At the end of September, she was ordered to Mexico to again assist in hurricane relief work. From 1 to 9 October, her helicopters evacuated 5,439 persons marooned on rooftops, trees and other retreats; flew in rescue personnel, and distributed 183,017 pounds of food, water and medical supplies, primarily in the flooded Tampico area. On 12 October, she returned to Pensacola, where she remained until April 1957. On the first of that month, she sailed for Bayonne, N.J., where she began inactivation and was decommissioned on 30 September 1957.

From 21 April 1957 to 31 23 October 1962, USS Antietam (CVS-36) operated out of Mayport with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, participating in annual Naval Academy midshipmen cruises, operating out of Mayport, training new Navy pilots and conducting tests on new aviation equipment-most noteworthy on the Bell automatic landing system during August of 1958; assigned to training duty with the Naval Air Training Station, Pensacola, Florida, on 21 April 1957, she operated out of  Mayport until January 1959, after the deepening of the channel into Pensacola had been completed, conducting routine naval aviation training and disaster relief missions, providing humanitarian services in September of 1961 when she rushed to the Texas coast to provide supplies and medical assistance to the victims of hurricane Carla, while serving as the U. S. Navy Training Carrier with the Naval Air Training Station, Pensacola, Florida, assigned on 21 April 1957, with her home port as Mayport because the ships draft could not then enter port at Pensacola, replacing Monterey CVL-26, former (CV-26) & Dayton (CL-78), the 26th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy, departing Pensacola 9 June 1955 when she steamed to rejoin the reserve fleet.

By the end of 1991, Forrestal made advanced preparations for a change of homeport to Pensacola, Florida, and the transition into a new role as the Navy's training carrier, replacing USS Lexington (AVT-16). Redesignated AVT-59 on 4 February 1992. Completed a 14-month, $157 million complex overhaul in September 1993, while the Navy decided to decommission Forrestal and leave the Navy without a dedicated training carrier.

The fifth Lexington (AVT-16), former CVT-16, CVS-16, CVA-16, CV-16 & Cabot was donated as USS Lexington Museum on the Bay  on 15 June 1992 and now operates as such in Corpus Christi, Texas.

 

IN COMMISSION IN RESERVE

 

NO. OF SHIPS

WITH

SAME

NAME

U. S. NAVY AIRCRAFT CARRIER NAME & HULL NO’S

LAID DOWN

LAUNCH

COMM

Sank, Inactivated, Decomm., Out/In Commission in Reserve, Decomm., Stricken, SOLD, Reactivated, Redes. or Recomm.

Fourth

Intrepid (CVS-11), former CVA-11 & CV-11

12/41

26/04/43

16/08/43

15/08/46(#)

09/0147(D)

09/0147 to 09/06/52(R)

Pacific Reserve Fleet

Recomm. 09/02/52

09/04/52(D) 2nd

Norfolk Naval Shipyard

Recomm. 2nd15/10/54

Redes. CVS 08/12/61

15/03/74(D) 3rd

Philadelphia Group

Formally Dedicated as a Memorial. Donated in New York City in 08/82

Destined to be scrapped shortly thereafter, a campaign led by the Intrepid Museum Foundation saved the carrier and established it as a floating museum which opened in New York City in August 1982. In 1986, Intrepid was officially designated as a National Historic Landmark. Shortly after 15 March 1974, a campaign led by real estate developer Zachary Fisher and the Intrepid Museum Foundation saved the fourth Intrepid.

Fourth

Yorktown (CVS-10), former CVA-10, CV-10 & Bon Homme Richard

Renamed

26/09/42 

01/12/41

21/01/43

15/04/43

21/06/46(#)

09/01/47(D)

09/01/47 to June 1952(R)
Bremerton Group

06/52(RA)

15/12/52(#)

Recomm. 20/02/53

21/03/55(#)

Recomm. 2nd  14/10/55

Redes. CVS 01/09/57

27/06/70(D) 2nd

Philadelphia Group

01/06/73(S)

Dedicated as a Memorial 13/10/75

The Navy Department approved the donation of Yorktown to the Patriot's Point Development Authority, Charleston, South Carolina; formally Dedicated as a Memorial on the 200th anniversary of the Navy for a museum ship in South Carolina, formally Dedicated as a Memorial on 13 October 1975.

