U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS RECORD OF

EAST/WEST COAST TRANSFERS AND TRANSITS

(Panama Canal, Cape Horn, Cape of Good Hope and Suez Canal)

 

Summary Total - September 1945 to Present

 

U. S. Aircraft Carrier Deployments and or both Panama Canal, Cape Horn, Cape of Good Hope and Suez Canal Transits and East /West Coast Transfers

Panama Canal, Cape Horn, Cape of Good Hope and Suez Canal Transits and East Coast/West Coast Transfers

 

Part I of VIII – 1928 to 1945

Part II of VIII – 1946 to 1969

Part III of VIII – 1970 to 1989

Part IV of VIII – 1990 to 1993

Part V of VIII – 1994 to 2000

Part VI of VIII – 2001 to 2005

Part VII of VIII – 2006 to 2012

Part VIII of VIII – 2013 to Present

 

2001

 

Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF)

 

Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) is the official name used by the U.S. Government for its War in Afghanistan and Iraq, together with three smaller military actions, under the umbrella of its Global War on Terror (GWOT). The operation was originally called "Operation Infinite Justice", (often misquoted in news articles and political commentary as "Operation Ultimate Justice” (Ref. [1] & 327).

 

“This phrase had previously been restricted to the description of God (among followers of several faiths), and it is believed to have been changed to avoid offense to Muslims” (Ref. [2] & 327).

 

“The term "OEF" typically refers to the war in Afghanistan. Other operations, such as the Georgia Train and Equip Program, are only loosely or nominally connected to OEF, such as through government funding vehicles” (Ref. [4] & 327).

 

“All the operations, however, have a focus on counterterrorism activities.

 

It should be noted that Operation Enduring Freedom - Afghanistan, which is a joint US, UK and Afghan operation, is separate from the ISAF, which is an operation of NATO nations including the USA and UK. The two operations run in parallel, and although has been intended that they merge for some time, this has not yet happened.

 

Operation Enduring Freedom - Afghanistan (OEF-A) began on 7 October 2001, four weeks after the 11 September 2001 terrorist attacks on America. Early combat operations included a mix of air strikes from land-based B-1 Lancer, B-2 Spirit and B-52 Stratofortress bombers; carrier-based F-14 Tomcat and F/A-18 Hornet fighters; and Tomahawk cruise missiles launched from both U.S. and British ships and submarines signaled the start of Operation Enduring Freedom - Afghanistan (OEF-A).

 

The initial military objectives of OEF-A, as articulated by Former President George W. Bush in his Sept. 20th Address to a Joint Session of Congress and his Oct. 7th address to the country, included the destruction of terrorist training camps and infrastructure within Afghanistan, the capture of al-Qaeda leaders, and the cessation of terrorist activities in Afghanistan” (Ref. [5], [6], [7] & 327).

 

“The first US troops on the ground in Afghanistan were Special Operation Forces who were sent in to engage in one of their specialties: unconventional warfare tactics alongside opposition forces; in this case, anti-Taliban groups. Though details about these covert operations initially were not made public, it did not take long for images of horse-mounted soldiers riding with Northern Alliance troops to hit the airwaves” (Ref. 327A).

 

“On 9 November 2001 Mazar-e-sharif became the first Afghan city to be released from the Taliban's grip. In succeeding days, Taloqan, Herat and Shindand were liberated, followed by Kabul, Afghanistan's capital city on 13 November 2001, and Jalalabad on 14 November 2001.

 

These victories were credited to coordination among Northern Alliance commanders and Special Forces liaison teams, Coalition air attacks, the rejection by Afghan citizens of Taliban control, and, in some areas, Taliban forces defecting to the opposition to prevent their own destruction.

 

It was not long after the Northern Alliance's compounded victories in the north that war planners called on the first conventional forces, US Marines of Task Force 58, to join the fight. On 25 November 2001, they seized Objective Rhino, a desert airstrip south of Qandahar, and established a forward operating base (FOB). In addition to establishing the base, a US Marine Corps presence was to help "pressure the Taliban forces in Afghanistan," and "prevent Taliban and Al Qaeda terrorists from moving freely about the country," US Secretary of Defense Rumsfeld said” (Ref. 327A).

 

“During the remaining days of November 2001, Konduz, the last Taliban stronghold in northern Afghanistan fell to opposition forces, and Bagram Airfield near Kabul became a forward operating base.

