U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY, PRESENTED BY SHIP/HULL NO. (AS CARRIERS COMMISSIONED (CC)), COMMISSIONED, RECLASSIED, REDESIGNATED, SANK, DECOMMISSIONING, STRICKEN FROM THE NAVAL REGESTER, SOLD OR DONATED

1920 to Present

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIER SHIP

HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

PRESENTED BY SHIP/HULL NO. (COMMISSIONED CARRIER (CC)), COMMISSIONED, RECLASSIED, REDESIGNATED, SANK, DECOMMISSIONING, STRICKEN FROM THE NAVAL REGESTER, SOLD OR DONATED

 

 

SHIP, HULL NO. & COMM. CARRIER

COMM

SANK

STATUS

SOLD / DONATED

Langley (AV-3), former, CV-1 & Jupiter (AC-3)                       Converted to CV-1 - 24/03/20 to 20/03/22                                                          Renamed Langley 11/04/20

07/04/13                        Recomm. 11/04/37 Redes. AV 25/10/36

*27/02/42

 

Resd. 11/04/37

27/02/42(D)

After 27/02/42(S)

N/A

Sunk as a result enemy action about 75 miles south of Tjilatjap.

fourth Lexington (CV-2), former CC 1

14/12/27

*08/5/42

08/05/42(D)

After 08/05/42(S)

N/A

Sunk as a result of enemy action at the Battle of the Coral Sea.

fifth Saratoga (CV-3)

16/11/27

+25/07/46

26/07/46(D)

15/08/46(S)

N/A

Used as a test target and sunk at Bikini Atoll.

sixth Ranger (CV-4)

04/06/33

N/A

18/10/46(D)

Philadelphia Naval Shipyard

29/10/46(S)

Sold for scrap to Sun Ship-building & Drydock

31/01/47

third Yorktown (CV-5)

30/11/37

*07/06/42

07/06/42(S)

N/A

Sunk due to enemy action at the Battle of Midway.

seventh Enterprise (CV-6)

12/05/38

N/A

18/01/46(I)

17/02/47(D/S)

Norfolk Navy Yard

01/07/58

eighth Wasp (CV-7)

25/04/40

*16/09/42

15/09/42(D)

16/09/42(S)

N/A

Sunk due to enemy action southeast of San Cristobal Island.

seventh Hornet (CV-8)

20/10/41

*27/10/42

26/10/42(D)

13/01/43(S)

N/A

Sunk due to enemy action at the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands.

seventh Essex (CVS-9), former CVA-9 & CV-9

31/12/42

N/A

03/09/45(I)

09/01/47(#)

09/01/47 to 16/01/51(R)

Bremerton Group

Recomm. 16/01/51

Redes. CVS 08/03/60

20/06/69(D)

Philadelphia Group

01/06/73(S)

Disposed of, sold by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) for scrapping

01/06/75

fourth Yorktown (CVS-10), former CVA-10, CV-10 & Bon Homme Richard

(14th CC)

Renamed 26/09/42 

15/04/43

N/A

21/06/46(#)

09/01/47(D)

09/01/47 to June 1952(R)
Bremerton Group

06/52(RA)

15/12/52(#)

Recomm. 20/02/53

21/03/55(#)

Recomm. 2nd  14/10/55

Redes. CVS 01/09/57

27/06/70(D) 2nd

Philadelphia Group

01/06/73(S)

N/A

Dedicated as a Memorial on 13/10/75

The Navy Department approved the donation of Yorktown to the Patriot's Point Development Authority, Charleston, South Carolina; formally Dedicated as a Memorial on the 200th anniversary of the Navy for a museum ship in South Carolina, formally Dedicated as a Memorial on 13 October 1975.

fourth Intrepid (CVS-11), former CVA-11 & CV-11 (19th CC)

16/08/43

N/A

15/08/46(#)

09/0147(D)

09/0147 to 09/06/52(R)

Pacific Reserve Fleet

Recomm. 09/02/52

09/04/52(D) 2nd

Norfolk Naval Shipyard

Recomm. 2nd15/10/54

Redes. CVS 08/12/61

15/03/74(D) 3rd

Philadelphia Group

Formally Dedicated as a Memorial. Donated in New York City in 08/82

Hornet (CVS-12), former CVA-12, CV-12 & Kearsarge (24th CC)

Renamed 26/11/42

29/11/43

N/A

15/01/47(D)

15/01/47 to 20/03/51(R)

San Francisco, Ca.

Recomm. 20/03/51

12/05/51(D) 2nd

Pacific Reserve Fleet

Recomm. 2nd  11/09/53

Redes. CVS 27/07/58

26/05/70(D) 3rd

Pacific Reserve Fleet

19/08/89(S)

Donated to The Aircraft Carrier Hornet Foundation for use as a museum on 26/05/98

Designated National Historic Landmark by the National Park Service 4 December 1991. Hornet was towed to Hunters Point Naval Shipyard in late 1994. Captain Jim Dodge, Commanding Officer NAS Alameda, seeks and receives approval to borrow and relocate former Hornet to NAS Alameda for five months to use for display purposes as a part of the NAS base closure historical preservation process on 11 May 1995. Moved from NAS Alameda to FISC Oakland to await salvage disposition in September 1995. During the summer of 1995, 85,000 people tour former Hornet. The Aircraft Carrier HORNET Foundation is formed to save the HORNET 23 October 1995. Moved back to NAS Alameda (pier 3) to await donation disposition 4 December 1995. Saved from the scrap heap by the efforts of historically-minded citizens and was donated to The Aircraft Carrier Hornet Foundation for use as a museum at Alameda, Calif. by the U. S. Navy 26 May 1998. Recommissioned a third time at NAS Alameda (pier 3) for use as a museum at Alameda, Calif. by the U. S. Navy 17 October 1998. Designated a California State Historic Landmark. She is listed on the National Register of Historic places, #91002065.

fifth Franklin (AVT-8), former CV-13 (25th CC)

31/01/44

N/A

11/02/47(D)

Philadelphia Group

Bayonne, New Jersey

Redes. AVT-8 15/05/59

01/10/64(S)

27/07/66 (SOLD)

27/07/66

fourth Ticonderoga (CVS-14), former CVA-14, CV-14 & Hancock (27th CC)

Renamed 01/05/43

 