 

Antietam (CVS-36), former CVA-36 & CV-36 (35th CC)

15/03/43

20/08/44

28/01/45

Early 1949(D)

Early in 1949 – 06/12/50(R) Alameda, Ca.

06/12/50(RA)

Recomm. 17/01/51

April 1952(I)

Pacific Reserve Fleet

Summer 52(RA) - June 1952

Sep. to Dec. 1952

New York Naval Shipyard

Redes. CVS 01/08/53

21/04/57 to 23/10/62 (NAR)

07/01/63 to 01/05/73(#)

Philadelphia Group

01/05/73(S)

01/12/73 (SOLD)

Disposed of, sold by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) for scrapping 01/12/73 - to the Union Minerals & Alloys Corp. for scrapping.

On 1 October 1952 CVs reclassified CVA.

CV-10 recommissioned in Reserve for SCB-27A on 15 December 1952; completing SCB-27A January 1953; recommissioning on 20 February 1953 at Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Newport News, Virginia.

The Navy Department approved the donation of Yorktown to the Patriot's Point Development Authority, Charleston, South Carolina; formally Dedicated as a Memorial on the 200th anniversary of the Navy for a museum ship in South Carolina on 13 October 1975.

Shortly after 15 March 1974, a campaign led by real estate developer Zachary Fisher and the Intrepid Museum Foundation saved the fourth Intrepid.

CV-11 was first recommissioned on 9 February 1952 at San Francisco, Calif. for a SCB-27C conversion to a modern attack aircraft carrier that includes American-built steam catapults at Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Newport News, Virginia, aassigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet, departing San Francisco, Calif. 12 March 1952, on her South Pacific and South Atlantic deployment around Cape Horn for Norfolk, Va., in order to under go SCB-27C conversion to a modern attack aircraft carrier that includes American-built steam catapults at Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Newport News, Virginia.

CV-11got under way from Norfolk, Virginia for a 7-month modernization overhaul at the New York Navy Yard, Brooklyn, New York in late 1955.

 

 

U.S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS THAT PARTICPATED IN THE SPACE PROGRAM AND PRIMARY RECOVER SHIP (1962 to 1975)

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

SPACE PROGRAM

 AIR WING

TAIL CODE

DEPART

RETURN

USS Lake Champlain (CVS-39)

Prime recovery vessel for the Space Program Freedom 7

ASW Carrier

 

1 May 1961

 

USS Randolph (CVS-15)

Prime recovery vessel for the Space Program Mercury-Redstone 4

CVSG-58

AV

July 1961

 Aug. 1961

USS Randolph (CVS-15)

Prime recovery vessel for the first American orbital voyage in space

CVSG-58

AV

Feb. 1962

 Mar. 1962

USS Kearsarge (CVS-33)

Prime recovery vessel for the Project Mercury

CVSG-53

 

1 Aug. 1962

 

USS Kearsarge (CVS-33)

Prime recovery vessel for the Space Program Faith 7

CVSG-53

 

April 1963

3 Dec. 1963

USS Intrepid (CVS-11)

Prime recovery vessel for the first manned Gemini flight, Gemini 3 / Gemini 3 (03/23/1965
 to 03/23/1965)

 

 

23 March 1965

 

USS Wasp (CVS-18)

Prime recovery vessel for the Gemini IV Capsule and astronauts off the eastern seaboard Gemini IV (06/03/1965 to 06/07/1965)

CVSG-52

 

31 May 1965

mid June 1965

USS Lake Champlain (CVS-39)

Prime recovery vessel for the Gemini 5 / Gemini V (08/21/1965 to 8/29/1965)

 

 

5 Aug. 1965

 

USS Wasp (CVS-18)

Recovered the astronauts of Gemini VIA and VII after their splashdown off the eastern seaboard Gemini VI (12/15/1965 to 12/16/1965) and Gemini VII (12/04/1965 to 12/18/1965)