 

December 2001 was just as active. On 4 December 2001 the first US Army units deployed to Mazar-e-sharif, and on 7 December 2001, Qandahar, the last major Taliban stronghold in Afghanistan surrendered to forces under the command of Hamid Karzai. Marines of Task Force 58 secured Qandahar Airport on 13 December 2001.

 

By mid-month, many of the enemy had been reduced to "pockets" and "pools" of resistance, with some hiding in caves, others on the run. Areas of strong enemy resistance in eastern Afghanistan, most notably in the areas of Tora Bora and Zawar Kili, kept Coalition and opposition forces busy for the remainder of the month.

 

In one bombing raid at Tora Bora, a plume of smoke was reported to have covered an area of two kilometers after a cave complex filled with enemy munitions was struck.

 

Through the course of the operation, more than 100 "Sensitive Site" exploitations had been conducted, seeking evidence of Al Qaida/Taliban or weapons of mass destruction. As forces had attacked "Caves and Tunnels" to deny the enemy safe harbor, "Radio Broadcast and Leaflet Programs" had effectively informed the population of US goals and encouraged enemy forces to surrender.

 

Hamid Karzai was sworn in as the prime minister of the Afghan interim government on 22 December 2001, and the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) was established to assist with security in Kabul” (Ref. 327A).

 

Operation Enduring Freedom-Philippines

 

“The Philippines is a part of Operation Enduring Freedom, formally entitled Operation Freedom Eagle. Finally in December 2001, the mission name was changed to Operation Enduring Freedom-Philippines and was classified as part of the war on terror.

 

In January 2002, members of Special Operations Command, Pacific (SOCPAC), headed by Brig. Gen. Donny Wurster, deployed as Joint Task Force 510 (JTF 510) to support Operation ENDURING FREEDOM – Philippines.

 

More than 1,200 members of SOCPAC and its components joined their counterparts from the Southern Command of the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP), then commanded by Lt. Gen. Roy Cimatu. The mission was to advise and assist the AFP to help combat terrorism in the country. Much of the mission took place on the island of Basilan in the southern Philippines. This deployment of forces was conducted under a Exercise Balikatan 02-1, which is not to be confused with a much larger exercise named Balikatan 02-2 which took place in April 2002 and was purely a training exercise.

 

Basilan was a stronghold of the terrorist group Abu Sayyaf. This group had terrorized the citizens of this beautiful island and wreaked havoc with its economy.

 

By the end of the mission, the two forces had built 81 kilometers of road, improved an airfield and port facility, and dug fresh water wells.

 

US operations in the Philippines are particularly hard to track as political realities make it difficult for the United States to publicly identify counter-terrorism operations and thus current operations are generally identified or associated with other training exercises or with humanitarian operations such as Operation Smiles. Though the United States has had a consistent force presence in the Philippines since OEF-PI began and Balikatan 02-1 formally ended, there has been little discussion of that presence” (Ref. 327B).

 

1. Attack and Aftermath: a glossary of terms, in". Guardian Unlimited. 2001-09-27. http://www.guardian.co.uk/waronterror/story/0,,559312,00.html

 

2. "Infinite Justice, out - Enduring Freedom, in". BBC News. 2001-09-25. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/1563722.stm

 

3. "EUCOM: Operations and Initiatives". EUCOM. http://www.eucom.mil/english/Operations/main.asp. Retrieved 2007-02-06. 

 

4. "Helping Georgia?". Boston University Institute for the Study of Conflict, Ideology and Policy. March–April 2002. http://www.bu.edu/iscip/vol12/areshidze.html. Retrieved 2007-02-14. 

 

5. "Text: Bush Announces Start of a "War on Terror"". globalsecurity.org. 2001-09-20.

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/news/2001/09/mil-010920-usia01.htm

 

6. "Text: President Bush Announces Military Strikes in Afghanistan". globalsecurity.org. 2001-10-07.

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/news/2001/10/mil-011007-usia01.htm

 

7. "Operation Enduring Freedom - Afghanistan". globalsecurity.org. http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/ops/enduring-freedom.htm

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

AIR WING

T.C.

DEPART

RETURN

Days at  Sea

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) – 2nd, 6th, 5th & Central Command            (8th & 9th Red Sea & Gulf of Aden voy. & 3rd Arabian / Persian Gulf dep. & 4th aerial Arabian / Persian Gulf  dep. & 8th North Arabian Sea dep.)

