5th and 6th Fleet

 

 

United States Navy Fifth Fleet (insignia).jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Fifth_Fleet

 

    

 

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=196964372840&set=a.441216332840.223327.121672832840&type=1&theater

 

US Naval Forces Central Command and 5th Fleet

 

“The Fifth Fleet of the United States Navy is responsible for naval forces in the Persian Gulf, Red Sea, Arabian Sea, and coast off East Africa as far south as Kenya. It shares a commander and headquarters with U.S. Naval Forces Central Command (NAVCENT).

 

Fifth Fleet/NAVCENT is a component command of, and reports to, U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM)” (Ref. 313A).

 

“U.S. Fifth Fleet (C5F), an Echelon III command, supports all naval operations in the U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) area of responsibility (AOR). It encompasses about 7.5 million square miles and includes the Arabian Gulf, Red Sea, Gulf of Oman, and parts of the Indian Ocean. This expanse, comprised of 25 countries, includes Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Iran, Iraq, Pakistan, and Somalia.

 

The usual force of 25-plus ships, with about 1,000 people ashore and 15,000 afloat, consists of a Carrier Battle Group, Amphibious Ready Group, combat aircraft, and other support units and ships. Fifth Fleet exemplifies the Department of the Navy's strategic concept "Forward... From the sea," by providing the ability to respond immediately to any emerging crisis from peace-keeping and humanitarian missions to asserting necessary force in regional conflicts” (Ref. 313A & 313A1).

 

CUSNC Headquarters

http://www.cusnc.navy.mil/command/history.html

 

Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Central Command
Commander, U.S. 5th Fleet Public Affairs Office at 011-973-1785-4027.
For Naval Support Activity Bahrain at 11-973-1785-4000.
This is an Official U.S. Navy Web Site. GILS# 002176

 

Mission

 

“U.S. Naval Forces Central Command conducts persistent maritime operations to forward U.S. interests, deter and counter disruptive countries, defeat violent extremism and strengthen partner nations’ maritime capabilities in order to promote a secure maritime environment in the USCENTCOM area of responsibility.

Vision

 

 U.S. Naval Forces Central Command will advance the interests of the United States and the security and prosperity of the region by building and effectively employing forward, capable and Coalition-focused forces across the full spectrum of maritime operations.  We will endeavor to prevent conflict but remain prepared to win decisively when directed.

 

Guiding Principles

 

USNAVCENT will consistently strive to achieve higher levels of operational excellence, guided by the following principles:

 

An organization that . . .
Is imbued with integrity, trust and teamwork.
Accepts and applies accountability.
Gives and demands professional respect and conduct.

Is committed to. . .
Respecting the rule of law as well as international and regional customs, to include a deep respect for religion and culture.
Contributing to maritime security as well as deepening and broadening regional partnerships.
Providing a persistent presence. The U.S. Navy has been in the region for 60 years and will be here for decades to come.
Remaining strong by exercising and operating across the full spectrum of naval operations.

 

Accomplishing the Mission

 

“In order to accomplish our mission of supporting MSO in the region, we engage; perform visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS); protect key infrastructure nodes; deter and disrupt piracy; assist mariners in distress; provide humanitarian assistance and conduct combat operations” (Ref. 313A10).

 

NAVCENT Objectives

 

Provide persistent full-spectrum effects as directed by CENTCOM

Support and defend US, coalition and partner interests in the maritime environment

Defeat terrorist actions in the maritime environment

Diminish the influence of military posturing by disruptive countries

Maintain and enhance warfighting proficiency for major combat operations of US Navy, joint and coalition forces

Forge and improve partnerships with regional naval forces and other maritime entities

Deter and disrupt proliferation, transport and delivery of weapons of mass destruction/effects Sea Lanes of Communication

 

Coalition maritime forces operate under international maritime conventions to ensure security and safety in international waters so that all commercial shipping can operate freely while transiting the region.

 

Engagement

 

Provides a mechanism to create a broad-based maritime coalition actively engaged in countering the terrorist threat both at sea and ashore. Almost all of our coalition partners contribute maritime forces such as ships, boarding teams, maritime patrol aircraft, intelligence analysts, and staff augmentees, to support ongoing operations. Local countries have a vested interest in interoperability, intelligence sharing, and assistance with deterrence against international terrorist organizations (ITOs) that pose a threat to key infrastructure.

 

Visit, Board, Search and Seizure (VBSS)

 

Pressurizes the entire maritime environment, playing a significant role in shaping the environment and setting the conditions for other forces to actively and directly engage ITOs. Intercept vessels that could support ITOs by transferring personnel, drugs, weapons, etc. Intended to detect, deter, and deny ITOs the use of the maritime environment.

 

Protection of Key Infrastructure Nodes

 

In the North Arabian Gulf, multinational forces work directly with Iraqi maritime forces to prevent attacks against oil terminals that provide a source of Iraq's revenue. Throughout the region, U.S. maritime forces provide assistance with training and intelligence sharing to its allies for the protection of key infrastructure nodes in the region. These key infrastructures form the foundation for much of the region's economic growth, stability and prosperity and can significantly impact upon the global economy.

 

Deter and Disrupt Piracy

 

Coalition maritime forces answer calls for assistance against pirates in addition to looking for evidence of piracy during routine boardings. Repression of piracy, which is an historical Navy mission, is still central today.

 

Assist Mariners in Distress

 

Coalition forces have a longstanding tradition of helping mariners in distress, providing medical assistance, engineering assistance, and search and rescue.

 

Humanitarian Assistance

 

Coalition maritime forces were called on to support tsunami relief efforts both within the region and outside after a catastrophic tsunami struck parts of Southeast Asia, Sri Lanka, India, Seychelles, and Somalia Dec. 26, 2004. Coalition maritime assets were flexible enough to continue the maritime operation mission while simultaneously equipped to help deliver relief supplies, provide medical support, and assist with clean up efforts.

 

Combat Operations

 

Maritime forces maintain the capability to project power ashore, to conduct sustained combat operations in support of coalition land commanders, provide air support to multinational forces on the ground as well as conduct long range strikes with aircraft and Tomahawk Land Attack cruise Missiles against enemy target” (Ref.. 313B12).

