U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRERS OPERATING ON THE EAST AND WEST COAST DURUING OPERATION MAGIC CARPET, OPERATION CROSSROADS, KEEL LAID DOWN, LAUNCHING, COMMISSIONING, SANK, INACTIVATION, IN COMMISSION IN RESERVE, DECOMMISSIONING, SOLD OR DECOMMISSIONED IN RESERVE AND STRICKEN FROM THE NAVAL REGISTER (1946 to 1947)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIER SHIP

HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRERS OPERATING ON THE EAST AND WEST COAST DURUING OPERATION MAGIC CARPET, OPERATION CROSSROADS, KEEL LAID DOWN, LAUNCHING, COMMISSIONING, SANK, INACTIVATION, IN COMMISSION IN RESERVE, DECOMMISSIONING, SOLD OR DECOMMISSIONED

IN RESERVE AND STRICKEN FROM THE NAVAL REGISTER (1946 to 1947)

 

 

“The surrender ceremony aboard the battleship Missouri in Tokyo Bay was on 2 September 1945” (Ref. 621).

 

“On 6 September 1945, the first task force returned stateside, stopping at Okinawa to pickup some passengers. The Navy returned 8,241 men in September and War Shipping Administration returned 260,000. The goal was to get as many men home in time for Christmas as possible.

 

The War Shipping Administration had recognized the magnitude of the demobilization and started converting Liberty and Victory ships to troop transports. These were for the return of men from Europe to the U.S. for 30-day leave or for direct transportation of air service units to the Pacific Theater. The Navy swung into action in the Pacific. Not just attack transports and hospital ships, but carriers landed their planes and installed bunks and extra sanitation” (Ref. 621).

 

“By the end of her Magic Carpet service, USS Saratoga (CV-3) had brought home 29,204 Pacific war veterans, more than any other individual ship. At the time, she also held the record for the greatest number of aircraft landed on a carrier, with a lifetime total of 98,549 landings in 17 years” (Ref. 1-Saratoga & 72).

 

USS Ticonderoga (CV-14) returned from her "Magic-Carpet" run January 1946 before entering the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard to prepare for inactivation” (Ref. 1-Ticonderoga).

 

USS Antietam (CV-36) arrived San Francisco, Calif. in late 1945 or early 1946, ending her first transpacific voyage and first major deployment toward the end of World War II operating off the coast of the Asian mainland in Chinese waters near Shanghai in the Yellow Sea. Three days out of Oahu, Antietam’s mission changed from combat to occupation support duty, when word was received of the Japanese capitulation and the consequent cessation of hostilities” (Ref. 1-Antietam & 72).

 

“Upon her return in early January 1946 from Puget Sound, Bremerton, Washington, USS Shangri-la (CV-38) began normal operations out of San Diego, California, primarily engaged in pilot carrier landing qualifications” (Ref. 1-Shangri-la & 72). 

 

USS Intrepid (CV-11) activity during 1946 is not reported.

 

USS Bunker Hill (CV-17) remained with the "Operation Magic Carpet" fleet, as a unit of TG 16.12, returning veterans from the Pacific until January 1946 when she was ordered to Bremerton for inactivation” (Ref. 1-Bunker Hill & 72). 

 

USS Langley (CVL-27) departed from Philadelphia 15 November 1945 for the first of two trips in the Atlantic Ocean to Europe, transporting Army troops returning home from that theater in November 1945 to January 1946” (Ref. 1-Langley & 72).

 

USS Langley (CVL-27) returned to Philadelphia 6 January 1946” (Ref. 1-Langley).

 

“In January 1946, Bunker Hill (CV-17), the 17th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by hull no. was placed out of commission in reserve and berthed with the Bremerton Group, Pacific Reserve Fleet; received the Presidential Unit Citation for the period 11 November 1943 to 11 May 1945; received 11 battle stars for her World War II service; nicknamed "Holiday Express" for her many attacks launched around the end of the year; commissioned 24 May 1943, Captain J. J. Ballentine in command; launched 7 December 1942 by Bethlehem Steel Company, Quincy, Massachusetts, sponsored by Mrs. Donald Boynton; keel was laid in September 1941 as an Essex-class aircraft carrier of the United States Navy” (Ref. 1-Bunker Hill & 72).

 

“On 10 January 1946, Bataan (CVL-29), former CV-29 & Buffalo (CL-99), the 29th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by hull no. arrived at Philadelphia to prepare for inactivation; assigned at the end of WW II "Magic Carpet" duty, received six battle stars during World War II; commissioned 17 November 1943, Captain V. H. Schaeffer in command; and reported to the Pacific Fleet; launched 1 August 1943 by New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey; sponsored by Mrs. George D. Murray, wife of Rear Admiral Murray; reclassified CVL-29, 15 July 1943; redesignated CV-29; keel was laid down as Buffalo (CL-99) and under construction as a CVL 31 August 1942 at New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey; redesignated CV-29 and renamed Bataan 2 June 1942; keel was laid down as Buffalo (CL-99) at New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey, contract awarded 16 December 1940” (Ref. 1-Bataan & 72).

 

USS Yorktown (CV-10) reached Francisco, Calif. again on 13 January 1946” (Ref. 1-Yorktown & 72).