Vieques Is., Puerto Rico
Lant
Strait of Gibraltar

Med
EastLant
NorLant
TD

JMC 01–2

Med

Ionian Sea
Med

8th Suez Canal

Red Sea

Bab-el-Mandeb

Gulf of Aden

North Arabian Sea

Gulf of Oman

Strait of Hormuz

Persian Gulf

4th OSW

1st MIO

MATO

1st OEF

Strait of Hormuz

Gulf of Oman

North Arabian Sea

Gulf of Aden
Bab-el-Mandeb

Red Sea

9th Suez Canal

Med
Strait of Gibraltar
EastLant

CVW-8

AJ

25 Apr 2001

10 Nov 2001

Europe

Middle East

Iraq no Fly Zone

Iraq and  Afghanistan War

Persian Gulf

25th FWFD

200-Days

Training exercises in the Caribbean Sea off the Vieques bombing range, Puerto Rico, Trident Door, a NATO exercise, Joint Maritime Course 20012 (JMC 01–2), a British Royal Navy joint and combined warfare training exercise off the west coast of Scotland, Juniper Hawk with Israeli forces, her aircrews matching their skills against Israeli F-15 Eagles and F-16 Fighting Falcons, her 4th Operation Southern Watch enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq, her 1st Maritime Security Operations (MSO), to protect offshore infrastructure, including Iraqi oil platforms, which provide a critical source of income for the new Iraqi government and supporting operations that are focused on reassuring regional partners of the United States’ commitment to security, which promotes stability and global prosperity; to ensure that ships could "operate freely while transiting the world's oceans" during the Global War on Terrorism, on her Maritime Air Tasking Order (ATO) and her 1st Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), the "military response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, commencing on 7 October 2001.

 

Sailors aboard USS Enterprise spell out "E = MC2x40" on the carrier's flight deck to mark forty years of U.S. Naval nuclear power

 

Ports of call include: Palma de Mallorca, Balearic Is., Spain Toulon, France Cannes, France Naples, Italy Stokes Bay, Gosport, England Clyde River, Glasgow, Scotland Lisbon, Portugal Rhodes, Greece Jebel Ali, UAE and Souda Bay, Creta.

 

CVW-8 Squadrons include: VF-41 (*1), Black Aces, Fighter Squadron, Grumman - F-14A, Tomcat, Jet Fighter; VF-14 (*2), Tophatters, Fighter Squadron, Grumman, F-14A Tomcat, Jet Fighter; VFA-15, Valions, Strike Fighter Squadron, McDonnell-Douglas, FA-18C (N), Hornet, Jet Strike Fighter; VFA-87, Golden Warriors, Strike Fighter Squadron, McDonnell-Douglas, FA-18C (N), Hornet, Jet Strike Fighter; VAQ-141, Shadowhawks, Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron, Grumman, EA-6B Prowler, Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation; VAW-124, Bear Aces, Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron, Grumman, E-2C Hawkeye, Electronics; HS-3, Tridents, Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron, Sikorsky, SH-60F / HH-60H Seahawk -Anti-submarine - Search and Rescue; VS-24, Scouts, Air Anti-Submarine Squadron, Lockheed, S-3B Viking - Anti-Submarine and VRC-40 Det. 2, Rawhides, Fleet Logistics Support Squadron, Grumman, C-2A/US-3A Greyhound. (*1) redesignated VFA-41 on Dec.1, 2002. (*2) redesignated VFA-14 on Dec.1, 2002.

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Battle Group is made up of a battle group staff embarked on USS Enterprise along with Commander, Destroyer Squadron Eighteen and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Eight. The ships in the battle group were: the aircraft carrier Enterprise; cruisers USS Philippine Sea (CG-58); USS Gettysburg (CG-64); USS Stout (DDG-55); USS Gonzalez (DDG-66); guided missile destroyers USS Stout (DDG-55); USS McFaul (DDG-74) and USS Gonzalez (DDG-66); destroyers USS Nicholson (DD-982); USS Thorn (DD-988); guided missile frigate USS Nicholas (FFG-47); logistics ship USS Arctic (AOE-8) and attack submarines USS Jacksonville (SSN-699) and USS Providence (SSN 7-19).

USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) - 2nd, 6th, Central Command & 5th

(1st North Arabian Sea & 4th Arabian / Persian Gulf dep.)

(9th & 10th Red Sea & 7th & 8th Gulf of Aden)

NoLant

7th Med

1st Ionian Sea

11th Suez Canal

Bright Star

5th OSW                                                              1st OEF

12th Suez Canal

NoLant

CVW-1

AB

19 Sep 2001

27 Mar 2002

Europe

Middle East

Iraq no Fly Zone

Afghanistan War

8th FWFD

193-days

Exercise "Bright Star", 5th Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq and 1st Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), the "military response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, commencing on 7 October 2001.