 

Area of Responsibility

 

“Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Central Command/ Commander, 5th Fleet's area of responsibility encompasses about 2.5 million square miles of water area and includes the Arabian Gulf, Red Sea, Gulf of Oman and parts of the Indian Ocean. This expanse, comprised of 20 countries, includes three critical choke points at the Strait of Hormuz, the Suez Canal and the Strait of Bab al Mandeb at the southern tip of Yemen. http://www.cusnc.navy.mil/mission/mission.html 

 

Area of Responsibility

 

US Navy has maintained a regional presence for more than 60 years.

1949 - Established Middle East Force to provide a regular presence

1971 - Leased part of a former British base from Bahrain to become Administrative Support Unit Bahrain

1995 - US FIFTH Fleet reestablished

1999 - Naval Support Activity Bahrain renamed to reflect its broader support role

 

Countries in AOR: Afghanistan, Bahrain, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan, Yemen” (Ref. 313A10).

 

U.S. 5th Fleet History

 

“In 1879, USS Ticonderoga was the first U.S. warship to sail through the Strait of Hormuz. After World War II, U.S. and international interest in the Middle East began to rise” (Ref. 313A11).

 

“The Commander in Chief, United States Fleet, Admiral Ernest King, established numbered fleets March 15, 1943, as a basis for task force designations and for specific geographic areas. On that date, the existing South Pacific Force, commanded by Vice Admiral William Halsey, became the THIRD Fleet, and the title FIFTH Fleet was designated for a fleet that would operate under the Pacific Fleet.

 

When major offensive operations began in the Central Pacific in the summer of 1943, Vice Admiral Raymond Spruance became Commander, Central Pacific Force and Commander, FIFTH Fleet. In August 1944, Vice Admiral Spruance dropped the Central Pacific Force title, retaining only Commander, FIFTH Fleet. As naval activity in the Central Pacific increased and operations diminished in the South Pacific, the THIRD and FIFTH Fleets were melded into a single organization, but the title varied, depending on whether Vice Admiral Halsey, Commander, THIRD Fleet or Vice Admiral Spruance, Commander, FIFTH Fleet, actually exercised command. While one admiral commanded the Fleet in a specific operation, the other admiral was ashore with his staff planning the next major offensive. Vice Admiral Spruance served as FIFTH Fleet operational commander for most of the war” (Ref. 313A1).

 

“The Fifth Fleet was initially established on 26 April 1944 from Central Pacific Force under the command of Admiral Raymond Spruance and disbanded after the war. The ships of the Fifth Fleet also formed the basis of the Third Fleet, which was the designation of the "Big Blue Fleet" when under the command of Admiral William F. Halsey. Spruance and Halsey would alternate command of the fleet for major operations, allowing the other admiral and his staff time to prepare for the subsequent one. A secondary benefit was confusing the Japanese into thinking that they were actually two separate fleets as the fleet designation flipped back and forth. Following the end of World War II, the 5th Fleet was deactivated as an operational command echelon within the U.S. Navy” (Ref. 313A).

 

“One of the most striking operations executed by the FIFTH Fleet was the capture of the Japanese island of Okinawa. Other battles involving the FIFTH Fleet included the Mariana Islands Operations, the Battle OF the Philippine Sea and the Iwo Jima Operation. Vice Admiral John H. Towers relieved Vice Admiral Spruance as Commander, FIFTH Fleet November 8, 1945. January 18, 1946, Vice Admiral Frederick C. Sherman became the third Commander of the FIFTH Fleet.

 

March 26, 1945, Commander, SEVENTH Fleet assumed responsibility for the control of the areas and forces assigned to FIFTH Fleet, and the Commander, FIFTH Fleet staff moved ashore on the West Coast. Vice Admiral Alfred E. Montgomery assumed command of the FIFTH Fleet September 5, 1946, and in January 1947, FIFTH Fleet was disestablished.

 

The FIFTH Fleet existed only in history for 48 years after it was disestablished in January 1947” (Ref. 313A1).

 

“The U.S. Navy established its first command in the Middle East January 1, 1949. Known as the Persian Gulf Area Command, its forces consisted of two destroyers and a small seaplane tender. Shore support was provided by buildings rented from the British Royal Navy at its installation HMS Juffair in the Gulf state of Bahrain. Bahrain, like many Gulf emirates, was a British protectorate at the time.

 

The Persian Gulf Area Command was renamed the Middle East Force August 16, 1949. No permanent flagship was assigned, so duty rotated between three former seaplane tenders: USS DUXBURY BAY, USS GREENWICH BAY, and USS VALCOUR” (Ref. 359). 

 

“In 1950, the U.S. Navy leased office space from the British” (Ref. 313A1).

 

“For the early years of its existence, its forces normally consisted of an Aircraft Carrier Battle Group (CVBG), an Amphibious Ready Group (ARG), surface combatants, submarines, maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircraft, and logistics ships” (Ref. 359). 

 

Middle East Force

 

“USS VALCOUR became the first permanent flagship for the Middle East Force in 1961 after an extensive overhaul and redesignation as a miscellaneous command ship” (Ref. 313A).

 

“In 1971, when Bahrain achieved full independence, the U.S. Navy leased part of the former British base and named it Administrative Support Unit, Bahrain. The name was changed to Naval Support Activity, Bahrain in 1999, to reflect its broader support role” (Ref. 313A & 313A11).

 

“Through the 1980s several frigate- and destroyer-type ships and minesweepers were assigned to the Middle East Force as well as support ships.

 

Prior to the first Gulf War in 1990-1991, U.S. naval operations in the Persian Gulf region were directed by the Commander, Middle Eastern Force (COMMIDEASTFOR). Since this organization was considered insufficiently equipped to manage large scale combat operations during the Gulf War, the Seventh Fleet—primarily responsible for the Western Pacific and Indian Ocean and normally based in Japan—was given the temporary task of managing the force during the period” (Ref. 313 & 313A).

 

After the 2 August 1990 Iraqi occupation of Kuwait, the largest armada since World War II assembled in the Gulf in support of Operation Desert Shield and ultimately Operation Desert Storm in 1991” (Ref. 359). 

 

“Middle East Force ships were the first U.S. military units to take action following the August 2, 1990, invasion of Kuwait when they began Maritime Interception Operations in support of United Nations sanctions against Iraq. In January 1991, with the beginning of Operation Desert Storm, the Middle East Force was absorbed into U.S. Naval Forces Central Command, the Naval component of the U.S. Central Command. Central Command is responsible for all U.S. Military activity in the Middle East and eastern Africa.