CVSG-52

 

16 Dec. 1965

22 Dec. 1965

USS Boxer (LPH-4), former CVS-21, CVA-21 & CV

Recovered the first unmanned spacecraft of the Apollo series, fired into suborbital flight by a Saturn 1B rocket

 

 

26 Feb. 1966

 

*USS Leonard F. Mason DD-852

Prime recovery vessel for the Gemini VIII (03/16/1966 to
3/16/1966)

 

 

March 1966

 

USS Wasp (CVS-18)

Prime recovery vessel for the Gemini IX-A (6/03/1966
6/06/1966)

 

 

June 1966

 

Not Reported

Gemini X (7/18/1966
7/21/1966)

 

 

July 1966

 

USS Hornet (CVS-12)

Prime recovery vessel for the unmanned Apollo AS-202 capsule “moon ship”

CVSG-57

NV

25 Aug. 1966

2 Sep. 1966

USS Guam LPH-9

Prime recovery vessel for the Gemini XI (9/12/1966
9/15/1966)

 

 

Sep. 1966

 

USS Wasp (CVS-18)

Prime recovery vessel for the Gemini XII recovery operation (11/11/1966 to 11/15/1966)

CVSG-52

 

5 Nov. 1966

18 Nov. 1966

USS Bennington (CVS-20)

Prime recovery vessel for the unmanned Apollo 4 mission and on 9 November 1967 recovered the capsule, which had splash downed 16 km from the ship

 

 

9 Nov. 1967

 

USS Essex (CVS-9)

Prime recovery vessel for the Apollo 7 mission

 

 

22 Oct. 1968

 

USS Arlington (AGMR-2)

Manned Spacecraft Recovery Force, Pacific - TF 130 Apollo 8

 

 

18 Dec. 1968

29 Dec. 1968

USS Arlington (AGMR-2)

Manned Spacecraft Recovery Force, Pacific - TF 130 Apollo 8

 

 

18 Dec. 1968

29 Dec. 1968

USS Princeton (LPH-5), former CVS-37, CVA-37, CV & Valley Forge

Prime recovery vessel for the prime recovery ship for Apollo 10, the lunar mission which paved the way for Apollo 11 and the first landing on the Moon

 

 

Apr. 1969

 

USS Arlington (AGMR-2)

Manned Spacecraft Recovery Force, Pacific - TF 130 - Apollo 10

 

 

2 May 1969

26 May 1969

USS Hornet (CVS-12)

Prime recovery vessel for Apollo 11

 

 

12 July 1969

1 Aug. 1969

USS Arlington (AGMR-2)

 

Manned Spacecraft Recovery Force, Pacific - TF 130 - Apollo 11

 

 

24 July 1969

 

USS Hornet (CVS-12)

Prime recovery vessel for Apollo 12

 

 

27 Oct. 1969

4 Dec. 1969

USS Ticonderoga (CVS-14)

Prime recovery vessel for the Apollo 16 moon mission capsule

 

 

April 1972

 

 

USS Lake Champlain (CVS-39) was selected as the prime recovery ship for the first manned space flight and sailed for the recovery area 1 May 1961, and was on station on the 5th when Comdr. Alan Shepard was recovered along with spacecraft Freedom 7 after splashdown, some 300 miles down range from Cape Kennedy. Helicopters from the carrier visually followed the descent of the capsule and were over the astronaut 2 minutes after the impact. They skillfully recovered Astronaut Sheppard and Freedom 7 and carried them safely to Lake Champlain's flight deck.

USS Randolph (CVS-15) was selected as the prime recovery ship for the second American (suborbital) spaceflight. Mercury-Redstone 4 was a Mercury program manned space mission launched on July 21, 1961 using a Redstone rocket. Its capsule was named Liberty Bell 7 and performed a suborbital flight piloted by astronaut Virgil I. "Gus" Grissom and Prime recovery vessel for Mercury-Atlas 6 "Friendship 7," with Astronaut John Glenn on his flight, the first American orbital voyage in space. After his historic three-orbit flight, he landed safely near the destroyer USS Noa (DD0841) from which he was transferred, by helicopter, to Randolph on 20 February1962.