 

Ports of call include: Manama, Bahrain and Marseille, France.

 

Squadrons: VF-102 (*1) (F-14B); VFA-82 (F/A-18C); VFA-86 (F/A-18C); VMFA-251 (F/A-18C); VAQ-137 (EA-6B); VAW-123 (E-2C); VS-32 (S-3B) and HS-11 (HH/SH-60H/F).

 

(*1) VF-102 redesignated VFA-102 on May 1, 2002.

 

USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) battle group is composed of Carrier Air Wing 1, Carrier Group 8, and Commander, Destroyer Squadron 28 (CDS 2) embarked; guided-missile cruisers USS Leyte Gulf (CG-55) and USS Vella Gulf (CG-72); guided-missile destroyers USS Ramage (DDG-61) and USS Ross (DDG-71); destroyers USS Ross (DDG-71), USS Peterson (DD-969) and USS Hayler (DD-997); guided-missile frigate USS Elrod (FFG-55); logistics ship USS Detroit (AOE-4) and HMCS Halifax (FFH-331); and attack submarines USS Hartford (SSN-768); USS Springfield (SSN-761).

USS Nimitz (CVN-68) - 2nd & Pacific

WestLant

& SoLant

5th Carib

2nd Cape Horn

SoPac

EastPac

CVWR 20

NG

21 Sep 2001

13 Nov 2001

Home port transfer to the West Coast

17th FWFD

54-days

Home port transfer from Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia to Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California; Training with Brazilian naval forces; underway off the coast of Uruguay, while training with Uruguayan naval and air forces; a bilateral exercise with Chilean naval and air forces and trained with Peruvian naval forces.

                               

Ports of call included: Pearl Harbor, Hi.

 

Squadrons: VFA-204, FA-18A; VAW-78, E-2C; HS-75, SH-60F / HH-60H; VS-22, S-3B; HC-11 Det., CH-46E and VRC-30 Det. 1, C-2A.

 

Nimitz conducted a 3-year complex mid-life Refueling and Complex Overhaul at her its birthplace of Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia from 26 May 1998 to 28 June 2001.

 

2002

 

Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF)

 

“In January 2002, over 1,200 soldiers from the United States Special Operation Command Pacific (SOCPAC) deployed to Philippines to support the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) in their push to uproot terrorists forces on the island of Basilan. Of those groups included are Abu Sayyaf Group (ASG), al-Qaeda and Jemaah Islamiyah” (Ref. [8] & 327).

 

8. Fargo, ADM Tom (2003-02-10). "PASOC 2003 Conference - Waikiki Beach Marriott Resort". Speeches and Transcripts. U.S. Pacific Command. http://131.84.1.218/speeches/sst2003/030210pasoc.shtml

 

9. "Operation Smiles" (PDF). U.S. Pacific Command. http://131.84.1.218/piupdates/smiles.pdf

 

The operation consisted of training the AFP in counter-terrorist operations as well as supporting the local people with humanitarian aid in Operation Smiles” (Ref. [9] & 327).

 

“By 3 January 2002, ISAF consisted of 4,500 international troops under the command of British Major General John McColl.

 

In January 2002, as Coalition aircraft bombed an Al Qaeda complex at Zawar Kili, the number of Taliban and Al Qaeda detainees under US control continued to increase. On 10 January 2002, the first group of these detainees was flown from Qandahar Airport to Guantanamo, Cuba, where a facility known as Camp X-ray had been prepared to house them. Minutes prior to the first plane's departure, the airfield received small arms fire. The Marines returned fire and launched a quick reaction force to investigate the shot.

 

The Marines of Task Force 58 at Qandahar were relieved 29 January 2002 in place by elements of the Army's 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), which became known as Task Force Rakkasan (Japanese for "parachute"). Four weeks later at the airport, on 28 February 2002, a United Nations' C-130 transloaded 16 metric tons of humanitarian assistance material to UN vehicles, marking the first UN humanitarian assistance cargo flights into Afghanistan.

 

The next day, Coalition forces from Australia, Canada, Denmark, France, Germany and Norway joined US troops in Operation Anaconda, one of the most visible and deadliest operations of the war up to that point. The operation was designed to assault enemy forces in southeastern Afghanistan. When Anaconda concluded, a total of eight American servicemen had been killed and 82 wounded in action.