 

“From 8 November to 16 January 1946, USS Bon Homme (CV-31) made trans-Pacific voyages, assigned to Operation Magic Carpet personnel transportation service returning servicemen to the United States, receiving one battle stars for World War II service” (Ref. 1-Bon Homme & 72).

 

“The second Bon Homme Richard (CV-31), the 31st aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by hull no. became inactive at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard from 16 January 1946; receiving one battle stars for World War II service; commissioned 26 November 1944, with Captain A. O. Rule, Jr., in command; launched 29 April 1944 by New York Navy Yard, sponsored by Mrs. J. S. McCain, wife of Vice Adm. McCain; keel was laid down in 1943, at the New York Navy Yard, Brooklyn, New York, as a 27,100-ton Essex-class aircraft carrier built, the second United States Navy ship of that name, was named in honor of John Paul Jones' famous frigate, which he had named the French language equivalent of "Poor Richard," in honor of Benjamin Franklin's almanac of that name” (Ref. 1-Bon Homme & 72).

 

“The seventh Enterprise (CV-6), the sixth aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by hull no. entered the Norfolk Navy Yard on 18 January 1946 for inactivation; receiving 20 battle stars for World War II service in the Pacificcommissioned 12 May 1938, Captain N.H. White in command; launched 3 October 1936 at Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., Newport News, Virginia; sponsored by Mrs. Lulie Swanson, wife of the Secretary of the Navy; laid down at Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Co., Newport News, Va. in 1935” (Ref. 1-Enterprise & 72).

 

“On 20 January 1946, USS Hancock (CV-19) arrived Alameda, California, ending her second "Magic Carpet" voyage, sailing from Manila, R.P., carrying 3,773 passengers, having made her first "Magic Carpet" cruise (2 November 1945 to 4 December 1945) carrying 4,000 passengers, sailing from Seeadler Harbor, Manus, Admiralty Islands, 2 November 1945, having dispatched planes to fly overhead when the formal surrender of the Japanese Imperial Government was signed on board battleship USS Missouri, her second deployment ended, since the end of WW II to the Pacific Ocean; awarded the Navy Unit Commendation and received four battle stars for World War II; since her commission 15 April 1944” (Ref. 1-Hancock & 72).

 

“Between 8 November 1945 and 28 January 1946 USS Cowpens (CVL-25) made two voyages to Pearl Harbor, Guam, and Okinawa to return veterans” (Ref. 1-Cowpens & 72).

 

USS Independence (CVL-22) arrived San Francisco, Calif. on her last run from Guam, and Iwo Jima on 28 January 1946 returning veterans” (Ref. 618).

 

USS Belleau Wood CVL-24 remained at San Diego, Ca. until 31 January 1946” (Ref. 1-Belleau Wood & 72).

 

“In late January 1946, USS Yorktown (CV-10) moved north to Bremerton, Washington” (Ref. 1-Yorktown & 72).

 

USS Tarawa (CV-40) remained in the Norfolk, Va. from 8 December 1945 to 15 February 1946, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 8th Fleet” (Ref. 1-Tarawa & 72).

 

USS Hancock (CV-19) with Air Group 7 embarked, departed San Diego, Ca. 18 February 1946 for air operations off the coast of California and then departed on her third deployment in the Pacific Ocean to embark men of two air groups and aircraft at Pearl Harbor for transportation to Saipan, having made her second "Magic Carpet" voyage (11 December 1945 to 20 January 1946), sailing from Manila, R.P., carrying 3,773 passengers, and her first "Magic Carpet" cruise (2 November 1945 to 4 December 1945) carrying 4,000 passengers, sailing from Seeadler Harbor, Manus, Admiralty Islands, 2 November 1945, having dispatched planes to fly overhead when the formal surrender of the Japanese Imperial Government was signed on board battleship USS Missouri, she will under go her third deployment since the end of WW II to the Pacific Ocean; awarded the Navy Unit Commendation and received four battle stars for World War II; since her commission 15 April 1944” (Ref. 1-Hancock & 72).

 

The third Kearsarge (CV-33), the 33rd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 39th, commissioning on 2 March 1946, Captain Francis J. McKenna in command; launched on 5 May 1945 by the New York Naval Shipyard, New York, sponsored by Mrs. Aubrey W. Fitch; keel was laid in March 1944, as a United States Navy Ticonderoga-class aircraft carrier” (Ref. 1-Kearsarge & 72).

 

“In early March 1946, USS Bennington (CV-20) transited the Panama Canal en route to Norfolk, Virginia” (Ref. 1-Bennington & 72).

 

“The Coral Sea (CVB-43), former CV-42, the 43rd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by hull no. was launched 2 April 1946 by Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company of Newport News, Virginia; sponsored and christened by Mrs. Thomas C. Kincaid, a wife of RADM Thomas Kincaid, who had commanded a cruiser division under RADM Frank Jack Fletcher at Coral Sea, a Coral Sea hero. While under construction the unnamed (CV-42) was first named the Coral Sea, the 43rd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy 10 October 1944; keel was laid down 10 July 1944 at the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company of Newport News, Virginia, originally classified as an aircraft carrier with hull classification symbol CV-42, reclassified as a "Large Aircraft Carrier" (CVB-43) on 15 July 1943, while the contract to build her was awarded 14 June 1943” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35 & 72).