Upon completion of repairs and training, USS Kearsarge (CVS-33) with CVSG-53 embarked departed Long Beach, Calif. 1 August 1962, operating in the Pacific missile range as a recovery ship in the Project Mercury orbital space flight of astronaut Walter Schirra.

USS Kearsarge (CVS-33) repeated her earlier splashdown recovery by plucking astronaut Gordon Cooper on 18 May 1963, after he orbited the earth 22 times in his capsule "Faith 7. After taking part in Fleet exercises off Puerto Rico, the carrier returned to Boston on 4 April. From 11 to 18 May, USS Wasp (CVS-18) took station off Bermuda as a backup recovery ship for Major Gordon Cooper's historic Mercury space capsule recovery. The landing occurred as planned in the mid-Pacific near Midway Atoll, and carrier USS Kearsage (CVA 33) picked up Cooper and his Faith 7 space craft. Wasp then resumed antisubmarine warfare exercises along the Atlantic seaboard and in the Caribbean until she underwent overhaul in the fall of 1963 for FRAM (Fleet rehabilitation and modernization) overhaul in the Boston Naval Shipyard. In March 1964, the carrier conducted sea trials out of Boston.

GT-03 Gemini 3 - On 23 March 1965 Lt. Comdr. John Young and Maj. Gus Grissom in Molly Brown splashed down some 50 miles from USS Intrepid (CVS-11) after history's first controlled re-entry into the earth's atmosphere ended the pair's nearly perfect three-orbit flight. A Navy helicopter lifted the astronauts from the spacecraft and flew them to Intrepid for medical examination and debriefing. Later Intrepid retrieved Molly Brown and returned the spaceship and astronauts to Cape Kennedy. March 23, 1965. Landing at 22deg26m North and 70deg 51min West. Miss distance from landing zone 111.1km (60nm). Recovered by Intrepid. Crew onboard in 70 min.

GT-04 Gemini IV - June 7, 1965. Landing was at 27deg 44min North and 74deg 11min West. Landing was 81.4km from attempted landing zone.

USS Lake Champlain (CVS-39) was selected as the prime recovery ship for the Gemini 5 / Gemini V - splashed down into the Atlantic 90 miles off target after a record-breaking eight-day space flight, and 45 minutes later, Navy frogmen from the backup recovery ship USS DuPont (DD-941) helped astronauts Gordon Cooper and Charles Conrad out of their space capsule and aboard a helicopter for the ride back to Lake Champlain. GT-05 Gemini V - August 29, 1965. Landing was at 29deg44min North and 69deg 45min West. Miss distance was 170.3km (92nm) (crew onboard in 89 min).

GT-06 Gemini VI-A - December 16, 1965. Landing was at 23deg 35min North and 67deg 50min West. Miss distance was 12.9km (7nm). Recovered by the USS Wasp (CVS-18) (crew onboard in 66min).

GT-07 Gemini VII - December 18, 1965. Landed at 25deg 25.1min North, 70.6deg 7min West Miss distance was 11.8km (6.4nm).

USS Boxer (LPH-4) participated in the U.S. space program in the South Atlantic as prime recovery for the first suborbital test of Saturn IB and Block I Apollo Command and Service Modules, when the first unmanned spacecraft of the Apollo series, was fired into suborbital flight by a Saturn IB AS-201 rocket from Cape Kennedy, Fla. on mission AS-201, at 16:12 GMT 26 February 1966, recovered in the southeast Atlantic Ocean, 200 miles east of Ascension Island by a helicopter from the ship, demonstrating heat shield; propellant pressure loss caused premature SM engine shutdown.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Apollo_missions

GT-08 Gemini VIII - March 17, 1966. Landing was at 25deg 13.8min North and 136deg 0min East. Pacific Ocean. Recovered by the USS Leonard F. Mason (DD-852) (crew onboard in 3 hours). “USS Boxer (LPH-4) participated in the U.S. space program off Bermuda as primary recovery ship for Gemini 8 manned space shot; technical difficulties required the splashdown off Okinawa and USS Leonard F. Mason (DD-852) was called upon in March 1965 to recover the vessel” (Ref. 843).