08/05/44

N/A

09/01/47(D)

09/01/47 to 31/01/52(R)

Bremerton Group

Reduced Comm. 31/01/52

04/04/52(D) 2nd

Norfolk Naval Shipyard

Recomm. 2nd  11/09/54

Redes. CVS-14 21/10/69

01/09/73(D) 2nd

West Coast, San Francisco, Ca. or Bremerton Group

16/11/73(S)

01/09/75 (SOLD)

Disposed of, sold by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) for scrapping 01/09/75

Randolph (CVS-15), former CVA-15 & CV-15 (30th CC)

09/10/44

N/A

25/02/48 to 01/07/53(R)

Philadelphia Group

Recomm. 01/07/53

Redes. CVS 31/03/59

13/02/69(D)

Philadelphia Group

01/06/73(S)

Disposed of, sold by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) for scrapping 01/04/75

Lexington (AVT-16), former CVT-16, CVS-16, CVA-16, CV-16 & Cabot

(11th CC)

Renamed 16/06/42

 

17/02/43

 

N/A

23/04/47(D)

Apr. 1947 to Aug. 1955(R)

Bremerton Group

Recomm. 15/08/55

Redes. CVS-16 01/10/62

29/12/63 to 08/11/91 (NAR)

Redes. CVT-16 01/01/69

Redes. AVT-16 01/07/78

08/11/91(D) 2nd

Pensacola, Florida

30/11/91(S)

Donated  as a museum in Corpus Christi, Tex. 15/06/92

Donated USS Lexington Museum on the Bay on 15 June 1992 and now operates as such in Corpus Christi, Texas.

Bunker Hill (AVT-9), former CVS-17, CVA-17 & CV-17 (15th CC)

24/05/43

N/A

01/46(I)

Bremerton Group

09/07/47(D)

01/11/66 to 09/07/47(R)

Bremerton Group

Redes. CVS 08/08/53

Redes. AVT-9 15/05/59

01/11/66(S)

Scrapped 05/73 (SOLD)

Retained as moored electronic test ship in San Diego until Nov. 1972 until scrapped.

ninth Wasp (CVS-18), former CVA-18, CV-18 & Oriskany (23rd CC)

Renamed 13/11/42

24/11/43

N/A

17/02/47(D/R)

Atlantic Reserve Fleet

Recomm. 10/09/51

Redes. CVS 01/11/56

01/07/72(D/S)

Atlantic Reserve Fleet

21/05/73

 

Wasp served as carrier qualification duty ship for the Naval Air Training Command from 24 January to 26 February 1967 and conducted operations in the Gulf of Mexico and off the east coast of Florida. Disposed of, sold by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) for scrapping to Union Minerals and Alloys Corp., of New York City on 21 May 1973, and subsequently scrapped.

Hancock (CV-19), former CVA-19, CV-19 & fourth Ticonderoga (26th CC)

Renamed 01/05/43

 

15/04/44

Reclass. CV – Multi-Purpose Aircraft Carrier 30/06/75

 

N/A

29/04/46(I/D)

29/04/46 to 15/02/54(R)

Seattle, Wa.

Recomm. 15/02/54

13/04/56(D) 2nd

San Diego, Ca. or Puget Sound Naval Shipyard

Recomm. 2nd  15/11/56

31/01/76(D/S) 3rd

Pacific Reserve Fleet

Disposed of, sold by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) for scrapping

01/09/76

 

Bennington (CVS-20), former CVA-20), CV-20 (28th CC)

06/08/44

N/A

08/11/46(D)

08/11/46 to 13/11/52(R)

Norfolk, Virginia

Recomm. 13/11/52

Redes. CVS 30/06/59

15/01/70(D)

Pacific Reserve Fleet

20/09/89(S)

Disposed of, sold by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) for scrapping 01/12/94

Across the Pacific for scrapping in India.

fifth Boxer (LPH-4), former CVS-21, CVA-21 & CV-21 (33rd CC)

16/04/45

N/A

Redes. CVS 01/02/56

Redes. LPH-4 30/01/59

01/12/69(D/S)

Pacific Fleet Reserve

Disposed of, sold by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) for scrapping 13/03/71

fourth Independence (CVL-22), former CV-22 & light cruiser Amsterdam, CL-59 (10th CC)

14/01/43

Reclas. CVL-22 15/07/43

=01 & 25 07/46

29/01/51 Sunk as target

28/08/46(D)

27/02/51(S)

N/A

Sunk as target

Highly radioactive hulk of USS Independence (CVL-22) was assigned as a target vessel for the Bikini atomic bomb tests, she was placed within one-half mile of ground zero for the 1 July explosion. The veteran ship did not sink, however, and after taking part in another explosion 25 July was taken to Kwajalein and decommissioned 28 August 1946. The highly radioactive hulk was later taken to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii and San Francisco, Calif. for further test after her final atomic bomb tests during Operation Crossroads at Kwajalein and was finally sunk in weapons tests off the coast of California 29 January 1951.

fourth Princeton (CVL-23), former CV-23 & Tallahassee (CL-61) (12th CC)

Renamed 31/03/42

02/06/41

Redes. CV-23

24/10/44

25/02/43

Redes. CVL-23 15/07/43

24/10/44(D)

After 24/10/44(S)

Sunk due to enemy action in the Sibuyan Sea.

Belleau Wood (CVL-24) former CV & New Haven (CL-76) (13th CC)

Redes. CV-24 16/02/42

Renamed 16/02/42

31/03/43

Reclas. CVL-24 15/07/43

N/A

13/01/47(D)

Alameda Naval Air Station

Lend Lease to France 05/11/53

Returned from France in 1960

01/10/60(S)

Sold for scrapping

01/10/60

Cowpens (AVT-1), former CVL-25 & CV-25 (16th CC)

28/05/43

Reclas.

CVL-25

15/07/43

 

N/A

03/12/46(#)

13/01/47(D)

Mare Island, Ca.

Redes. AVT-1 in May 1959

01/11/59(S)

Sold for scrapping

01/11/59

Monterey (AVT 2), former CVL-26, CV-26 & Dayton (CL-78) (17th CC)

Redes. CV-26 27/03/42

Renamed 31/03/42

17/06/43

Reclas.