 

“The third Leyte (CV-32), former Crown Point, the 32nd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 40th, commissioning on 11 April 1946, Captain Henry F. MacComsey in command; launched on 23 August 1945, sponsored by Mrs. James M. Mead; renamed the third Leyte on 8 May 1945; a United States Navy Ticonderoga-class aircraft carrier; keel was laid down as Crown Point by Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Newport News, Virginia, on 21 February 1944” (Ref. 1-Leyte & 72).

 

USS Hancock (CV-19) with Air Group 7 embarked, arrived Alameda, Ca. 23 April 1946, ending her third deployment in the Pacific Ocean, having embarked men of two air groups and aircraft at Pearl Harbor for transportation to Saipan (1 April 1946), loaded a cargo of aircraft at Guam and steamed by way of Pearl Harbor to Alameda, California, having made her second "Magic Carpet" voyage (11 December 1945 to 20 January 1946), from Manila, R.P., carrying 3,773 passengers, and her first "Magic Carpet" cruise (2 November 1945 to 4 December 1945) carrying 4,000 passengers, sailing from Seeadler Harbor, Manus, Admiralty Islands, 2 November 1945, having dispatched planes to fly overhead when the formal surrender of the Japanese Imperial Government was signed on board battleship USS Missouri, her third deployment ended, since the end of WW II to the Pacific Ocean; awarded the Navy Unit Commendation and received four battle stars for World War II; since her commission 15 April 1944” (Ref. 1-Hancock & 72).

 

USS Hancock (CV-19) departed Alameda, Ca. 29 April 1946 and steamed to Seattle, Washington to await inactivation” (Ref. 1-Hancock & 72).    

 

USS Hancock (CV-19), former fourth Ticonderoga decommissioned 1 May 1946 and entered the Pacific Fleet Reserve at Bremerton, Washington; made three "Magic Carpet" cruises at the end of World War II; awarded the Navy Unit Commendation and received four battle stars for World War II; commissioned at the Norfolk Navy Yard on 15 April 1944, Captain Fred C. Dickey in command; launched 24 January 1944; sponsored by Mrs. DeWitt C. Ramsey, wife of Rear Adm. Ramsey, Chief of the Bureau of Aeronautics; renaming of the fourth Ticonderoga to the Hancock occurred on 1 May 1943; keel was laid down as the fourth Ticonderoga 26 January 1943 by the Bethlehem Steel Company, Quincy, Massachusetts, lead ship of a class of modified 27,100-ton Essex class aircraft carriers, keel” (Ref. 1-Hancock, 30 & 72). 

 

“In May 1946, USS Shangri-la (CV-38) sailed for the Central Pacific to participate in Operation Crossroads, the atomic bomb tests conducted at Bikini Atoll” (Ref. 1-Shangri-la & 72).

 

USS Independence (CVL-22) was assigned as a target vessel for the Bikini Atoll  atomic bomb tests during Operation Crossroads and sailed on 2 May 1946 for Pearl Harbor to receive final instructions” (Ref. 1-Independence & 72).

 

“With the arrival of large numbers of Essex-class carriers, USS Saratoga (CV-3) and USS Independence (CVL-22) were surplus to postwar requirements, and she was assigned to Operation Crossroads at Bikini Atoll, to test the effect of the atomic bomb on naval vessels” (Ref. 1-Saratoga & 72).

 

“The Philippine Sea (CV-47), the 47th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 41st, commissioning on 11 May 1946, with Capt. D.S. Cornwell in command; launched on 5 September 1945, sponsored by Mrs. Albert B. Chandler; keel was laid down by the Bethlehem Steel Company, Quincy, Mass. on 19 August 1944” (Ref. 1-Philippine Sea & 72).

 

“On 14 May 1946, USS Franklin (CV-13) leaks carbon dioxide fumes while at the Brooklyn Naval Shipyard, killing two” (Ref. 84A). 

 

“On 29 May 1946, USS Independence (CVL-22) arrived at Bikini Atoll for the atomic bomb tests during Operation Crossroads” (Ref. 618).

 

“While at Bremerton, Washington, the fourth Yorktown (CV-10), former Bon Homme Richard the 10th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by hull no. was placed in commission in reserve 21 June 1946, earned 11 battle stars and the Presidential Unit Citation during World World War II; commissioned on 15 April 1943 at the Norfolk Navy Yard, Captain Joseph J. Clark in command; launched on 21 Januar 1943, sponsored by Eleanor Roosevelt; formerly Bon Homme Richard, renamed Yorktown on 26 September 1942 to commemorate her lost predecessor; keel was laid down on 1 December 1941 at Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Co., Newport News, Virginia as Bon Homme Richard, an Essex-class aircraft carrier” (Ref. 1-Yorktown & 72).