 

In mid-May 2002, General Tommy Franks established Combined Joint Task Force-180 (CJTF-180) to provide an on-scene command-and-control structure in Afghanistan. The 18th Airborne Corps commander, Lt. General Dan K. McNeill, was appointed as CJTF-180's first commander. He assumed responsibilities for the majority of the forces operating in Afghanistan at that time.

 

At about the same time McNeill moved in to the area of operations, US Special Forces were standing up a new Afghan National Army (ANA). Eventually this task was passed to Combined Joint Task Force Phoenix, initially headed by elements of the 10th Mountain Division (Light), who initiated various training programs for the fledgling ANA). CJTF Phoenix was still in operation as of 2008, some 6 years and 7 command rotations later” (Ref. 327A).

 

“In October 2002, the Combined Task Force 150 and United States military Special Forces established themselves in Djibouti at Camp Le Monier. The stated goals of the operation were to provide humanitarian aid and patrol the Horn of Africa to reduce the abilities of terrorist organizations in the region. Similar to OEF-P, the goal of humanitarian aid was highlighted in order to prevent terrorist organizations from being able to take hold amongst the population as well as reemerge after being removed.

 

The military aspect involves coalition forces searching and boarding ships entering the region for illegal cargo as well as providing training and equipment to the armed forces in the region. The humanitarian aspect involves building schools, clinics and water wells to enforce the confidence of the local people” (Ref. 327).

 

Operation Enduring Freedom Operations

OEF Planning and Implementation

OEF Operations - Campaigns

OEF Operations - Air War

OEF Operations - Maps

OEF-A Order of Battle

Enduring Freedom – Trans Sahara

Enduring Freedom – Chad

Horn of Africa / Djibouti

Philippines

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

AIR WING

T.C.

DEPART

RETURN

Days at  Sea

USS John F. Kennedy     (CV-67) - 2nd, 6th, Central Command & 5th (4th Persian Gulf & 8th & 9th North Arabian Sea)

 

Lant

17th Med

11th Suez Canal

11th Red Sea

9th Gulf of Aden

8th North Arabian Sea

Gulf of Oman

Strait of Hormuz

4th Persian Gulf

Strait of Hormuz

Gulf of Oman 9th North Arabian Sea

10th Gulf of Aden

12th Red Sea

12th Suez Canal

Med

Lant

CVW-7

AG

7 Feb 2002

17 Aug 2002

22nd FWFD

Operation Anaconda and 1st Operation Enduring Freedom.

Ports of call include: Souda Bay, Crete, a bay and natural harbour near the town of Souda on the northwest coast of the Greek island of Crete; Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates (Arabic: جبل علي‎) is a port town, located 35 kilometers (22 mi) southwest of the city of Dubai in the United Arab Emirates. The Port of Jebel Ali is situated in Jebel Ali; Manama, Bahrain, a small island country situated near the western shores of the Persian Gulf, is an archipelago of 33 islands, the largest being Bahrain Island, at 55 km (34 mi) long by 18 km (11 mi) wide. Saudi Arabia lies to the west and is connected to Bahrain by the King Fahd Causeway, while Iran lies 200 km (120 mi) to the north of Bahrain, across the Gulf. The peninsula of Qatar is to the southeast across the Gulf of Bahrain; and Tarragona, Spain, (English /ˌtɑːrəˈɡoʊnə/, Catalan: [tərəˈɣonə], Spanish: [taraˈɣona]; Phoenician: טַרְקוֹן, Tarqon; Latin: Tarraco) is a port city located in the north-east of Spain on the Mediterranean Sea and Marmaris, Turkey, a port town and tourist resort on the Mediterranean coast, located in Muğla Province, southwest Turkey, along the shoreline of the Turkish Riviera.

 

Squadrons: VF-143, F-14B; VF-11, F-14B; VFA-136, FA-18C(N); VFA-131, FA-18C(N); VAQ-140, EA-6B; VAW-121, E-2C; HS-5, SH-60F/HH-60H; VS-31, S-3B and VRC-40 Det. 3, C-2A.

 

USS John F. Kennedy (CVA-67) battle group is composed of Carrier Air Wing 7; Carrier Group 6; Destroyer Squadron 24, consisting of the guided missile cruisers USS Hue City (CG-66), USS Vicksburg (CG-69); guided missile destroyers USS Roosevelt (DDG-80), USS Carney (DDG-64), USS The Sullivans (DDG-68); destroyer USS Spruance (DD-963); guided missile frigates USS Taylor (FFG-50) and USS Underwood (FFG-36) and attack submarines USS Boise (SSN-764) and USS Toledo (SSN-769); and replenishment ship USS Seattle (AOE-3). Amphibious Squadron 8 was assigned in 2002.