GT-09 Gemini IX-A June 6, 1966. Landing was at 27deg 52min N and 75deg 0.4min West. Miss distance .704 miles (.38 nm). Recovery ship USS Wasp (CVS-18) (crew onboard in 52 min).

GT-10 Gemini X - July 21, 1966. 4:07pm. Landing was at 26deg 44.7min North and 71deg 57min West. Miss distance was 6.2km (3.4 nm).

On 25 August 1966, USS Hornet (CVS-12) was designated primary Apollo recovery platform for the unmanned Apollo AS-202 capsule “moon ship” that rocketed three-quarters of the way around the globe in 93 minutes before splashdown 300 miles northeast of Wake Island.  Scorched from the heat of its re-entry into the earth's atmosphere, the Apollo space capsule, designed to carry American astronauts to the moon, was brought aboard Hornet after its test. Hornet off loaded the unmanned Apollo AS-202 capsule “moon ship” at NS Long Beach, Ca. 2 September 1966.

GT-11 Gemini XI - September 15, 1966. Landing was at 24deg 15.4min North and 70deg 0.0min West. Miss distance was 4.9km (2.65nm). Recovery ship USS Guam (crew onboard in 24 min). Apollo 11 was the spaceflight which landed the first humans, Neil Armstrong and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin, Jr, on Earth's Moon on July 20, 1969, at 20:17:39 UTC. The United States mission is considered the major accomplishment in the history of space exploration. Launched from the Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39 in Merritt Island, Florida on July 16, Apollo 11 was the fifth manned mission, and the third lunar mission, of NASA's Apollo program. The crew consisted of Armstrong as Commander and Aldrin as Lunar Module Pilot, with Command Module Pilot Michael Collins. Armstrong and Aldrin landed in the Sea of Tranquillity and became the first humans to walk on the Moon on July 21. Their Lunar Module, Eagle, spent 21 hours 31 minutes on the lunar surface, while Collins remained in orbit in the Command/Service Module, Columbia.[2] The three astronauts returned to Earth on July 24, landing in the Pacific Ocean. They brought back 47.5 pounds (21.5 kg) of lunar rocks. Apollo 11 fulfilled U.S. President John F. Kennedy's goal of reaching the Moon before the Soviet Union by the end of the 1960s, which he had expressed during a 1961 mission statement before the United States Congress: "I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the Moon and returning him safely to the Earth."[3] Six additional Apollo missions flew to the Moon and five landed between 1969 and 1972. The three astronauts returned to Earth and splashed down in the Pacific ocean, to be picked up by the USS Hornet (CVS-12).

2. NASA Apollo 11 Timeline

3. Stenger, Richard (May 25, 2001). "Man on the Moon: Kennedy speech ignited the dream". CNN. Archived from the original on June 6, 2010. http://web.archive.org/web/20100606035837 - http://archives.cnn.com/2001/TECH/space/05/25/kennedy.moon

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_11

Gemini XII spacecraft recovery took place on 15 November 1966 when the space capsule splashdown occurred within three miles of USS Wasp (CVS-18). Capt. James A. Lovell and Maj. Edwin E. Aldrin were lifted by helicopter hoist to the deck of Wasp and there enjoyed two days of celebration (5 to 18 November 1966) - GT-12 Gemini XII - Nov 15, 1966. Landed at 24deg 35min North 69deg 57min West. Miss distance was 4.8km (2.6nm).

USS Essex (CVS-9) was scheduled to be the prime recovery carrier for the ill fated Apollo 1 space mission. It was to pick up the Apollo 1 astronauts north of Puerto Rico on March 7, 1967 after a 14-day spaceflight. However, the mission did not take place because on January 27, 1967, the Apollo 1 crew were killed by a flash fire in their spacecraft on the launch pad at Kennedy Space Center.

USS Essex (CVS-9) was the prime recovery carrier for the Apollo 7 mission. It recovered the Apollo 7 crew on October 22, 1968 after a splashdown north of Puerto Rico.