 

“The second Langley (CVL-27), former (CV-27), Fargo (CL-85) & Crown Point (CV-27), the 27th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by hull no. was Inactivated to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet, Philadelphia Group during the remainder of 1946, 31 May 1946. Received nine battle stars for World War II service in the Pacific. Inactivated to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet, Philadelphia Group during the remainder of 1946, 31 May 1946; commissioned on 31 August 1943 with Capt. W. M. Dillon in command; reclassified CVL-27, 15 July 1943 (United States Navy light aircraft carrier); launched at New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey 22 May 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Harry L. Hopkins, wife of the Special Assistant to President Roosevelt; originally named Fargo (CL-85), was renamed Langley 13 November 1942; her keel was laid down as Crown Point (CV-27) by New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey 11 April 1942; originally ordered as the light cruiser; but by the time her keel was laid in April 1942, she had been redesigned as an aircraft carrier, using the original cruiser hull and machinery; an 11,000-ton Independence class aircraft carrier” (Ref. 1- Langley).

 

USS Princeton (CV-37) remained in the Atlantic and operated with the 8thFleet until June 1946 when she transferred to the Pacific Fleet, arriving at San Diego, Ca. 31 June 1946” (Ref. 1-Princeton & 72). 

 

USS Independence (CVL-22) was placed within one-half mile of ground zero for the 1 July 1946 Bikini Atoll atomic bomb tests during Operation Crossroads. The explosion did not sink the ship, she was badly wrecked by the explosion, gutted by fire and further damaged by internal explosions at her position, while an Atomic air burst sank 5 ships”  (Ref. 618).  

 

“Repairs were made to keep the surviving ships afloat from the Bikini Atoll atomic bomb tests during Operation Crossroads and a subsurface Atomic burst on 25 July 1946 sank 9 ships but the now highly radio-active, USS Independence (CVL-22) survived to be used in research in subsequent years” (Ref. 618). 

 

USS Saratoga (CV-3) survived the first blast, an air burst on 1 July 1946, with only minor damage, but was mortally wounded by the second on 25 July, an underwater blast which was detonated under a landing craft 500 yards from the carrier. Salvage efforts were prevented by radioactivity, and seven and one-half hours after the blast, with her funnel collapsed across her deck, Saratoga slipped beneath the surface of the lagoon; actively involved in World War II, received seven battle stars for her World War II service” (Ref. 1-Saratoga & 72). 

 

“Following Operation Crossroads, the atomic bomb tests conducted at Bikini Atoll, USS Shangri-la (CV-38) made a brief training cruise to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, returning to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington, remaining during the winter months of 1946” (Ref. 1-Shangri-la & 72).

 

“The first Saipan (CVL-48), the 48th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy an light aircraft carrier and lead ship of her class of carrier, and in order of commission, the 42nd, commissioning on 14 July 1946, Capt. John G. Crommelin in command; launched on 8 July 1945, sponsored by Mrs. John W. McCormack; keel was laid down on 10 July 1944 by the New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey” (Ref. 1-Saipan & 72).

 

“The fifth Saratoga (CV-3), the third aircraft carrier of the United States Navy was struck from the Naval Vessel Register (Navy List) on 15 August 1946; decommissioned and sank by the U. S. Navy during Operation Crossroads, the atomic bomb tests conducted at Bikini Atoll on 25 July 1946; actively involved in World War II, received seven battle stars for her World War II service; commissioned on 16 November 1927, Capt. Harry E. Yarnell in command; launched on 7 April 1925, sponsored by Mrs. Curtis D. Wilbur, wife of the Secretary of the Navy; ordered converted to an aircraft carrier and reclassified CV-3 on 1 July 1922 in accordance with the Washington Treaty limiting naval armaments; originally laid down on 25 September 1920 as Battle Cruiser #3 by the New York Shipbuilding Corporation, at Camden, New Jersey” (Ref. 1-Saratoga & 72).

 

USS Independence (CVL-22) was towed to Kwajalein on 27 August 1946 as a result of her damage” (Ref. 618).

 

“The highly radioactive hulk of USS Independence (CVL-22) was assigned as a target vessel for the Bikini atomic bomb tests, she was placed within one-half mile of ground zero for the 1 July explosion. The veteran ship did not sink, however, and after taking part in another explosion 25 July was taken to Kwajalein and decommissioned 28 August 1946. The highly radioactive hulk was later taken to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii and San Francisco, Calif. for further test after her final atomic bomb tests during Operation Crossroads at Kwajalein and was finally sunk in weapons tests off the coast of California 29 January 1951” (Ref. 1-Independence & 72). 

 

“The fourth Independence (CVL-22), former CV & light cruiser Amsterdam, CL-59, the 22ndaircraft carrier of the United States Navy by hull no. was decommissioned 28 August 1946; received eight battle stars for World War II service; her radioactive hulk taken to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii and San Francisco, Calif. from Kwajalein after completion of Bikini Atoll atomic bomb tests during Operation Crossroads when she was placed within one-half mile of ground zero for the 1 and 25 July 1946 surface and subsurface Atomic burst; reclassified CVL-22 15 July 1943; commissioned 14 January 1943, with Captain G. R. Fairlamb, Jr., in command; launched 22 August 1942 by New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey, sponsored by Mrs. Rawleigh Warner; keel was laid down in 1941 as a light aircraft carrier, lead ship of her class converted from cruiser hulls, originally light cruiser Amsterdam, CL-59” (Ref. 1-Independence & 72).

 

“Upon completion of overall 18 November 1945, USS Ranger (CV-4) remained on the eastern seaboard until decommissioned at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard 18 October 1946” (Ref. 1-Ranger & 72).