USS George Washington (CVN-73) - 2nd, 6th, 5th & Central Command (5th Arabian / Persian Gulf dep.)  (6th voyage) (11th & 12th Red Sea & Gulf of Aden))

NorLant

5th Med

11th Suez Canal

5th OSW

1st OEF

12th Suez Canal

Med

EastLant voyage              MS

Med

EDG

Ionian Sea Adriatic Sea

ODE               Med

NorLant

CVW-17

AA

20 Jun 2002

20 Dec 2002

Europe

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Middle East

Iraq no Fly Zone & Afghanistan War

Persian Gulf

7th FWFD

184-days

NATO Exercise Destined Glory 2002” off the western and southern coasts of Italy and Greece at the end of her deployment, to train a joint capable force in the full spectrum of operational tasks, with the UK/NL Amphibious Task Group at its core with Naval, air and land forces totaling 61 ships, 100 aircraft and more than 8,000 personnel from 12 nations took part in NATO’s largest Mediterranean amphibious exercise, Operation Decisive Edge in the Adriatic Sea, playing a vital peacekeeping role in Bosnia/Herzegovina, while Operation Deny Flight transitioned to Decisive Edge in support of the IFOR Operation Joint Endeavor, where carrier and shore-based squadrons conducted flight operations in support of joint and combined enforcement of a U.N.-mandated no-fly zone in the airspace over the Republic of Bosnia-Herzegovina. (Operation Decisive Edge then transitioned to Deliberate Guard in support of the stabilization force (SFOR) Operation Joint Guard), Mediterranean Shark ‘02 in the Eastern Atlantic in support of the U.S. Marine Corps, a bilateral training exercise conducted in Morocco by a Marine Expeditionary Unit (Special Operations Capable) to show the effectiveness of the Marine Air Ground Task Force (MAGTF), 5th Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq and her 1st Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), the “military response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, commencing on 7 October 2001.

 

Ports of call included: Souda Bay, Greece; Naples, Italy and Souda Bay, Crete Island, Greece.

 

Squadrons: VF-103, F-14B; VFA-34, FA-18C(N); VFA-83, FA-18C(N); VFA-81, FA-18C; VAQ-132, EA-6B; VAW-125, E-2C; HS-15; SH-60F / HH-60H; VS-30, S-3B and VRC-40 Det. 4.

 

USS George Washington (CVN-73) strike group is comprised of Carrier Air Wing 17; Cruiser Destroyer Group 2 and Destroyer Squadron 26, consisting of the guided-missile cruisers USS Normandy (CG-60) and USS Monterey (CG-61); guided-missile destroyers USS Mahan (DDG-72), USS Laboon (DDG-58) and USS Barry (DDG-52); destroyer USS Arthur W. Radford (DD-968); guided-missile frigate USS Kauffman (FFG-59); replenishment ship USS Laramie (T-AO); and attack submarines USS Oklahoma City (SSN-723) and USS Pittsburgh (SSN-720)..

 

2003

 

Operation Iraqi Freedom

 

“The 2003 invasion of Iraq, also called the Iraq War or "Operation Iraqi Freedom", began March 20, 2003, initiated by the United States, the United Kingdom and a loosely-defined coalition” (Ref. 446).

 

Operation Iraqi Freedom, the multi-national coalition effort to liberate the Iraqi people, eliminate Iraq's weapons of mass destruction, and end the regime of Saddam Hussein, began on 20 March 2003 with the firing of Tomahawk missiles from U.S. ships in the Arabian Gulf and Red Sea” (Ref. 1- Constellation & 72).

 

“The invasion began without the explicit authorization of the United Nations Security Council, and some legal authorities take the view that the action violated the U.N. Charter. The Bush Administration has cited Security Council resolutions from early 1990s as legal justification, though there is no clear position in any of them with regard to the use of military action against Iraq.

 

United States military operations were conducted under the name Operation Iraqi Freedom. United Kingdom military operations as Operation Telic, and Australian operations as Operation Falconer” (Ref. 446).