 

“The Middle East Force found itself operating under operational control of the US Naval Forces Central Command (NAVCENT), an Echelon II command, is the naval component commander for US Central Command (CENTCOM) responsible for combat operations in the Middle East and eastern Africa, and exercises command and control over all naval operations throughout the AOR from a headquarters located in Manama, Bahrain, where it remained following the war. During Desert Storm in 1991, the Commander, Seventh Fleet served as naval component commander for Central Command. Since the Gulf War, NAVCENT fulfilled the roles of both a naval component command and as the fleet command. Ships from the East and West Coasts comprised the fleet, but it operated without a traditionally understood structure or number” (Ref. 1-Saratoga, 72, 313 & 359).

 

“In the aftermath of the 1990/91 Gulf War, U.S. Naval Forces Central Command ships and those of the coalition partners undertook the largest mine clearing operation since World War II. Nearly 1,300 sophisticated sea mines of various types were swept from the Arabian Gulf, providing the safest passage for naval and merchant ships in decades.

 

The staff of U.S. Naval Forces Central Command (NAVCENT) moved ashore in Manama, Bahrain in 1993 and USS LA SALLE departed for overhaul and reassignment.

 

“In the era of the first Gulf War, the Persian Gulf, Red Sea, and Arabian Sea was patrolled by ships from the East and West Coasts, but no defined fleet existed” (Ref. 313 & 313A).

 

“The U.S. FIFTH Fleet was reestablished July 1, 1995 in the Central Command area of responsibility as a second responsibility of Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Central Command. Vice Admiral Scott Redd became the fifth Commander of FIFTH Fleet followed by Vice Admiral Thomas B. Fargo in June 1996. Vice Admiral Charles W. Moore, Jr. assumed command of FIFTH Fleet on July 27, 1998” (Ref. 313A1).

 

“In 1995, U.S. FIFTH Fleet and U.S. Naval Forces Central Command (NAVCENT) were recommissioned to command the afloat units that rotationally deploy or surge from the United States plus a few smaller ships that are based in the Gulf for longer periods. Ships rotationally deploy to the U.S. FITH Fleet from the Pacific and Atlantic Fleets” (Ref. 313A11).

 

“From the Fifth Fleets reacactivation in July 1995 (disactivated for 48-years), replacing COMMIDEASTFOR, when the course of events in the middle east made a new numbered fleet necessary, and it now directs operations in the Persian Gulf, Red Sea, and Arabian Sea. Its headquarters are at NSA Bahrain located in Manama, Bahrain” (Ref. 313 & 313A).

 

“With the War on Terrorism, the naval strategy of the US has changed. The regular deployments of the Cold War are now a thing of the past. Consequently, the policy of always maintaining a certain number of ships in various parts of the world is also over” (Ref. 313G & 359). 

 

“Fifth Fleets usual configuration now includes a Carrier Strike Group, Amphibious Ready Group or Expeditionary Strike Group, and other ships and aircraft with almost 15,000 people serving afloat and 1,000 support personnel ashore” (Ref. 313A & 313A1).

 

“In February 2002 Combined Maritime Forces command was established to provide coordinated Coalition operations” (Ref. 313A11).

 

“The forces of the 5th Fleet peaked in early 2003, when five USN aircraft carriers (CV and CVNs), six USN amphibious assault ships known as LHAs and LHDs and their embarked USMC air ground combat elements, their escorting and supply vessels, and over 30 Royal Navy vessels were under its command” (Ref. 313A).

 

“In the Persian Gulf, United States Coast Guard surface ships attached to the Fifth Fleet were under the command of Destroyer Squadron 50 (CDS-50) commanded by Captain Peterson of the Navy” (Ref. 313A & 313A2).

 

Boutwell, Walnut, and the four patrol boats were part of this group. The shore detachments, MCSD and PATFOR SWA also operated under the command of CDS-50. For actual operations, the Coast Guard forces were part of two different task forces. The surface units were part of Task Force 55 (CTF-55). Command of CTF-55 actually shifted during OIF. Initially, Rear Admiral Costello, Commander of the Constellation Battle Group, commanded CTF-55. The surface forces were designated Task Group 55.1 (TG-55.1) with CDS-50 as the task group commander. In mid-April, the Constellation Battle Group left the NAG and CDS-50 became the staff commanding TF-55 for the remainder of OIF.

 

In the aftermath of the fall of Baghdad in April 2003, the very large force of ships was quickly drawn down. Until and unless further very serious tensions occur in the area, forces are likely to remain at a lower level than has been the case in recent years” (Ref. 313A).

 

“Since naval forces routinely make up over 70 percent of all US military presence in theater, NAVCENT’s location on the scene is an integral part of USCENTCOM's ability to successfully execute a theater strategy. From major exercises to day-to-day real world operations such as enforcement of UN sanctions, NAVCENT plays a major role in maintaining stability and deterring aggression in the region. The vast majority of NAVCENT’s operating forces are rotationally deployed to the region from either the Pacific Fleet or the Atlantic Fleet” (Ref. 359).

 

Royal Navy Assumes Command of CTF IM

By Lt. Simon Bellamy, Royal Navy, CTF IM Media Officer

 

MANAMA, Bahrain – Royal Navy Commodore James Morse relieved Rear Adm. T.C. Cropper as Commander Task Force Iraqi Maritime (CTF IM) during a change of command ceremony today aboard Naval Support Activity Bahrain.

 

This marks the first change of command for CTF IM, since the task force’s establishment in January of this year.

 

“I am delighted to be leading a UK-U.S. team as CTF IM,” said Morse. “We have a vital role to play in assisting Iraqi forces with security in their territorial waters, and we look forward to building on the excellent work of Rear Adm. Cropper and his staff.”

 

Previously known as Combined Task Force 158, CTF IM is a joint UK-U.S. naval force operating in the North Arabian Gulf, which helps provide maritime security. Its roles are to assist with protecting Iraq’s offshore oil platforms and training Iraqi forces. These tasks are vital to the continuing development of the Iraqi economy and to stability in the area.

 

CTF IM consists of a range of naval forces, including destroyers or frigates, support ships, aircraft and patrol vessels.