 

“The sixth Ranger (CV-4) was struck from the Naval Vessel Register (Navy List) 29 October 1946; was the first ship of the United States Navy to be designed and built from the keel up as an aircraft carrier; received two battle stars for World War II service; the only large carrier in the Atlantic Fleet, Ranger led the task force comprising herself and four Sangamon-class escort aircraft carriers that provided air superiority during the amphibious invasion of German dominated French Morocco which commenced the morning of 8 November 1942; commissioned at the Norfolk Navy Yard 4 June 1934, Capt. Arthur L. Bristol in command; launched 25 February 1933, sponsored by Mrs. Lou Henry Hoover (wife of the President of the United States); the fourth aircraft carrier of the United States Navy and the first ship of the United States Navy to be designed and built from the keel up as an aircraft carrier; laid down 26 September 1931 by Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., Newport News, Virginia” (Ref. 1- Ranger & 72). 

“The Valley Forge (CV-45), the 43rd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy was commissioned on 3 November 1946, with Capt. John W. Harris in command; launched on 18 November 1944, sponsored by Mrs. A. A. Vandegrift, wife of the Commandant of the Marine Corps; keel was laid down on 7 September 1944 by the Philadelphia Navy Yard, built with money raised by the citizens of Philadelphia in a special war bond drive” (Ref. 1-Valley Forge & 72). 

 

“Following pre-inactivation overhaul, USS Bennington (CV-20) went out of commission in reserve at Norfolk, Virginia 8 November 1946; commissioned 6 August 1944, Captain J. B. Sykes in command; launched  28 February 1944 by New York Navy Yard, sponsored by Mrs. Melvin J. Maas, wife of Congressman Maas of Minnesota; keel was laid down in December 1942 by New York Navy Yard as an Essex-class aircraft carrier” (Ref. 1-Bennington & 72). 

 

Cowpens  (CVL-25), former CV-25, the 25th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by hull no. was placed in commission in reserve at Mare Island 3 December 1946; received Navy Unit Commendation and 12 battle stars for World War II service; reclassified CVL-25 on 15 July 1943 (United States Navy light aircraft carrier); reclassified CVL-25 on 15 July 1943 (United States Navy light aircraft carrier); commissioned 28 May 1943, Captain R. P. McConnell in command; launched 17 January 1943 by New York Shipbuilding Corp., New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey , N.J., sponsored by Mrs. M. H. Spruance; daughter of Vice Admiral W. F. Halsey; keel was laid down by New York Shipbuilding Corp., New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey , N.J. 17 November 1941” (Ref. 1- Cowpens & 72).

 

USS Saipan (CVL-48) trained student pilots out of Pensacola, Florida from September 1946 to 31 December 1946” (Ref. 1-Saipan & 72).

 

USS Saipan (CVL-48) trained student pilots out of Pensacola, Florida from September 1946 to 31 December 1946” (Ref. 1-Saipan & 72).

 

“During the month of December 1946, the peak of Operation Magic Carpet, 700,000 were returned from the Pacific Theater by 369 ships. Of these, 370,000 were by the Navy's Magic Carpet. So many men were returned that the rail system was unable to get them all home” (Ref. 621).

 

“On 9 January 1947, the seventh Essex (CV-9), the 9th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy was placed out of commission in reserve; continued defensive combat air patrols following the surrender of Japan until 3 September 1945 when she was ordered to Bremerton, Washington for inactivation, receiving the Presidential Unit Citation, and 13 battle stars for World War II service; commissioned 31 December 1942, Captain Donald B. Duncan commanding; Launched 31 July 1942 by Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., sponsored by Mrs. Artemus L. Gates, wife of the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Air; keel was laid down in 1941 at the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., the lead ship of her class under construction before WW II at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co.” (Ref. 1-Essex & 72).

 

“On 9 January 1947, the fourth Ticonderoga (CV-14), the 14th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by hull no. was placed out of commission and berthed with the Bremerton Group of the Pacific Reserve Fleet, receiving the Navy Unit Commendation, Presidential Unit Citation, and five battle stars during World War II; commissioned at the Norfolk Navy Yard on 8 May 1944, Captain Dixie Kiefer in command; launched on 7 February 1944, sponsored by Miss Stephanie Sarah Pell; renaming of the Hancock to the fourth Ticonderoga (CV-14) occurred on 1 May 1943 (The name itself refers to the historic Fort Ticonderoga which played a part in early American history. It was to become the lead ship of the Ticonderoga class, though it and other ships of this class are often subsumed into the Essex class carriers); keel was laid down as Hancock on 1 February 1943 at Newport News, Virginia, by the Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co.” (Ref. 1-Ticonderoga & 72).

 

“The second Bon Homme Richard (CV-31), the 31st aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by hull no. was generally inactive at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard from 16 January 1946 until decommissioning at Seattle, Washington 9 January 1947; receiving one battle stars for World War II service; commissioned 26 November 1944, with Captain A. O. Rule, Jr., in command; launched 29 April 1944 by New York Navy Yard, sponsored by Mrs. J. S. McCain, wife of Vice Adm. McCain; keel was laid down in February 1943, at the New York Navy Yard, Brooklyn, New York, as a 27,100-ton Essex-class aircraft carrier built, the second United States Navy ship of that name, was named in honor of John Paul Jones' famous frigate, which he had named the French language equivalent of "Poor Richard," in honor of Benjamin Franklin's almanac of that name” (Ref. 1-Bon Homme & 72).