CVL-26 15/07/43

N/A

11/02/47(D)

Philadelphia Group

Recomm. 15/09/50

15/09/50 to 16/01/56 (NAR)

16/01/56(D)

Philadelphia Group

Redes. AVT 2 15/05/59

01/06/70(S)

Sold for scrapping

05/71

second Langley (CVL-27), former CV-27, Fargo (CL-85) & Crown Point (CV-27)

(20h CC)

Renamed 13/10/42

31/08/43

Reclas.

CVL-27 15/07/43

N/A

31/05/46(I)

11/02/47(D)

Philadelphia Group

01/08/51 Lend Lease to France 20/03/63(S)

Sold for scrapping

19/02/64

second Cabot (AVT-3), former CVL-28, CV-28 &Wilmington (CL-79) (18th CC)

Renamed Dedalo 23/06/42

24/07/43

Redes.

CVL-28 15/07/43

 

N/A

11/02/47(D)

11/02/47 to 27/10/48(R)

Philadelphia Group

Recomm. 27/10/48

27/10/48 to 21/01/55 (NAR)

21/01/55(D/R) 2nd

Philadelphia Group

Redes. AVT-3 15/05/59

Sold to Spain in 1972

Lend Lease to Spain 1967 to 1972. In 1967, after over twelve years in "mothballs", Cabot was loaned to Spain, in whose navy she served as Dedalo. The loan was converted to a sale in 1972. Dedalo was stricken by the Spanish Navy in August 1989 and given to a private organization in the U.S. for use as a museum ship. However, that private organization was unable to pay its creditors, so, on 10 September 1999, the ship was auctioned off by the U.S. Marshal's Service to Sabe Marine Salvage.

Bataan (CVL-29), former CV-29 & Buffalo (CL-99) (22nd CC)

Renamed & Redes. CV-29 02/06/42

17/11/43

Reclas.

CVL-29 15/07/43

N/A

10/01/46(I)

11/02/47(D)

11/02/47 to 13/05/50(R)

Philadelphia Group

Recomm. 13/05/50

26/08/53(I)

09/04/54(D) 2nd

San Francisco, Ca.

Pacific Reserve Fleet

01/09/59(S)

Sold for scrapping

05/61

second San Jacinto (AVT-5), former CVL-30, CV-30, Reprisal & light cruiser Newark  (CL-100) (21st CC)

15/10/43

N/A

01/03/47(D) at San Diego, Calif.

Redes. AVT-5 15/05/59

01/06/70(S)

Sold for scrapping to National Metal and Steel Co., Terminal Island, Calif.

15/12/71

Renamed Reprisal 02 /06/42. Renamed San Jacinto on 30/01/43, converted, while building, to a light aircraft carrier and reclassified as CVL-30.

second Bon Homme Richard (CV-31), former CVA-31 & CV-31 (31st CC)

26/11/44

Reclass. CV – Multi-Purpose Aircraft Carrier 30/06/75

 

N/A

09/01/47(D)

09/01/47 to 15/01/51(R) inactive at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard from 16 January 1946 until decomm. at Seattle, Washington

Recomm. 15/01/51

15/05/53(D) 2nd

San Francisco Ca.

Recomm. 2nd  06/09/55

02/07/71(D) 3rd

Bremerton Group

1989(S)

Sold for scrapping 04/02/92

Disposed of, sold by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) to the Union Minerals & Alloys Corp. for scrapping.

third Leyte (AVT-10), former CVS-32, CVA-32, CV-32 & Crown Point (40th CC)

11/04/46

N/A

Redes. CVS 08/08/53

Redes. AVT-10 15/05/59

15/05/59(D)

Philadelphia Group

01/06/69(S)

Sold for scrapping 09/70

Disposed of, sold by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) to the Union Minerals & Alloys Corp. for scrapping.

third Kearsarge (CVS-33), former CVA-33 & CV-33 (39th CC)

02/03/46

N/A

16/06/50(D)

Bremerton Group

Recomm. 15/02/52

Redes. CVS 01/10/58

15/01/70(D) 2nd

Bremerton Group

01/05/73(S)

Disposed of, sold by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) for scrapping 01/03/74

Oriskany (CV-34) former CVA-34 & CV-34 (46th CC)

25/09/50

Multi-Purpose Aircraft Carrier 30/06/75

17/05/06

02/01/57(D)

San Francisco. Ca.

Recomm. 07/03/59

30/09/79(D) 2nd

30/09/79 to 25/07/89(R)

25/07/89(S)

Sold for scrapping several times

Sold for scrapping 26/01/93; scrapper defaulted and ship was repossessed without having left Navy custody. Resold for scrapping 09/09/95, towed to San Francisco 01/05/96, but defaulted. Subsequently moved to Mare Island for scrapping, but scrap contract revoked 1 July 1997. Repossessed by the Navy and contract terminated 30 July 1997. Towed to Beaumont Reserve Fleet in Beaumont, Texas for storage, April 1999. Repossessed by the U. S. Navy when the contractor defaulted the contract 30/07/98. Donated and transferred to the State of Florida December 2004 when she was towed to Pensacola, Fla., for preparation to be sunk as an artificial reef. Oriskany was sunk 24 miles off the coast of Pensacola, Fla., on 17 May 2006. The 888-foot ship took about 37 minutes to sink below the surface.

The Second Reprisal (CV-35) of the United States Navy would have been a Ticonderoga-class fleet carrier. Her keel was laid down on July 1, 1944, at the New York Naval Shipyard, of New York, New York. On August 12, 1945, when Reprisal was about half complete, construction was cancelled.  In 1946, the hulk was launched without ceremony to clear the slipway, and was used in Chesapeake Bay for various experiments, culminating on April 1, 1948, in explosives tests. Although inspected during January 1949 with a view to completing her as an attack carrier, the plan was dropped and Reprisal was sold on August 2, 1949, to the Boston Metals Corporation of Baltimore, Maryland, and, in November 1949, broken up. Despite this fact, Reprisal appeared as if in service in 1997 on the television show JAG. Her part was played by USS Forrestal (CV-59).

Antietam (CVS-36), former CVA-36 & CV-36 (32nd CC)

28/01/45

N/A

Early 1949(D)

Early in 1949 – 06/12/50(R) Alameda, Ca.