 

In a separate ceremony on the Al Basrah Oil Terminal, Capt. Keith Blount, Royal Navy, relieved Capt. Karl Van Deusen USN and assumed responsibility as the on-scene commander for CTF IM which is responsible for providing security to the oil platforms.

 

“The oil platforms are essential to Iraq’s prosperity, and my UK-U.S. task group will work closely with our Iraqi colleagues to provide assistance as they continue to develop their already impressive maritime security capabilities,” said Blount.

 

U.S. and UK forces have maintained a presence in the North Arabian Gulf since 2003, assisting the Iraqi Navy by helping provide security to their oil platforms, which account for approximately 70 to 85 percent of Iraq’s revenue.

 

Coalition forces have operated jointly with Iraqi Navy sailors and marines, training them in point-defence force protection and visit, board, search and seizure operations.

 

The U.S. and UK will continue to conduct Maritime Security Operations (MSO) in the North Arabian Gulf and provide assistance as requested. MSO help set the conditions for security, which promotes stability and prosperity in the North Arabian Gulf. These operations protect Iraq’s sea-based infrastructure. MSO complement the counterterrorism and security efforts of regional nations and seek to disrupt illegal use of the maritime environment as a venue for attack or to transport personnel, weapons or other material” (Ref. 313G).

 Royal Navy Assumes Command of CTF IM.

 

Royal Navy Commodore James Morse relieved Rear Adm. T.C. Cropper as Commander Task Force Iraqi Maritime (CTF IM) during a change of command ceremony today aboard Naval Support Activity Bahrain.

 

This marks the first change of command for CTF IM, since the task force’s establishment in January of this year.

 

“I am delighted to be leading a UK-U.S. team as CTF IM,” said Morse. “We have a vital role to play in assisting Iraqi forces with security in their territorial waters, and we look forward to building on the excellent work of Rear Adm. Cropper and his staff.”

Previously known as Combined Task Force 158, CTF IM is a joint UK-U.S. naval force operating in the North Arabian Gulf, which helps provide maritime security. Its roles are to assist with protecting Iraq’s offshore oil platforms and training Iraqi forces. These tasks are vital to the continuing development of the Iraqi economy and to stability in the area.

 

CTF IM consists of a range of naval forces, including destroyers or frigates, support ships, aircraft and patrol vessels.

 

In a separate ceremony on the Al Basrah Oil Terminal, Capt. Keith Blount, Royal Navy, relieved Capt. Karl Van Deusen USN and assumed responsibility as the on-scene commander for CTF IM which is responsible for providing security to the oil platforms.

 

“The oil platforms are essential to Iraq’s prosperity, and my UK-U.S. task group will work closely with our Iraqi colleagues to provide assistance as they continue to develop their already impressive maritime security capabilities,” said Blount.

 

U.S. and UK forces have maintained a presence in the North Arabian Gulf since 2003, assisting the Iraqi Navy by helping provide security to their oil platforms, which account for approximately 70 to 85 percent of Iraq’s revenue.

 

Coalition forces have operated jointly with Iraqi Navy sailors and marines, training them in point-defence force protection and visit, board, search and seizure operations.

 

The U.S. and UK will continue to conduct Maritime Security Operations (MSO) in the North Arabian Gulf and provide assistance as requested. MSO help set the conditions for security, which promotes stability and prosperity in the North Arabian Gulf. These operations protect Iraq’s sea-based infrastructure. MSO complement the counterterrorism and security efforts of regional nations and seek to disrupt illegal use of the maritime environment as a venue for attack or to transport personnel, weapons or other material” (Ref. 313A1).

 

 “With the War on Terrorism, the naval strategy of the US has changed. The regular deployments of the Cold War are now a thing of the past. Consequently, the policy of always maintaining a certain number of ships in various parts of the world is also over” (Ref. 313G).

 

MODIFICATION OF OFFICER IN CHARGE, PATROL AND

RECONNAISSANCE FORCE FIFTH FLEET DETACHMENT BAHRAINThursday, October 13, 2011 - Ref. 313A7

 

File:USN Fleets (2009).png

 

The Fifth Fleet's area of responsibility, 2009.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:USN_Fleets_%282009%29.png

 

Composition

 

· Task Force 50, Battle Force (~1 x Forward Deployed Carrier Strike Group)

· Task Force 51, Amphibious Force (~1 x Expeditionary Strike Group)/Expeditionary Strike Group Five/TF 59 (Manama, Bahrain)

· Task Force 52, mining/demining force

· Task Force 53, Logistics Force (313A3)/Sealift Logistics Command Central, Military Sealift Command (MSC replenishment ships plus USN MH-53E Sea Stallion helicopters and C-130 Hercules, C-9 Skytrain II and/or C-40 Clipper aircraft)

· Task Force 54, (dual-hatted as Task Force 74) Submarine Force

· Task Force 55, Operation Iraqi Freedom: Constellation Carrier Strike Force; June 2003: mine clearing force, including elements from the U.S. Navy Marine Mammal Program

· Task Force 56, Navy Expeditionary Combat Command force.( 313A4)

o CTG 56.1 Explosive Ordnance Disposal / Expeditionary Diving and Salvage (313A5)

o CTG 56.2 Naval Construction Forces

o CTG 56.3 Expeditionary Logistics Support; Provides logistics support for USN/USA/USMC, cargo movement and customs throughout AOR

o CTG 56.4 Riverine; Provides riverineprotection of waterways from illegal smuggling of weapons, drugs and people

o CTG 56.5 Maritime Expeditionary Security; Provides anti-Terrorism/Force Protection of land/port/littoral waterway operations for USN and Coalition assets, as well as point defense of strategic platforms and MSC vessels

o CTG 56.6 Expeditionary Combat Readiness; Provides administrative “Sailor support” for all Individual Augmentees, and administers the Navy Individual Augmentee Combat Training Course and Warrior Transition Program

o Task Force 57, (dual-hatted as Task Force 72) Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (P-3 and EP-3 Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Aircraft)

o Task Group 57.1 - Lockheed EP-3, VQ-1 (Globalsecurity.org)

o Task Group 57.2 - in October 2006, consisted of VP-8, VP-9, VP-16, and VP-46. ([9])

o Note that as of October 13, 2011, Officer in Charge, Patrol and Reconnaissance Force Fifth Fleet Det Bahrain (COMPATRECONFORFIFTHFLT DET BAHRAIN (44468)) has been modified to Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing FIVE SEVEN. (313A7)

o Task Force 58, Maritime Surveillance Force (Northern Persian Gulf)

o Task Force 59, Expeditionary Force/Contingency Force (when required, e.g. July–August 2006 Lebanon evacuation operation, in conjunction with Joint Task Force Lebanon) In February 2007 it was conducting Maritime Security Operations (313A8) and as of Nov. 2, 2007, it was running a crisis management exercise.