 

Cowpens  (CVL-25), former CV-25, the 25th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by hull no. was decommissioned 13 January 1947; placed in commission in reserve at Mare Island 3 December 1946; received Navy Unit Commendation and 12 battle stars for World War II service; reclassified CVL-25 on 15 July 1943 (United States Navy light aircraft carrier); reclassified CVL-25 on 15 July 1943 (United States Navy light aircraft carrier); commissioned 28 May 1943, Captain R. P. McConnell in command; launched 17 January 1943 by New York Shipbuilding Corp., New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey , N.J., sponsored by Mrs. M. H. Spruance; daughter of Vice Admiral W. F. Halsey; keel was laid down by New York Shipbuilding Corp., New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey , N.J. 17 November 1941” (Ref. 1-Cowpens & 72).

 

“During 1947, Belleau Wood (CVL-24),  former CV & New Haven (CL-76), the 24th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by hull no. was moored at various docks in the San Francisco , Ca. area undergoing inactivation, placed out of commission in reserve at Alameda Naval Air Station 13 January 1947; received the Presidential Unit Citation and twelve battle stars during World War II; reclassified CVL-24 on 15 July 1943 (United States Navy light aircraft carrier); commissioned 31 March 1943, Captain A. M. Pride in command; launched 6 December 1942 by New York Shipbuilding Corp., Camden, N. J.; sponsored by Mrs. Thomas Holcomb, wife of the Commandant of the Marine Corps; redesignated CV-24 & renamed Belleau Wood from New Haven (CL-76) 16 February 1942; keel was laid down as New Haven (CL-76) at New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey 11 August 1941” (Ref. 1-Belleau Wood & 72).

 

“The eighth Hornet (CV-12) was decommissioned in San Francisco 15 January 1947, and joined the Pacific Reserve Fleet, while at the end of WW II, she earned nine battle stars for her service in World War II, and was one of nine carriers to be awarded the Presidential Unit Citation, she was deployed 16 continuous months since her departure from Norfolk, Va. 14 February 1944 to join the Fast Carrier Task Force, departing the Philippines 15 January 1947, following the end of World War II, she arrived San Francisco, Ca. 7 July 1946 for overhaul, having been in action in the forward areas of the Pacific combat zone, sometimes within 40 miles of the Japanese home islands, while under air attack 59 times, she was never hit.  Hornet’s aircraft destroyed 1410 Japanese aircraft (only USS Essex (CV-9) exceeded this record), while ten of her pilots attained "Ace in a Day" status (30 of her 42 VF-2 Hellcat pilots were aces). In one day, her aircraft shot down 72 enemy aircraft, and in one month, they shot down 255 aircraft. Hornet supported nearly every Pacific amphibious landing after March 1944. Her air groups destroyed or damaged 1,269,710 tons of enemy shipping, and scored the critical first hits in sinking the battleship Yamato.

 

In 1945, she launched the first strikes against Tokyo since the 1942 Doolittle Raid; conducting shakedown training off Bermuda after her commissioning 29 November 1943; commissioned 29 November 1943, Captain Miles M. Browning in command; launched 30 August 1943 by the Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Newport News, Virginia; sponsored by Mrs. Frank M. Knox, wife of the Secretary of the Navy; keel was laid down 3 August 1942, having been set down as Kearsarge under construction at the Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Newport News, Virginia, renamed in honor of the seventh Hornet (CV-8) that was sunk in the Battle of Santa Cruz on 26 October 1942” (Ref. 1-Hornet 72 & 324).

 

“The sixth Ranger (CV-4) was sold for scrap to Sun Shipbuilding and Drydock Company, Chester, Pennsylvania, 28 January 1947; struck from the Naval Vessel Register (Navy List) 29 October 1946” (Ref. 1-Ranger & 72).

 

“The second Wright (CVL-49), the 49th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 44th, commissioning at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard on 9 February 1947, Captain Frank T. Ward in command; launched on 1 September 1945, (the day before the formal Japanese surrender ceremony on board the battleship USS Missouri (BB-63) in Tokyo Bay), sponsored by Mrs. Harold S. Miller, a niece of the Wright brothers; keel was laid down on 21 August 1944 at Camden, New Jersey, by the New York Shipbuilding Corporation, as a Saipan-class light aircraft carrier and named after the Wright brothers” (Ref. 1-Wright & 72).

 

Bataan (CVL-29), former CV-29 & Buffalo (CL-99), the 29thaircraft carrier of the United States Navy by hull no. was placed out of commission in reserve 11 February 1947; arrived at Philadelphia to prepare for inactivation; assigned at the end of WW II "Magic Carpet" duty, received six battle stars during World War II; commissioned 17 November 1943, Captain V. H. Schaeffer in command; and reported to the Pacific Fleet; launched 1 August 1943 by New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey; sponsored by Mrs. George D. Murray, wife of Rear Admiral Murray; reclassified CVL-29, 15 July 1943 (United States Navy light aircraft carrier); redesignated CV-29 and renamed Bataan 2 June 1942; keel was laid down as Buffalo (CL-99), at New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey in 1941” (Ref. 1-Bataan & 72).