06/12/50(RA)

Recomm. 17/01/51

April 1952(I)

Pacific Reserve Fleet

Summer 52(RA) - June 1952

Sep. to Dec. 1952

New York Naval Shipyard

Redes. CVS 01/08/53

21/04/57 to 23/10/62 (NAR)

07/01/63 to 01/05/73(#)

Philadelphia Group

01/05/73(S)

Disposed of, sold by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) for scrapping 01/12/73 - to the Union Minerals & Alloys Corp. for scrapping

fifth Princeton (LPH-5), former CVS-37, CVA-37, CV-37 & Valley Forge

(37th CC)

Redes. CV-23 16/02/42

Renamed 31/03/42 (36th CC)

18/11/45

N/A

20/06/48(D)

Pacific Reserve Fleet

Recomm. 28/08/50

Redes. CVS 01/01/54

Redes. LPH 02/03/59

30/01/70(D/S) 2nd

Pacific Reserve Fleet

Sold for scrapping in May 1971

Sold for scrapping  05/71

Shangri-la (CVS-38), former CVA-38 & CV-38 (29th CC)

15/09/44

N/A

07/11/47(D)

07/11/47 to 10/05/51(R)

San Francisco Ca.

Recomm. 10/05/51

14/11/52(D) 2nd

San Francisco, Ca.

Recomm. 2nd  10/01/55

Redes. CVS-38 30/06/69

17/12/70(I)

30/07/71(D) 3rd

Philadelphia Group

15/07/82(S)

Disposed of by Maritime Administration - MARAD exchange

09/08/88

second Lake Champlain (CVS-39), former CVA-39 & CV-39 (34th CC)

03/06/45

N/A

17/02/47(D)

1947 to 1950(R)

"Mothball Fleet"

at Norfolk, Va.

08/50(RA)

Recomm. 19/09/52

Redes. CVS 01/08/57

02/05/66(D) 2nd

Philadelphia Group

01/12/69(S)

Disposed of, sold by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) for scrapping 28/04/72

Tarawa (AVT-12), former CVS-40, CVA-40 & CV-40 (38th CC)

08/12/45

N/A

30/06/49(D)

30/06/49 to 30/11/50(R/A) 

New York Atlantic Reserve Fleet

30/11/50(RA)

Recomm. 03/02/51

Redes. CVS 10/01/55

13/05/60(D) 2nd

Philadelphia Group

Redes. AVT-12 in 05/61

01/06/67(S)

30/10/68

Midway (CV-41), former CVA-41 & CVB-41 (35th CC)

10/09/45

Reclass. CV – Multi-Purpose Aircraft Carrier 30/06/75

 

N/A

07/55(D)

Puget Sound Naval Ship Yard

Recomm. 30/09/57

15/02/66(/#) 2nd

Pacific Fleet Reserve, in commission special

San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard

Recomm. 2nd  31/01/70

11/04/92(D) 3rd

North Island Naval Air Station

Navy Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility, Bremerton, Wash.

17/03/97(S)

Donated 12/09/03

Towed to San Diego  to be used as a museum and memorial

05/01/04

Decommissioned at North Island Naval Air Station, San Diego, California on 11 April 1992 upon arrival from Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, once she was relieved by USS Independence (CV-62) which replaced Midway as the forward-deployed carrier in Yokosuka, Japan in August 1991. Donated 12 September 2003 and began her journey from the Navy Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility, Bremerton, Washington, to San Diego, California via Oakland, Calif., in preparation for use as a museum and memorial. Towed to the Broadway Pier in San Diego where she will be part of a major museum ship devoted to carriers and naval aviation 10 January 2004.

Franklin D. Roosevelt (CV-42), former CVA-42, CVB-42 & Coral Sea (CVB-42)

(36th CC)

27/10/45

Reclass. CV – Multi-Purpose Aircraft Carrier 30/06/75

 

N/A

23/04/54(D)

Puget Sound Naval Ship Yard

Recomm. 26/04/56

30/09/77(D/S) 2nd at

East Coast

Disposed of, sold by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) for scrapping 01/04/78

Coral Sea CV-43, former CVA-43, CVB-43 & CV-42 (45th CC)

Contract Awarded 14/06/43 NAMED Coral Sea 10/10/44 - Reclass. 15/07/43 CVB (42nd CC)

01/10/47

Reclass. CV – Multi-Purpose Aircraft Carrier 30/06/75

 

N/A

24/05/57(D)

Bremerton Group

Recomm.25/01/60

26/04/90(D) 2nd

Bremerton Group

30/04/90(S)

Disposed of, sold by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) for scrapping 07/05/93

Coral Sea completed as last 80' section is pulled ashore 9 August 2000. Sold for scraping by the Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) to Seawitch Marine Salavage Fairfield Tm., Baltimore, Md. 6 July 1993 after Museum plan failed Sale Bid # 31-3359 dated 4 March 1993, appraised $300K.

CV 44 - cancelled January 11, 1943

Valley Forge (LPH-8), former CVS-45, CVA-45 & CV-45 (43rd CC)

03/11/46

N/A

Redes. CVS 01/01/54

Redes. LPH-8 01/07/61

15/01/70(D/S)

Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility at San Diego, Ca.

Sold for scrap to Nicolai Joffre Corp., Beverly Hills, Calif.

29/10/71

Iwo Jima (CV-46), a Ticonderoga-class aircraft carrier, was under construction by Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Newport News, Va., but was cancelled 12 August 1945. Her partially completed hull was scrapped.

Philippine Sea (AVT-11), former CVS-47, CVA-47 & CV-47 (41st CC)

11/05/46

N/A

Redes. CVS 15/11/55

15/07/58(I)

28/12/58(D)

Long Beach, Ca.

Redes. AVT-11 15/05/59

01/12/69(S)

03/71

Arlington (AGMR-2), former Saipan, AGMR-2, CC-3, AVT-6 & CVL-48

(42nd CC)

Name changed to Arlington 8 Apr 1965 and served as an communications relay ship until decomm. (45th CC)

14/07/46

N/A

1946 to 1948 (NAR)

1955 (NAR)

30/09/57(D)

Bayonne, N.J.

Redes. AVT-6 15/05/59

Redes.CC-3 03/63

Redes. AGMR-2 01/09/64

Renamed Arlington

08/04/65

Recomm. 27/08/66

25/08/69(I)

14/01/70(D) 2nd

San Diego, Ca.