 

Coalition Forces Maritime Component Command

 

Together with Naval Forces Central Command, Fifth Fleet oversees five naval task forces monitoring maritime activity:

 

· Combined Task Force 158 in the North Persian Gulf that protects the Iraqi oil terminals of ABOT and KAAOT; now CTF IM ([2])

· Combined Task Force 150 that patrols from Hormuz, halfway across the Arabia Sea, South as far as the Seychelles, through the Gulf of Aden, up through the strait between Djibouti and Yemen known as the Bab Al Mandeb and into the Red Sea and, finally, around the Horn of Africa;

· Combined Task Force 152 patrols the Persian Gulf from the northern end where area of responsibility of CTF 158 ends and down to the Strait of Hormuz between Oman and Iran where the area of responsibility for CTF 150 begins;

· CTF 151 patrols mostly the same area as CTF 150 but is primarily focused on deterring and disrupting Somalian pirate attack on leisure boats and commercial shipping;

CTF 52 (as above) patrols the same area as CTF 152 but is focused on countermining/demining activity. (313A9)

 

US Sixth Fleet Logo high resolution version.jpg

 

Sixth Fleet


Naval Striking and Support Forces, Southern Europe (STRIKFORSOUTH
)

 

“When considering American naval engagement in Europe, one is bound to consider the Mediterranean Sea as the major theater of operations, for it is by far the biggest inland sea in Europe and a major geographical factor for strategic and political planning. No less than three continents with thirteen nations plus a later dismembered Yugoslavia border the sea since the end of World War II. The access to the Black Sea through the Bosporus, the Adriatic Sea separating Italy from the Balkans, and the Suez Canal are further geostrategic points of significance. Before the accession of Greece and Turkey into the North Atlantic Treaty Organization in 1952, the Mediterranean was the continent's 'soft underbelly' - the weakest flank for Europe and the Western Alliance. Thus, American naval presence in the Mediterranean will briefly be considered at this point. After all, a strong American containment policy in order to deter Soviet expansion and a possible attack on Central Europe and West Germany depended on a comprehensive forward defense strategy from Cyprus to the North Cape” (Ref. 313ES).

 

“The Sixth Fleet is the United States Navy's operational fleet and staff of United States Naval Forces Europe. The Sixth Fleet is based in Naples, Italy” (Ref. 313E & 313EA).

 

“The Sixth Fleet conducts the full range of Maritime Operations and Theater Security Cooperation missions in concert with coalition, joint, interagency and other parties in order to advance security and stability in Europe and Africa.

 

The Commander, Sixth Fleet, under CINCUSNAVEUR, plans for and conducts offensive or defensive naval combat operations when directed by CINCUSNAVEUR or other competent authority in order to establish and maintain control of the waters of, and air space over, the Mediterranean Sea, approaches thereto, adjacent inland areas, and the Black Sea. The Commander, Sixth Fleet plans and conducts contingency operations including evacuation of U.S. citizens; protects U.S. interests when directed by higher authority; provides a U.S. Navy presence in the Mediterranean area in support of U.S. Navy overseas diplomacy objectives and U.S. foreign policy; and carries out training operations to maintain fleet readiness to carry out wartime, contingency, and peacetime responsibilities.

Commander, Sixth Fleet has both U.S. national and NATO responsibilities. He reports to the Commander-In-Chief, U.S. Naval Forces, Europe (CinCUSNavEur) in the U.S. chain of command and to CinCSouth when the Sixth Fleet operates as part of NATO as StrikForSouth. The principal striking power of the Sixth Fleet resides in its aircraft carriers and the modern jet aircraft, its submarines, and its reinforced battalion of U.S. Marines on board amphibious ships deployed in the Mediterranean. Altogether, approximately 40 ships, 175 aircraft and 21,000 people make up the Sixth Fleet” (Ref. 313ES).

 

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/images/tf-6-fleet.gif

 

“Regional Headquarters, AFSOUTH exercises direct command and control of Naval Striking and Support Forces, Southern Europe (STRIKFORSOUTH), which constitutes NATO's sole maritime permanent Regional Reaction Force Headquarters. STRIKFORSOUTH is commanded by a U.S. Navy three-star admiral who also commands the U.S. Sixth Fleet. The STRIKFORSOUTH staff, comprised of 93 allied officers and enlisted personnel (provided by Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Turkey, UK and USA), is located at RHQs AFSOUTH in Naples, Italy.

 

STRIKFORSOUTH's primary mission is to execute maritime power projection operations during peace or crisis in support of NATO objectives. It does this principally through the assets resident in Carrier Battle Groups, amphibious forces, and finally through its many cruise missile capable platforms.

 

STRIKFORSOUTH is the only Headquarters in the Southern Region which may be assigned the triad of air, naval, and land forces, all of which are capable of responding immediately to the entire risk spectrum facing NATO. Subordinate commands include Task Force 502 (Carrier Forces), Task Force 503 (Amphibious Forces), Task Force 504 (Landing Forces), Task Force 505 (Logistics Forces), and Task Force 506 (Special Operations Forces).

 

Aircraft Carriers are one of the major building blocks of NATO's Southern Region power projection strategy. Several nations contribute their carrier assets to STRIKFORSOUTH for operational exercises or real world contingencies. Flying from these carriers are some of the world's most sophisticated fighter-attack, electronic warfare, and reconnaissance aircraft. Surface and subsurface naval forces, contributed by NATO nations, are also a key element of the power projection triad. Some of these ships have the capability of delivering sophisticated land attack cruise missiles in defense strategy.

 

STRIKFORSOUTH has developed and refined the Multinational Amphibious Task Force (MNATF) concept for the Southern Region. These MNATFs are high readiness, multi-purpose forces, task organized by mission, and supported by many NATO nations. They include Special Operations and Reconnaissance Specialists and are able to respond to the full spectrum of possible missions, from supporting humanitarian relief efforts to full-scale combat operations.