 

“Inactive at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, assigned to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet, Philadelphia Group during the remainder of 1946, the second Langley (CVL-27), former (CV-27), Fargo (CL-85) & Crown Point (CV-27), the 27th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by hull no. was decommissioned there 11 February 1947. Received nine battle stars for World War II service in the Pacific. Inactivated to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet, Philadelphia Group during the remainder of 1946, 31 May 1946; commissioned on 31 August 1943 with Capt. W. M. Dillon in command; reclassified CVL-27, 15 July 1943 (United States Navy light aircraft carrier); launched at New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey 22 May 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Harry L. Hopkins, wife of the Special Assistant to President Roosevelt; originally named Fargo (CL-85), was renamed Langley 13 November 1942; her keel was laid down as Crown Point (CV-27) by New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey 11 April 1942; originally ordered as the light cruiser; but by the time her keel was laid in April 1942, she had been redesigned as an aircraft carrier, using the original cruiser hull and machinery; an 11,000-ton Independence class aircraft carrier” (Ref. 1-Langley & 72). 

 

Monterey CVL-26, former (CV-26) & Dayton (CL-78), the 26th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by hull no. was decommissioned 11 February 1947, and was assigned to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet, Philadelphia Group; received eleven battle stars for World War II service in the Pacific reclassified CVL-26 on 15 July 1943, an Independence-class light aircraft carrier of the United States Navy; commissioned 17 June 1943, Captain Lestor T. Hundt in command; launched 28 February 1943, sponsored by Mrs. P.N.L. Bellinger; redesignated CV-26 on 27 March 1942 and renamed Monterey four days later; keel was originally laid down as light cruiser Dayton (CL-78) on 29 December 1941 by New York Shipbuilding, Camden, New Jersey” (Ref.1-Monterey & 72).

“The second Lake Champlain (CV-39), the 39th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by hull no. retired to the "Mothball Fleet" at Norfolk, Va., decommissioning 17 February 1947; commissioned 3 June 1945 and sponsored by Mrs. Warren Austin, wife of Senator Austin of Vermont the same day, with Capt. Logan C. Ramsey in command; launched by float 2 November 1944; keel was laid down in dry-dock by the Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth Va., 15 March 1943” (Ref. 1-Lake Champlain & 72).

 

“The seventh Enterprise (CV-6), the sixth aircraft carrier of the United States Navy was decommissioned on 17 February 1947 and her proud name was struck from the Naval Vessel Register (Navy List); earned the Presidential Unit Citation, received the Navy Unit Commendation and 20 battle stars for World War II service; notable for launching the Doolittle Raid, as a participant in the Battle of Midway, and for action in the Solomons before being mortally wounded in the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands; entered the Norfolk Navy Yard on 18 January 1946 for inactivation; commissioned 12 May 1938, Captain N.H. White in command; launched 3 October 1936 at Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., Newport News, Virginia; sponsored by Mrs. Lulie Swanson, wife of the Secretary of the Navy; laid down at Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Co., Newport News, Va. in 1935” (Ref. 1-Enterprise & 72).

 

“Following the end of the war, the fifth Franklin (CV-13), the 13th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by hull no. was opened to the public for Navy Day celebrations and on 17 February 1947 was placed out of commission at Bayonne, New Jersey; taken in tow by Pittsburgh (CA-72) until she managed to churn up speed to 14 knots (26 km/h) and proceed to Ulithi and then to Pearl Harbor where a cleanup job permitted her to sail under her own power to the Brooklyn Navy Yard, arriving on 28 April; received four battle stars for World War II service; commissioned on 31 January 1944, with Captain James M. Shoemaker in command. Among the plankowners was a ship's band made up of drafted and enlisted professional musicians of the era, including Saxie Dowell and Deane Kincaide, assigned to Shoemaker by lottery.  Launched by Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co. Newport News, Virginia, on 14 October 1943, sponsored by Lieutenant Commander Mildred A. McAfee, USNR, Director of the WAVES; keel was laid in 1942 at the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co. Newport News, Virginia, nicknamed "Big Ben", was an Essex-class aircraft carrier of the United States Navy, notable as the hardest-hit carrier to survive World War II” (Ref. 1-Franklin & 72).

 

“On 17 February 1947, the ninth Wasp (CV-18), former Oriskany, the 18th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by hull no. was placed out of commission in reserve, and was assigned to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet; actively involved in World War II, highlighted by the Battle of Leyte Gulf, she earned eight battle stars for her World War II service; commissioned on 24 November 1943, Captain Clifton A. F. Sprague in command; launched on 17 August 1943, sponsored by Miss Julia M. Walsh, the sister of Senator David I. Walsh of Massachusetts; renamed Wasp on 13 November 1942, in honor of her fallen predecessor CV-7; keel was laid down as Oriskany on 18 March 1942 at Quincy, Massachusetts, by the Bethlehem Steel Company as an Essex-class aircraft carrier” (Ref. 1-Wasp & 72).