15/08/75(S)

Disposed of, sold by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) for scrapping 06/06/76

second Wright (CC-2), former AVT-7 & CVL-49 (44th CC)

Converted to and commissioned 11 May 1963 as a command ship (46th CC)

09/02/47

N/A

31/03/47 to 26/01/49 (NAR)

15/03/56(D)

Bremerton Group

Redes. AVT-7 15/05/59

Redes. CC-2 15/03/62

Recomm. 11/05/63

27/05/70(D) 2nd

Philadelphia Group Philadelphia Naval Shipyard

01/12/77(S)

Disposed of, sold by Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) for scrapping 01/08/80

CV-50 - Bethlehem Steel Company

CVs 51 & 52 - New York Navy Yard

CV-53 - Philadelphia Navy Yard

CVs 54 & 55 - Norfolk Navy Yard

CVB-56 - cancelled March 28, 1945

CVB-57 - cancelled March 28, 1945

-USS United States (CVA-58), the third ship of the US Navy named for its nation, was to be the lead ship of a radical new design of aircraft carrier. On 29 July 1948 President of the United States, Harry Truman approved construction of five "supercarriers", for which funds had been provided in the Naval Appropriations Act of 1949. The keel of the first of those five postwar carriers was laid down on 18 April 1949 at Newport News Shipbuilding.  The flush-deck United States was designed to launch and recover the 100,000 pound (45 t) aircraft required to carry early-model nuclear weapons, which weighed as much as five tons. The ship would have no island and be equipped with four aircraft elevators and four catapults. The construction cost of the new ship alone was estimated at US$190 million. The additional thirty-nine ships required to complete the accompanying task force raised the total cost to US$1.265 billion. United States was also designed to provide air support for forces and to conduct sea control operations, but her primary mission was long-range nuclear bombardment. That mission put her in harm's way long before construction began. The United States Air Force viewed United States as a challenge to their monopoly on strategic nuclear weapons delivery. Swayed by limited funds and bitter opposition from the United States Army and Air Force, Secretary of Defense Louis A. Johnson announced on 23 April 1949 -- five days after the ship's keel was laid down -- the cancellation of construction of United States. Secretary of the Navy John Sullivan immediately resigned, and the subsequent "Revolt of the Admirals" cost Admiral Louis Denfeld his position as Chief of Naval Operations, but atomic bombs went to sea on the aircraft carrier USS Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1950.

Forrestal (AVT-59), former CV-59 & CVA-59 (47th CC)

01/10/55

Reclass. CV – Multi-Purpose Aircraft Carrier 30/06/75

N/A

Redes. AVT-59 04/02/92

11/09/93(D/S)

Philadelphia Group

Disposed of and Sold 15/12/15

Donation hold as a museum ship and memorial at the Naval Station, Newport, Rhode Island 14 September 1998. Under consideration for Artificial Reefing as of 13 December 2005. AVT 59 HAS BEEN SCRAPPED BY ALL STAR METALS LLC ON DECEMBER 15, 2015. CERTIFICAT E OF SCRAPPING, DEMILITARIZATION AND HAZMAT DISPOSAL IS ON FILE.

Saratoga (CV-60), former CVA-60 & CVB-60 (48th CC)

14/04/56

Reclass. CV – Multi-Purpose Aircraft Carrier 30/06/75

N/A

20//08/94(D)

30/09/94(S) at Naval Station, Mayport, Florida

Disposed of and Sold 21/08/14

The Saratoga was decommissioned at the Naval Station, Mayport, Florida, and stricken from the Naval Vessel Registry (Navy List) on 20 August 1994, with Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mike Boorda the keynote speaker at the decommissioning, having offloaded material and closing out each of the ship's more than 3,500 spaces, the crew prepared to deactivate the ship, upon arrival early in the morning of 24 June 1994. Saratoga was towed out of the Naval Station Mayport basin on 22 May 1995, to the Naval Station Newport, Rhode Island. She was towed from the Naval Station Newport, Rhode Island on 3 August 1998 to Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, then, deactivated at the Philadelphia Navy Yard in August 1998. Saratoga remained at the Naval Education and Training Center from her arrival 7 August 1998 until she returned to donation hold on 19 January 2000 when the Secretary of the Navy placed Saratoga in donation status, thus making her eligible to become a museum and memorial, transferring to the Naval Station, Newport, R.I. where she remained until sold around 8 May 2014, in this status having had her status changed to "disposal as an experimental ship. While a hulk at Newport, ex-Saratoga, like her sisters, has been extensively stripped to support the active carrier fleet. There was an active effort to make her a museum ship in Quonset Point in North Kingstown, Rhode Island. In April 2010 Saratoga was removed from donation hold and scheduled to be disposed” (Ref. S-[2]). Stricken, to be disposed of 30 September 1994. Donation Hold stands firm as of 2 May 2005 to 2009 - USS Saratoga Museum Foundation, Inc. On 8 May 2014, Naval Sea Systems Command announced that ESCO Marine, Brownsville, Texas, will scrap Saratoga for one cent. This was the minimum amount that could be paid for scrapping the ship” (Ref. S-[26] & S-[27] ). On 21 August 2014, Saratoga departed Naval Station Newport and made its way down Narragansett Bay to the Atlantic Ocean, en route to the ESCO MARINE INC IN BROWNSVILLE, TX., ship recycling plant in Brownsville, Texas. The vessel arrived at the scrapyard on 16 September for final scrapping.”

seventh Ranger (CV-61), former CVA-61

(49th CC)

10/08/57

Reclass. CV – Multi-Purpose Aircraft Carrier 30/06/75

 

N/A

10/07/93(D) at PSNS & Intermediate Maintenance Facility in Bremerton, Wash.