 

At 9:34 PM EST on March 19, 2003 (5:34 AM local time in Baghdad on March 20), United States and United Kingdom forces consisting of 40 cruise missiles and strikes led by 2 F-117s from the 8th Fighter Squadron (supported by Navy EA-6B Prowlers) and other aircraft began conducting military operations against the state of Iraq designed to disarm Iraq of its weapons of mass destruction and to remove the Iraqi Regime from power. Less than two hours after a deadline expired for Saddam Hussein to leave Iraq, the sound of air raid sirens were heard in Baghdad. A short time later, President Bush addressed the American public stating that coalition forces were in the "early stages of military operations to disarm Iraq, to free its people and to defend the world from grave danger."

 

The name of this Operation for British troops is Operation Telic. For Australian Troops involved, it is Operation Falconer.

 

The military objectives of Operation Iraqi Freedom consist of first, ending the regime of Saddam Hussein. Second, to identify, isolate and eliminate, Iraq's weapons of mass destruciton. Third, to search for, to capture and to drive out terrorists from the country. Fourth, to collect intelligence related to terrorist networks. Fifth, to collect such intelligence as is related to the global network of illicit weapons of mass destruction. Sixth, to end sanctions and to immediately deliver humanitarian support to the displaced and to many needed citizens. Seventh, to secure Iraq's oil fields and resources, which belong to the Iraqi people. Finally, to help the Iraqi people create conditions for a transition to a representative self-government.

 

Operation Iraqi Freedom consisted of the largest special operations force since the Vietnam War. While the vast majority of special operations forces were American, the United Kingdom and the Australian militaries also provided forces. In northern Iraq there was a significant special operations presence. Coalition personnel worked with Kurdish fighters against the regime. SOF helped bring in the 173rd Airborne Brigade, and marked and called in coalition air power on regime targets. Special operations forces were also responsible for attacking a number of specific targets such as airfields, weapons of mass destruction sites, and command and control headquarters. In the south, special operations personnel gave aid to conventional forces and did some of the work in the cities to help the Shi'ia elements.

 

Unfortunately, information regarding the number of Coalition sorties seems to differ depending on the sources consulted. No two figures for the same day are the similar, and can differ by as much as 700 sorties. References to the numbers of Tomahawks fired suffer from the same lack of accuracy” (Ref. 446A).

 

“After approximately three weeks of fighting, Iraq was occupied by coalition forces and the rule of Saddam Hussein and his Ba'ath Party came to an end. Subsequently, the period known as post-invasion Iraq began. Approximately 260,000 United States troops, with support from 45,000 British, and smaller forces from other nations, collectively called the "Coalition of the Willing", entered Iraq primarily through a staging area in Kuwait. Plans for opening a second front in the north were abandoned when Turkey officially refused the use of its territory for such purposes. Forces also supported Iraqi Kurdish militia troops, estimated to number upwards of 50,000.

 

Facing them was a large but poorly equipped military force. The regular Iraqi army was estimated at 290,000–350,000 troops, with four Republican Guard divisions with 50,000–80,000 troops, and the Fedayeen Saddam, a 20,000–40,000 strong militia, who used guerrilla tactics during the war. There were an estimated thirteen infantry divisions, ten mechanized and armored divisions, as well as some special forces units. The Iraqi Air Force and Navy played a negligible role in the conflict” (Ref. 446).

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

AIR WING

T.C.

DEPART

RETURN

Days at  Sea

*USS Enterprise (CVN-65) – 2nd, 6th, 5th & Central Command

(10th & 11th Gulf of Aden & Red Sea voy  & & 4th Arabian / Persian Gulf dep. & 5th aerial Arabian / Persian Gulf  dep. & 9th North Arabian Sea dep.)

WestLant
Virginia Capes

Jacksonville
Lant
Med

10th Suez Canal

Red Sea

Bab-el-Mandeb

Gulf of Aden

North Arabian Sea

Gulf of Oman

Strait of Hormuz

Persian Gulf

2nd OEF

2nd MIO

OIH

ESS

Strait of Hormuz

Gulf of Oman

North Arabian Sea
Gulf of Aden

Bab-el-Mandeb

Red Sea
11
th Suez Canal

Med
Lant

CVW-1

AB

28 Aug 2003

29 Feb 2004

Europe Middle East

Iraq no Fly Zone

2nd Iraq War

Persian Gulf

26th FWFD

186-Days

COMPTUEX (Composite Training Unit Exercise) in the Virginia Capes and Jacksonville operating areas, Maritime Interdiction Operations (MIO), Operation Iron Hammer (Iraq 2003), Exercise Sea Saber and 2nd Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), the "military response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, commencing on 7 October 2001.

 

Ports of call include: Manama, Bahrain; Ali, UAE; Naples, Italy and Mayport, FL.