 

“The second Cabot (CVL-28), CV-28 & former Wilmington (CL-79), the 28th  aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by hull no. was placed out of commission in reserve at assigned to Atlantic Reserve Fleet, Philadelphia Group Philadelphia 11 February 1947; earned the Presidential Unit Citation, received nine battle stars during World War II; commissioned 24 July 1943, Captain M. F. Shoeffel in command; reclassified CVL-28 on 15 July 1943; launched 4 April 1943 by New York Shipbuilding Co., Camden, N.J.; sponsored by Mrs. A. C. Read; renamed Cabot from Wilmington (CL-79) 23 June 1942, converted while building; redesignated CV-28 on 2 June 1942; keel was laid down as Wilmington (CL-79) at New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey 16 March 1942” (Ref. 1-Cabot & 72).

 

“By March 1947, Operation Magic Carpet was dissolved. On the one-year anniversary of the surrender, the navy's demobilization was complete. The demobilization was so quick that much technological knowledge was lost” (Ref. 621).

 

USS San Jacinto (CVL-30), the 21st aircraft carrier of the United States Navy was decommissioned on 1 March 1947 and joined the Pacific Reserve Fleet berthed at San Diego, Calif.; earned five battle stars during World War II and was awarded the Presidential Unit citation; commissioned on 15 November 1943, Capt. Harold M. Martin, in command; launched on 26 September 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Jesse Jones; Reprisal was renamed San Jacinto on 30 January 1943, converted, while building, an Independence-class light aircraft carrier and reclassified as CVL-30; redesignated CV-30 on 2 June 1942; keel was laid down as the light cruiser Newark (CL-100), on 26 October 1942 by the New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey” (Ref. 1-San Jacinto & 72).

 

“The fourth Intrepid (CV-11), the 11th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by hull no. decommissioned on 22 March 1947 and joined the Pacific Reserve Fleet; received five battle stars for World War II service; commissioned 16 August 1943, Captain Thomas L. Sprague in command; Launched 26 April 1943 by Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Newport News, Virginia, sponsored by Mrs. John Howard Hoover; keel was laid down in December 1941 by Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Newport News, Virginia, an Essex-class aircraft carrier of the United States Navy” (Ref. 1-Intrepid & 72). 

 

“The ninth Wasp (CV-18), former Oriskany, the 18th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by hull no. Decommissioned while assigned to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet 9 July 1947 and placed out of commission in reserve, and was assigned to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet; received eight battle stars for World War II service” (Ref. 1-Wasp & 72).

 

“While still incomplete, Oriskany (CV-34), the 34th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by hull no. construction was suspended 12 August 1947; launched 13 October 1945, and sponsored by Mrs. Clarence Cannon; an attack aircraft carrier, keel was laid down 1 May 1944 by the New York Naval Shipyard” (Ref. 1-Oriskany & 72). 

 

“The Coral Sea (CV-43), former CVA-43, CVB-43 & CV-42, the 43rd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 45th, commissioning on 1 October 1947, with her 1st CO Captain A. P. Storrs, III, in command, and reported to the Atlantic Fleet, Norfolk, Va., which was designated as her home port. The ship’s patch insignia in color, signal flag and radio call sign was issued by the U.S. Navy—BIG C, CORAL MARU, AGELESS WARRIOR—which was launched on 2 April 1946 by Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company of Newport News, Va.; it was sponsored and christened by Mrs. Thomas C. Kincaid, wife of RADM Thomas Kincaid, who had commanded a cruiser division under RADM Frank Jack Fletcher at Coral Sea, a Coral Sea hero.  While under construction, the unnamed (CV-42) was first named the Coral Sea, the 43rd aircraft carrier of the U.S. Navy 10 October 1944; keel was laid down 10 July 1944 at the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company of Newport News, Va.. It was originally classified as an aircraft carrier with hull classification symbol CV-42, then reclassified as a “Large Aircraft Carrier” (CVB-43) on 15 July 1943, while the contract to build her was awarded 14 June 1943” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea & 72).

 

“Secretary of the Navy John L. Sullivan spoke at the commissioning ceremonies which took place 1 October 1947, when CAPT Aaron P. "Putt" Storrs, III assumed command” (Ref. 35/43).

 

 “The largest warships afloat at the time, the Midway-class carriers were designed to carry an air group compliment of 133 aircraft. CVB was a new designation for the Midway Class carrier’s, which were, reclassified Large Fleet Carrier's before they were commissioned” (Ref. 35/43).

 

“The Shangri-la (CV-38), the 30th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by hull no. decommissioned and placed in the Pacific Reserve Fleet at San Francisco, Calif. on 7 November 1947; receiving two battle stars for World War II service; commissioned 15 September 1944, Captain James D. Barner in command; launched on 24 February 1944, sponsored by Josephine Doolittle (wife of Jimmy Doolittle); keel was laid down by the Norfolk Navy Yard, at Portsmouth, Virginia, on 15 January 1943 as an Ticonderoga-class aircraft carrier. The name, unique among U.S. Aircraft Carriers, was a reference to the Hornet (CV-8), which had been lost; after the Doolittle Raid, launched from the Hornet, President Roosevelt answered a reporter's question by saying that the raid had come from "Shangri-La", the faraway land of the James Hilton novel Lost Horizon” (Ref. 1-Shangri-la & 72).