03/08/04(S) In inactive reserve in the Naval Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility (NISMF), Bremerton, Wash. from 1993 to 2004

Disposed of and Sold

22/12/14

“A new NAVSEA Instruction dated June 2, 2009, changes the application process. Under the new process there was a notice published in the Federal Register concerning the availability of ex-RANGER for donation under the new rules - 60 days from publication date to submit a Phase One application? An effort to establish USS Ranger (CV-61), former CVA-61 (49th CC) as a museum ship began in 2004 - USS Ranger Foundation, Portland. Oregon. An effort was underway to establish the seventh Ranger (CV-61), former CVA-61 as a museum ship from 2004 to 2008. Sits at the Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania awaiting sale to be scrapped. Arrived from the Beaumont Reserve Fleet in Beaumont, Texas after her transfer from civilian authority. Repossessed by the U. S. Navy when the contractor defaulted the contract (terminated 30 July 1997) and transferred to the Beaumont Reserve Fleet in Beaumont, Texas, to be scrapped. When asked by the Long Beach Press-Telegram, NAVSEA stated that Ranger was no longer available for donation and was slated to be scrapped in 2015” (Ref. R-[26]). On 22 December 2014, the U.S. Navy paid one cent to International Shipbreaking of Brownsville, Texas, to tow and scrap Ranger. International Shipbreaking will pay to tow her around South America, through the Straits of Magellan, as Ranger is too big to fit through the Panama Canal. The tow began on 5 March 2015, and tool up to 5 months from the inactive ships maintenance facility, Bremerton, Washington, to Brownsville. International Shipbreaking is expecting to make a profit from Ranger after the costs of the tow and the actual dismantling of the ship” (Ref. R- [27]). On April 7, 2015, ex-Ranger was seen anchored about 3 miles offshore at Panama City, Panama. On July 12, 2015, the Ranger arrived at her final resting place in Brownsville” (Ref. R-[28]).

Independence (CV-62), former CVA-62

(50th CC)

10 Jan 1959

Reclass. CV – Multi-Purpose Aircraft Carrier 28/02/73

N/A

30/09/98(D) at PSNS & Intermediate Maintenance Facility in Bremerton, Wash.

1998 to 2004 In inactive reserve in the Naval Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility (NISMF), Bremerton, Wash. 1998 to 2004

08/03/04(S)

Disposed of and Sold

2016

 “In inactive reserve in the Naval Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility (NISMF), Bremerton, Wash. 1998 to 2004. Capt. Mark R. Milliken commanding while Independence commissioning pennant was hauled down 39 years, 9 months and 20 days after it was first proudly hoisted, and the “Don’t Tread on Me” jack was transferred to the Navy’s next oldest active ship, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63). After decommissioning, Independence remained in mothballs for five and a half years before being struck on 8 March 2004. During her time in mothballs, the ship was said to have been heavily stripped to support the active carrier fleet, especially the remaining Kitty Hawk-class aircraft carriers. Her port anchor and both anchor chains were used on the new Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush. The recycling of parts and the poor material condition of the ship at the time she was withdrawn made a strong argument against retaining her as a potential museum ship. In April 2004, Navy officials identified Independence as one of 24 decommissioned ships available to be sunk as artificial reefs. However, as of February 2008, she was scheduled to be dismantled in the next five years along with USS Constellation” (Ref. I-[16]). At that time, she was still available for donation as a reef while awaiting a contract for her dismantling to be awarded” (Ref. I-[17]). On 26 January 2012, the Navy's Naval Sea Systems Command posted a notice of solicitation for the towing and complete dismantlement of multiple CV-59/CV-63 Class Aircraft Carriers in the United States, to include ex-Forrestal (CV-59), ex-Independence (CV-62), and ex-Constellation (CV-64)” (Ref. I-[18]). The ex-Independence (CV-62) is scheduled to be towed to Brownsville, TX for scrapping later in 2016, following the ex-USS Ranger (CV-61) and ex-Constellation (CV-64) (Ref. I-[19])

“After the turnover with George Washington, Kitty Hawk arrived at Bremerton, Washington in September and was informally retired on 31 January 2009 and decommissioned on 12 May 2009 at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility in Bremerton, Wash., after more than 48 years of service” (Ref. KK-[31] & KK-[32]). Kitty Hawk, the USN's last oil-powered aircraft carrier, was finally decommissioned on 12 May 2009” (Ref. KK-[33]). A group based in Wilmington, North Carolina is lobbying to bring the ship to the city after her obligatory time in the Navy Inactive Ships Program in order to serve as a floating museum alongside the battleship North Carolina” (Ref. KK-[34], KK-[35] & KK-[36]). The Navy will maintain Kitty Hawk in reserve until 2016, when the Gerald R. Ford is commissioned” (Ref. KK-[37] & KK-[38]). In January 2013, a group from Pensacola, Florida, which had originally wanted to obtain Forrestal, shifted its efforts to Kitty Hawk, due to that ship's superior condition” (Ref. KK-[39]).

Constellation (CV-64), former CVA-64

(52nd CC)

27 Oct 1961

Reclass. CV – Multi-Purpose Aircraft Carrier 01/07/75

N/A

07/08/03(D) at the Naval Air Station North Island in San Diego, Ca.

Towed 12/09/03, to be placed in inactive reserve in the Naval Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility (NISMF), Bremerton, Wash. Reserve Category X

16/01/15

Disposed of and Sold

in 2014

Constellation was towed to the ghost fleet at the Naval Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility, Bremerton, Washington, by a contracted ocean-going tug operated by Foss Maritime of Seattle, Wash. and became a member of the "mothball fleet" based at Bremerton, Washington (replaced by USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76)Ronnieon 12 September 2003, to be placed in inactive reserve after 41 years of commissioned service. On 2 December 2003, the ship was stricken (formally removed from the Naval Vessel Register) when Admiral Vern Clark decided against expenditure of maintenance costs. According to news reports in February of 2008, Constellation was scheduled to be disposed of by dismantling in the next five years, along with USS Independence” (Ref. 15]). The Constellation will be scrapped at Brownsville, Texas in early 2018” (Ref. [17]). She was towed around Cape Horn on her final voyage” (Ref. [18]). Constellation arrived at its final resting place in Brownsville on 16 January 2015” (Ref. [20]).

Enterprise (CVN-65), former CVA(N)-65 (53rd CC)

25/11/61

Reclass. CV – Multi-Purpose Aircraft Carrier 30/06/75

N/A

01/12/12(I) at PSNS & Intermediate Maintenance Facility in Bremerton, Wash.

N/A

In inactive reserve in the Naval Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility (NISMF), Bremerton, Wash.

2012 to 2016

The ship will be defueled and stripped down in Newport News, and eventually towed to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility in Bremerton, Wash.