 

The peacetime mission of STRIKFORSOUTH is to assure the readiness of NATO's maritime power projection forces in the Mediterranean and to contribute to regional stability through dialogue and cooperation, including active participation in NATO's Partnership for Peace program.

 

The United States' naval experience in the Mediterranean began as early as 1801. Commodore Richard Dale was placed in command of four ships with orders to patrol the Mediterranean and prevent the navies and pirates of the Barbary Coast from interfering with and seizing American merchant shipping. Dale and subsequent commanders of American fleets in the Mediterranean quickly found out what it took to assemble a fleet and fight so far from American shores.

 

Today's 6th Fleet carries on American naval presence in the Mediterranean - to maintain peace and stability in this vital area of the world. The U.S. presence in the Mediterranean Sea is now a fundamental element of U.S. and NATO defense strategies. The Cold War occupied much of the fleet's attention until the breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991. The Sailors and Marines of the 6th Fleet, along with other U.S. air and land forces, worked with America's NATO allies to counter a substantial Soviet threat to the stability of the Mediterranean region.

 

The end of the Cold War didn't bring an end to the 6th Fleet's mission. The threat from the Soviet Union was replaced by threats from civil and ethnic wars in the Balkans, Middle East and on the African continent. According to 6th Fleet officials, 80 percent of the contingencies the United States responded to since the breakup of the Soviet Union have taken place in the 6th Fleet's area of responsibility. Furthermore, the 6th Fleet carries out more than 80 joint and combined exercises each year, plans more than 1,000 port visits a year and provides officer exchanges with Mediterranean and Black Sea area nations” (Ref. 313ES).

 

“The United States has maintained a naval presence in the Mediterranean since the early 19th century, when U.S. Naval forces first engaged the Barbary Pirates to prevent them from interfering with commercial shipping.

 

Six Fleet History

 

"Millions for defense, but not a penny for tribute! In 1946, President Truman dispatched battleship Missouri to the Eastern Mediterranean to counter Soviet threats to Turkey and Iran. The earliest unit was the Mediterranean Squadron” (Ref. 313E & 313E).

 

“On February 1, 1946, U.S. Naval Forces, Northwest African Waters, was redesignated U.S. Naval Forces, Mediterranean” (Ref. 313E & 313EC).

 

“The force was responsible to U.S. Naval Forces, Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean in London, and had as its flagship, a destroyer tender, anchored at Naples, Italy. In 1946, President Truman dispatched the battleship Missouri to the Eastern Mediterranean, ostensibly to return the body of Munir Ertegun, former Turkish Ambassador to Washington, back to Istanbul. However perhaps a much stronger motive was to demonstrate U.S. power in view of Soviet threats to Turkey and Iran. The cruiser Dayton relieved the tender Shenandoah as flagship and began operating with the fleet. In June 1946 USS Fargo (CL-106), flying the flag of Vice Admiral Bernhard Bieri, Commander, Naval Forces Mediterranean, was despatched to Trieste” (Ref. 313E & 313ED).

 

“On 5 September 1946, USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVB-42), flying the flag of Rear Admiral J.H. Cassady, Commander Carrier Division 1 ) 313EE), and accompanied by USS Little Rock, USS Cone (DD-866), USS New (DD-818) and USS Corry (DD-817) visited Pireaus, the port of Athens. USS Randolph (CV-15), escorted by USS Fargo and USS Perry (DD-844) visited Greece in December 1946.

 

The U.S. Sixth Task Fleet was established in 1949, the same year the North Atlantic Treaty Organization was formed, in the early days of the Cold War.

 

The title of Naval Forces Mediterranean was changed to Commander Sixth Task Fleet and then, in 1950, Commander, Sixth Fleet” (Ref. 313E, 313EF & 313EG).

 

“In 1957, a naval exercise, Operation Deep Water, took place within the Allied Forces Southern Europe area of responsibility. It was conducted by Naval Striking and Support Forces Southern Europe (STRIKFORSOUTH), commanded by Vice Admiral Charles R. Brown, USN, who also commanded the Sixth Fleet.

 

 STRIKEFORSOUTH was effectively the NATO designation for the U.S. Sixth Fleet, though additional NATO headquarters personnel would eventually be assigned, while maintaining American control over its nuclear weapons on board U.S. aircraft carrier as mandated by the Atomic Energy Act of 1946” (Ref. 313E & 313EH).

 

“Sixth Fleet operated in support of American forces during Operation Blue Bat in Lebanon in 1958. During the Cold War, the Sixth Fleet had several confrontations with the Soviet Navy's 5th Operational Squadron, notably during the 1973 Yom Kippur War” (Ref. 313E & 313EI).

 

“During the Yom Kippur War Elmo Zumwalt describes part of the Sixth Fleet buildup as follows:

 

On 25 October JCS directed TG 20.1, Kennedy and escorts, to chop (313EA) to ComSixthFleet as TG 60.3 and proceed to join TG 60 south of Crete. Additionally, F.D. Roosevelt and escorts (TG 60.2) and TF61/62 [the amphibious task forces] were directed to join TG 60.1 south of Crete. ... TG 100.1 (Baltic destroyers) were ordered to proceed to the Mediterranean and chop to ComSixthFleet” (Ref. 313E & 313EIG):

 

“The Sixth Fleet provided military, logistical and humanitarian assistance to support NATO operations in Kosovo from the beginning of Operation Allied Force. It also participated in Operation Shining Hope and Operation Joint Guardian. In March 2011, it was involved in operations in Libya pursuant to United Nations Security Council Resolution 1973.

 

The Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean is the major operational component of Naval Forces Europe. Sixth Fleet is headquartered on the command ship USS LA SALLE (AGF 3), forward deployed to Gaeta, Italy and operating in the Mediterranean Sea. Sixth Fleet consists of approximately 40 ships, 175 aircraft and 21,000 people. The principal striking power of the Sixth Fleet resides in its aircraft carriers and the modern jet aircraft, its submarines, and its reinforced battalion of US Marines on board amphibious ships deployed in the Mediterranean. Commander, Sixth Fleet has both US national and NATO responsibilities. The Commander of the Sixth Fleet, reports to the Commander-In-Chief, U.S. Naval Forces, Europe in the U.S. chain of command and to CinCSouth when the Sixth Fleet operates as part of NATO as StrikForSouth. The CinC Naval Forces Europe, based in London, is responsible for US naval operations in the European area, and also holds the NATO position of CinC Allied Forces Southern Europe, responsible to the NATO Supreme Allied Commander Europe. The CINC Naval Forces Europe does not have administrative responsibilities for support of US naval forces in Europe, which are under the cognizance of CINC Atlantic Fleet.

 

The Sixth Fleet provided military, logistical and humanitarian assistance to support NATO operations in Kosovo during the Yugoslav wars. It also participated in the so-called Operation Allied Force, Joint Task Force Noble Anvil, Operation Shining Hope and Operation Joint Guardian.

 

The United States Sixth Fleet is operationally organized into task forces. Each task force is responsible to the Sixth Fleet Commander for specific functions related to assigned units” (Ref. 313E).

 

Task Force 60 Battle Force

 

“The Sixth Fleet is operationally organized into task forces. Each task force is responsible to the Sixth Fleet Commander for specific functions related to assigned units. When strike groups deploy to the Mediterranean from the Atlantic they 'inchop' (transfer command) from Second Fleet to Sixth Fleet” (Ref. 313E).

 

Destroyer Squadron 60

 

Destroyer Squadron 60 (DESRON SIX ZERO) was established on 19 February 2003. It was homeported in Gaeta, Italy.[14]

 

“The establishment of Destroyer Squadron Sixty provided CNE/COMSIXTHFLT with a permanently assigned destroyer squadron, increasing the Sixth Fleet's options when undertaking national and theater level tasking.

 

From November 2007 to April 2008, COMDESRON 60 (Commander, Destroyer Squadron 60's commander) served as Commander Africa Partnership Station with an international staff operating off West Africa and the Gulf of Guinea” (Ref. 313E).

 

“He also serves as Commander, Task Force 365, Task Force West and Central Africa” (Ref. 313E & 313EN).

 

Task Force 60

 

Task Force 60 is the Sixth Fleet's Battle Force. When any Carrier Strike Group enters into the Mediterranean control zone it is usually designated TF 60 and the battle group commander, a one or two-star flag officer, assumes duties as Commander Task Force 60 (CTF 60) from COMDESRON 60. The Task Force is often composed of one or more aircraft carriers, each with an accompanying complement of two to six cruisers and destroyers. On board the aircraft carrier is an Carrier air wing of 65–85 aircraft. This air wing is the primary striking arm of the Strike Group, and includes attack, fighter, anti-submarine, and reconnaissance aircraft” (Ref. 313E).

 

“During the 1986 confrontation with Libya, that led to Operation El Dorado Canyon, the Sixth Fleet's battle force was under the command of Rear Admiral David E. Jeremiah” (Ref. 313E & 313EL).

 

“Task Group 60.1 under Rear Admiral J.C. Breast was made up of the Coral Sea and her escorts, Task Group 60.2 under Jeremiah, the Saratoga and her escorts, and Task Group 60.3 under Rear Admiral Henry H. Mauz, Jr., the America and her escorts. Task Group 60.5, the Surface Action Group under Captain Robert L. Goodwin, was made up of a missile cruiser, missile destroyer, and another destroyer” (Ref. 313E).

 

“The Group may be named the South and East Africa Task Group, and holds the alternate designation of Task Force 363” (Ref. 313E & 313EN).

 

File:USN Fleets (2009).png

 

The Sixth Fleet's area of responsibility, 2009.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:USN_Fleets_%282009%29.png

 

“Any naval unit within the USEUCOM or USAFRICOM AOR may be assigned to TF 60 as required upon signal from the Commander of the Sixth Fleet.

 

Task Force 61, Amphibious Assault Force

 

Task Force 61 was the Mediterranean Amphibious Ready Group. It is composed of approximately three amphibious ships and their embarked landing craft. From these ships, United States Marine ground forces can move ashore by sea and air in amphibious assault or emergency evacuation missions. Once ashore, the ships of Task Force 61 logistically support the ground forces, until the objective of the landing has been accomplished, and the Marine Forces return to the ships.

 

As of 2011, according to official NavEur/NavAf Public Affairs sources, Task Force 61 will normally be the commander of the deployed Carrier Strike Group (CSG) and will exercise operational control of all units assigned to TF61 operating in the USEUCOM or USAFRICOM AOR.

 

Task Force 62, Landing Force (Marine Expeditionary Unit)

 

Task Force 62 is the combat-ready ground force composed of a Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) of approximately 1,900 Marines. Transported in Task Force 61 ships, the MEU is equipped with armor, artillery, and transport helicopters that enable it to conduct operations ashore, or evacuate civilians from troubled areas. This MEU is usually from II MEF on the East Coast” (Ref. 313E).

 

“As of 2011, according to official Public Affairs sources, Task Force 62 will normally be the commander of the deployed Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) and will exercise operational control of all units assigned to TF61 operating in the USEUCOM or USAFRICOM AOR” (Ref. 313E & 313EO).

 

Task Force 63 Logistics Force

 

“Task Force 63 is the Logistics Force. Task Force 63 and Military Sealift Command's Sealift Logistics Command (SEALOGEUR) are two separately named formations that actually operate as a unified one with one staff” (Ref. 313E & 313EQ).

 

“Task Force 63 is headquartered at Naples, Italy. Composed of oilers, provision ships, and repair ships, its mission is the delivery of supplies at sea, and effecting repairs to other ships and equipment of the Fleet. Commander, Task Force 63 (CTF-63) is the operational commander of all the U.S. 6th Fleet air and sea logistics. While in theater, Military Sealift Command's Naval Fleet Auxiliary Force and Special Mission ships report to CTF-63 along with cargo planes that support 6th Fleet and U.S. European Command logistics missions.

 

CTF-63 is also responsible for ordering and tracking spare parts and supplies being delivered to ships in theater. CTF-63 is the immediate operational commander of Maritime Prepositioning Ship Squadron One (MPSRON ONE) based in the Mediterranean Sea. The ships of MPSRON One are deployed year-round. This pre-positions U.S. military cargo at sea. Should a military or humanitarian crisis arise in theater, the squadron can deliver its cargo ashore, enabling a faster U.S. response.

Task Force 64 Special Operations

 

The first incarnation of Task Force 64 consisted of nuclear-powered submarines armed with long-range strategic missiles (SSBN). Until the end of the 1970s these ships were homeported in Naval Station Rota, Spain. The mission was strategic deterrence. It is extremely unlikely that any SSBNs are actually still assigned or operate with CNE/C6F in the Mediterranean.