 

Enterprise, Nimitz-Class Carriers Won't Be Museums

 

“The USS Enterprise (CVN-65) will inactivate on December 1, 2012, after 51 years of legendary service. A group of Navy veterans want to preserve the USS Enterprise's history, but it appears they'll be doing it without the ship itself. The veterans learned in March that making a museum out of the aircraft carrier, the largest in the U.S. fleet and the first to be powered by nuclear reactors isn't an option. More recently they learned that a more modest effort to preserve the ship's island also wouldn't fly. And for the 10 Nimitz-class carriers in the 11-ship U.S. fleet, a future as a museum seems unlikely.

 

Navy's Next Ford-Class Aircraft Carrier to be Named Enterprise

 

“Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced today via video message at the USS Enterprise (CVN-65) inactivation ceremony that the third Gerald R. Ford-class aircraft carrier will be named Enterprise.

 

Mabus selected this name to honor USS Enterprise (CVN-65), the Navy's first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, which was inactivated today in Norfolk, Va. Commissioned in 1961, CVN 65 served for more than five decades. It participated in the blockade of the Cuban Missile Crisis, launched strike operations in Vietnam, and conducted combat missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.

 

"The USS Enterprise was the first of its kind, and for 51 years its name has been synonymous with boldness, readiness and an adventurous spirit," said Mabus. "Rarely has our fleet been without a ship bearing the name. I chose to maintain this tradition not solely because of the legacy it invokes, but because the remarkable work of the name Enterprise is not done."

America (CV-66), former CVA-66

(54th CC)

23/01/65

Reclass. CV – Multi-Purpose Aircraft Carrier 27/09/75

 

14/05/05

Philadelphia Group

Ready Reserve Fleet

Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility (NISMF), Philadelphia, Penn. 1997 to 2003

N/A

Sunk in the Atlantic Ocean off the Virginia coast

14/05/05

Sit at the Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania awaiting sale to be scrapped until Sank. Sunk in the Atlantic Ocean off the Virginia coast on 14 May 2005, following a series of tests consisting of simulated attacks on the ship.

 

NBC Nightly News (4/15/05) Demise of USS America CV-66

“According to the December 4, 2006 issue of the Navy Times; ex-America was in one piece and sitting on its keel, some 476 miles east of Charleston, SC, and about 400 miles west of Bermuda, and 16,860 feet (5,139 meters) below the surface. This information was obtained by the USS America Carrier Veterans Association on 30 October 2000, through a Freedom of Information Act request (Ref. 324). “The event occurred at the following location, roughly between the outer banks and Bermuda: 33.09.09 N, 071.39.07 W - Depth = 2810 Fathoms (16,860 Feet).

John F. Kennedy (CV-67), former CVA-67 (55th CC)

27/05/67

Reclass. CV – Multi-Purpose Aircraft Carrier 01/12/74

 

N/A

23/03/07(D) in Mayport, Florida

Moved to Naval Station Norfolk, Va.

31/07/07 to 17/03/07

Formal  30/09/07(D)

Arrived at the Naval Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility in Philadelphia

22/03/08

N/A

John F. Kennedy decommissioned in Mayport, Florida on 23 March 2007 and was towed from NS Mayport, Fla., and taken to NS Norfolk, instead of a mothball berth at the old Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, as originally planned. The trip took about five days. On 31 July 2007, John F. Kennedy arrived at Naval Station Norfolk, Va. She remained in Norfolk until a shoaled area near Pier 4 in Philadelphia could be dredged to enable the ship to safely dock. On 17 March 2008 at about 1700, she was seen leaving Norfolk Naval Station under tow of the tug Atlantic Salvor. On 22 March 2008 Kennedy arrived, with the afternoon high tide, at the Naval Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility in Philadelphia” (Ref. JFK-[21]). She is currently laid up in the Philadelphia reserve fleet” (Ref. JFK-[22]). In November 2009, the Navy placed Kennedy on donation hold for use as a museum and memorial” (Ref. JFK-[23]). Current plans as of September 2014 have the Rhode Island Aviation Hall of Fame working to secure Pier 2 of the Naval Station Newport. These developments come after the former USS Saratoga (CV-60) was sold for scrapping earlier in the year after years of being moored in Newport” (Ref. JFK-[29] & JFK-[30]).

Nimitz (CVN-68), former CVA(N)-68  (56th CC)

03/05/75

Reclass. CV – Multi-Purpose Aircraft 30/06/75

N/A

N/A

 

Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69), former CVA(N)-69  (57th CC)

18/10/77

Reclass. CV – Multi-Purpose Aircraft 30/06/75

N/A

N/A

 

Carl Vinson (CVN-70) (58th CC)

13/03/82

N/A

N/A

 

Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) (59th CC) (Named 30/11/81)

25/10/86

N/A

N/A

 

Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) (60th CC)

11/11/89

N/A

N/A

 

George Washington (CVN-73) (61st CC)

04/07/92

N/A

N/A

 

John C. Stennis (CVN-74) (62nd CC)

09/12/95

N/A

N/A

 

Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) (63rd CC)

25/07/98

N/A

N/A

 

Ronald Reagan CVN-76 (64th CC)

12/07/03

N/A

N/A

 

George H. W. Bush (CVN-77) (65th CC)

01/10/09

N/A

N/A

 

Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78) (66th CC)

 

N/A

1st Ship Ford class

 

The Gerald R. Ford-class aircraft carrier will be 1,092 feet in length and have a beam of 134 feet. The flight deck will be 256 feet wide, and the ship will be able to operate at speeds in excess of 34 knots. Enterprise will be built by Huntington Ingalls Industries-Newport News Shipbuilding in Newport News, Va. The Navy awarded Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding a $5.1 billion contract to begin construction of the Gerald R. Ford on 10 September 2008. The keel laying and authentication ceremony for Gerald R. Ford was held at Northrop Grumman Corp.'s Newport News shipyard on 14 November 2009. Gerald R. Ford launched, holding a Christening ceremony at Huntington Ingalls Newport News Shipbuilding in Newport News on 9 November 2013. Gerald R. Ford launched and transit to Newport News Shipyard pier 3 for final stages of construction and testing on 17 November 2016. On 12 May 2005, Gerald R. Ford completed 22 no-load tests of Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS). The second quarter of FY2016,

http://www.ussgeraldrfordcommissioning.org/about-the-ship

http://www.ussgeraldrfordcommissioning.orgm

 

Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78) is slated to complete Initial Operational Test & Evaluation before entering service in 2017. Departed Huntington Ingalls Industries – Newport News Shipbuilders on 8 April 2017.Builders Sea Trials, off the coast of North Carolina from 8 to 9 April 2017.

Second John F. Kennedy

(CVN-80) (67th CC)

 

N/A

2nd Ship Ford class

 

On 15 Jan. 2009, Northrop Grumman Newport News shipyard received a $374 million cost type contract award for construction preparation of the CVN-79. FY2012, the full scale construction contract is expected to begin FY2018, planned to join the fleet. Northrop Grumman Newport News Shipyard received a $374 million cost type contract award for construction preparation of the CVN-79 on 15 January 2009. “First Cut of Steel” ceremony at Northrop Grumman Newport News Shipyard on 25 February 2017. Proposed budget being considered by Congress would change that date to September 2022 on 20 March 2012. $4 billion construction contract could be delayed a year. Instead, the Navy will pay an additional m$296 million to extend a 2010 advanced construction contract announced on 13 September 2013.

 

FY 2013: Full scale  construction to begin / FY 2018: Launched / FY 2022: Commissioned

Ninth Enterprise (CVN-79) (68th CC)

 

N/A

3rd Ship Ford class

 

The future USS Enterprise, designated CVN-80, will be the ninth ship to bear the name. USS Enterprise and subsequent Gerald R. Ford-class aircraft carriers will provide improved warfighting capability, quality of life improvements for Sailors and reduced life cycle costs” (Ref. 11-SH).

 

FY 2018: Laid Down / FY 2023: Launched / FY 2025: Commissioned / FY 2027: replace USS Nimitz (CVN-68).

* - SANK due to enemy action during WW II

+ - SANK during Operation Crossroads

I – Inactivated / RA - Reactivated / Recomm. - Recommissioned / Redesignated - Redes.

D – Decommissioned or Placed out of Commission / R – Out of Commission in Reserve

# - In Commission in Reserve / NAR – Assigned to the Naval Air Reserve training program

S - Stricken from the Naval Vessel Register (Navy List)

=Highly radioactive hulk of USS Independence (CVL-22) was assigned as a target vessel for the Bikini atomic bomb tests, she was placed within one-half mile of ground zero for the 1 July explosion. The veteran ship did not sink, however, and after taking part in another explosion 25 July was taken to Kwajalein and decommissioned 28 August 1946. The highly radioactive hulk was later taken to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii and San Francisco, Calif. for further test after her final atomic bomb tests during Operation Crossroads at Kwajalein and was finally sunk in weapons tests off the coast of California 29 January 1951.

Atlantic Reserve Fleet = Philadelphia Group at Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Norfolk, Virginia and Bayonne, New Jersey.

Pacific Reserve Fleet = Alameda Naval Air Station, Seattle, Washington, Mare Island and Bremerton Group at Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington.

CV-22, CV-23, CV-24, CV-25, CV-26, CV-27, CV-28, CV-29 & CV-30 reclass. CVL before or after commission.

On 1 October 1952 CVs & CVBs reclassified CVA.

Commencing with the Antietam (CVS-36), former CVA-36 & CV-36, hull numbers

would no longer be in order of constructed carrier, and of the total carriers commissioned less those cancelled (12), hull number counting remained consistent, while the actual number of commissioned carries as of Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) total 64. George H.W. Bush (CVN-77) will be once commissioned the 65th commissioned carrier.

The Navy Department approved the donation of Yorktown to the Patriot's Point Development Authority, Charleston, South Carolina; formally Dedicated as a Memorial on the 200th anniversary of the Navy for a museum ship in South Carolina on 13 October 1975.

Shortly after 15 March 1974, a campaign led by real estate developer Zachary Fisher and the Intrepid Museum Foundation saved the fourth Intrepid. Formally Dedicated as a Memorial

The eighth Hornet (CVS-12), former CVA-12, CV-12 & Kearsarge was designated National Historic Landmark by the National Park Service on 4 December 1991. Hornet was towed to Hunters Point Naval Shipyard in late 1994. Captain Jim Dodge, Commanding Officer NAS Alameda, seeks and receives approval to borrow and relocate former Hornet to NAS Alameda for five months to use for display purposes as a part of the NAS base closure historical preservation process on 11 May 1995. Moved from NAS Alameda to FISC Oakland to await salvage disposition in September 1995. During the summer of 1995, 85,000 people tour former Hornet. The Aircraft Carrier HORNET Foundation is formed to save the Hornet on 23 October 1995. Moved back to NAS Alameda (pier 3) to await donation disposition on 4 December 1995. Saved from the scrap heap by the efforts of historically-minded citizens and was donated to The Aircraft Carrier Hornet Foundation for use as a museum at Alameda, Calif. by the U.S. Navy on 26 May 1998. Recommissioned a third time at NAS Alameda (pier 3) for use as a museum at Alameda, Calif. by the U. S. Navy on 17 October 1998. Designated a California State Historic Landmark. She is listed on the National Register of Historic places, #91002065.

The fifth Lexington (AVT-16), former CVT-16, CVS-16, CVA-16, CV-16 & Cabot was donated as USS Lexington Museum on the Bay on 15 June 1992 and now operates as such in Corpus Christi, Texas.

USS Midway (CV-43), Former CVA-41 & CVB-41 was donated on 12 September 2003 and began her journey from the Navy Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility, Bremerton, Washington, to San Diego, California via Oakland, Calif., in preparation for use as a museum and memorial. Towed to the Broadway Pier in San Diego where she will be part of a major museum ship devoted to carriers and naval aviation on 10 January 2004.

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY FISCAL YEAR (FY) 2015 BUDGET - Ref. 2-SH

 

Summary History Reports of Aircraft Carriers from CV-59 to CVN-68 covered in Chapters VI, VIII & XX of Commissioned, Recommissioned, Reclassified, Redesignated, Sank, Decommissioned, Sold or Donated for Museum is located in CHAPTER VI, APPENDIX I of Aircraft Carrier Ship History or below:

 

SUMMARY HISTORY REFERENCES ARE LOCATED AT U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016) TABLE OF CONTENTS AND BIBLIOGRAPHY

Ref. U.S. Navy Deployment History Resources