 

Previously, CTF 64 was responsible for ballistic missile submarines assigned to the Sixth Fleet. CTF 64's administrative title, was Commander Submarine Group 8. ComSubGru 8's operational functions were accomplished through four Task Forces: CTF 64, CTF 69 (attack submarines), NATO's CTF 442, or deployed SSBNs and CTF 439, the operational title for Commander Submarines Allied Naval Forces South—the rear admiral's NATO hat. (Globalsecurity.org)

 

TF 64 then became a Special Operation force, previously headquartered by the now-disbanded Naval Special Warfare Unit 10 at Rota, Spain. NSWU 10 disbanded in 2005, and it is now unclear whether CTF 64 is operating currently. During the initial stages of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan, Task Force 64 became the administrative command structure created to interface with all non-UK/US special forces and smaller ground combat forces provided by various national governments and under American operational control. This may have been because NSWU 10 elements deployed to Afghanistan to form part of the HQ” (Ref. 313E).

 

Task Force 65

 

“Task Force 65/Destroyer Squadron SIX ZERO located in Naples, Italy. Commander, Task Force 65/Commander Destroyer Squadron SIX ZERO exercises operational and tactical control of all forward deployed surface combatants operating in the USEUCOM and USAFRICOM AORs under the direction of Naval Forces Europe/Africa. TF 65 surface combatants execute myriad operations from as far North as the Norwegian Sea and south to the Cape of Good Hope including Ballisitic Missile Defense, Sea Lines of Communication enforcement, Maritime Interdiction Operations, direct support to NATO combined and Joint operations and exercises, Counter-terrorism operations, Counter-piracy operations, Africa Maritime Law Enforcement Partnership operations, whole of government Africa Partnership Station deployments and Theater Security Cooperation activities both inport and underway.

 

It can be seen from this 2011 official description that the CDS 60 task force designator has been switched from TF 60 to TF 65.

 

Task Force 66

 

Task Force 66 will usually be the commander of the deployed Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) and will exercise operational control of all units assigned to TF66 operating in the USEUCOM or USAFRICOM AOR.

 

Task Force 68

 

Task Force 68 is the Navy Expeditionary Combat Force. Units typically assigned to TF 68 are Explosive Ordnance Disposal units, Naval Construction units and Marines which make up the Fleet Anti-Terrorism Security Teams (FAST).

 

Task Force 67 Land-Based Maritime Patrol Aircraft

 

Task Force 67 is composed of land-based maritime patrol aircraft. These aircraft operate over the waters of the Mediterranean in anti-submarine, reconnaissance, surveillance, and mining roles. In the past, Task Force 67's has been provided by Commander, Fleet Air Mediterranean (COMFLTAIRMED), but it is unclear whether FLTAIRMED still exists. The Task Force commander also previously held the role of NATO AFSOUTH's Commander, Maritime Air, Allied Naval Forces South with the NATO task force designator TF 431” (Ref. 313E).

 

“Task Force organization 1999” (Ref. 313E & 313ER):

 

TG-67.1 Maritime Surv & Recce Det Sigonella (Sicily)

TU-67.1.1 Patrol Squadron Sigonella (VP)

TG-67.2 Maritime Surv & Recce Det Rota (Spain)

TU-67.2.1 Patrol Squadron Rota (when activated; VP)

TG-67.3 Patrol Squadron, Souda Bay, (Crete)(When activated)

TG-67.4 VQ-2 (Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron Two)(Whidbey Island, WA)(EP-3)

TG-67.8 CROF Souda Bay, Crete

 

“As of 2011, officially Task Force 67's mission is to provide responsive, interoperable, and expeditionary combat ready maritime patrol aircraft and supporting forces to Commander, U.S. Naval Forces, Europe/Commander, U.S. Naval Forces, Africa and Commander, U.S. SIXTH Fleet (CNE-CNA-C6F), NATO and Unified Commanders to conduct effective Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW), maintain Maritime Domain Awareness (MDA), enhance regional stability, promote cooperative maritime safety and security, and be decisive while conducting overseas contingency operations.

 

Task Force 68, Maritime Force Protection Force

 

“Established 17 March 2005, CTF 68 is to command force protection forces such as construction battalions, mobile mine assembly units, and Fleet Anti-Terrorism Security Teams (FAST) platoons which are part of Marine Corps Security Force Company Europe (MCSFCoEUR).

 

A possibly more recent mission for CTF 68 is Commander, Task Force SIX EIGHT conducts Explosive Ordnance Disposal operations, Naval Construction, Expeditionary Security and Theater Security Cooperation in order to maintain strategic assess, develop interoperability with coalition, joint, inter-agency and other partners, and increase security and stability in Europe and Africa. On order, conduct Point and Area Defense to protect and defend critical infrastructure and High Value Assets against terrorist attack. Be prepared to conduct Non-Combatant Evacuation Operations.

 

Task Force 66/69 Submarine Warfare

 

Task Force 66/69 is responsible for planning and coordinating area submarine and anti-submarine warfare operations in the Mediterranean. Specifically, Task Force 69 is composed of attack submarines that provide capability to destroy enemy surface ships and submarines, as well as protect other Sixth Fleet ships from attack.

 

As of 2011, according to official U.S., Navy public affairs contributions to wikipedia, Task Force 69 is the Submarine Force and exercises operational control of all Submarine assets in the USEUCOM or USAFRICOM AOR” (Ref. ” (Ref. 313E).

 

Partial list of ships

 

· USS Newport News CA-148

· USS Salem CA-139

· USS Des Moines CA-134

· USS Columbus CA-74

· USS Northampton CLC-1

· USS Springfield CLG-7

· USS Little Rock CLG-4

· USS Little Rock CG-4

· USS Boston CAG-1

· USS Springfield CLG-7

· USS Albany CG-10

· USS Puget Sound AD-38

· USS Coronado AGF-11

· USS Belknap CG-26

· USS La Salle AGF-3

· USS Mount Whitney LCC/JCC-20 (Current)

 

U.S. Naval Forces Europe, U.S. Naval Forces Africa, U. S. Sixth Fleet

 

 

 

 

5th and 6th Fleet

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIER SHIP

HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619