 

Carrier Air Wing One is part of the Enterprise Strike Group and is based out of Naval Air Station Oceana, Va. CVW-1 Squadrons include: VF-211 (*1), Fighting Checkmates, Fighter Squadron, Grumman - F-14A, Tomcat, Jet Fighter; VMFA-312, Checkerboards, Marine Fighter Attack Squadron, McDonnell-Douglas, FA-18A+ Hornet, Jet Strike Fighter; VFA-82, Marauders, Strike Fighter Squadron, McDonnell-Douglas, FA-18C (N), Hornet, Jet Strike Fighter; VFA-86, Sidewinders, Strike Fighter Squadron, McDonnell-Douglas, FA-18C (N), Hornet, Jet Strike Fighter; VAW-123, Screwtops, Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron, Grumman, E-2C Hawkeye, Electronics; VAQ-137, Rooks, Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron, Grumman, EA-6B Prowler, Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation; HS-11, Dragonstayers, Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron, Sikorsky, SH-60F / HH-60H Seahawk -Anti-submarine - Search and Rescue; VS-32, Maulers, Air Anti-Submarine Squadron, Lockheed, S-3B Viking - Anti-Submarine and VRC-40 Det. 2, Rawhides, Fleet Logistics Support Squadron, Grumman, C-2A/US-3A Greyhound. (*1) redesignated VFA-211 on Oct.1, 2004.

 

Commander, Cruiser Destroyer Group 12 serves as Immediate Superior-in-Command for the Enterprise Battle Group, while Destroyer Squadron 18 ship’s consist of the guided-missile cruisers USS Gettysburg (CG-64) and USS Philippine Sea (CG-58); replenishment USS Detroit (AOE-4). D-13 Sarandi (Argentina) also joined the task force. Acting as Operational Commander, CCDG-12 exercises oversight of unit level and integrated training and readiness for the group. In addition, CCDG-12 maintains administrative functions and material readiness tracking for ships and squadrons assigned to the group. CCDG-12 reports to Commander, Second Fleet as one of six Carrier Battle Group Commanders in the Atlantic Fleet.

 

2004

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

AIR WING

T.C.

DEPART

RETURN

Days at  Sea

USS George Washington (CVN-73) - 2nd, 6th, 5th & Central Command (6th Arabian / Persian Gulf dep.)  (7th voyage) (13th & 14th Red Sea & Gulf of Aden))

NorLant

6th Med

Summer Pulse 04

13th Suez Canal

1st OIF

OVR

14th Suez Canal

Med

NorLant

CVW-17

AA

20 Jan 2004

26 Jul 2004

Europe

Middle East

2nd Iraq & Afghanistan War

Persian Gulf

8th FWFD

189-days

Summer Pulse 04, as one of seven carriers worldwide to participate in the exercise, which demonstrates the Navy’s Fleet Response Plan and will take part in Exercise Majestic Eagle, the culmination of Summer Pulse ‘04 which is the Navy’s first deployment under its new FRP, 2nd Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), the “military response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, commencing on 7 October 2001, 1st Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), the multi-national coalition effort to liberate the Iraqi people, eliminate Iraq’s weapons of mass destruction, and end the regime of Saddam Hussein continues, beginning on 20 March 2003 with the firing of Tomahawk missiles from U.S. ships in the Arabian Gulf and Red Sea and Operation Vigilant Resolve following the March 31st killings of four contractors in Fallujah, and the five soldiers near Habbaniya

 

Ports of call included: Souda Bay, Greece; Jabel Ali, UAE (twice) and Naples, Italy.

 

Squadrons: VF-143 (*1), F-14B; VF-11 (*2), F-14B; VFA-136, FA-18C(N); VFA-131, FA-18C(N); VAQ-140, EA-6B; VAW-121, E-2C; HS-5; SH-60F / HH-60H; VS-31, S-3B and VRC-40 Det. 3, CA-2..

 

(*1) redesignated VFA-143 on Mar.1, 2005

(*2) redesignated VFA-11 on Apr.1, 2005

 

On 2 June 2004, the Navy announced the simultaneous deployment of seven carrier strike groups (CSGs) to demonstrate the Navy’s ability to provide credible combat power across the globe by operating in five theaters with other U.S., allied and coalition military forces, dubbed Summer Pulse’04 from 22 March to 10 June 2004. This exercise was the first of the Navy’s new Fleet Response Plan (FRP) slated to result in increased force readiness and the ability to provide combat power in response to a crisis. Along with USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67), the other carriers involved were USS George Washington (CVN-73), USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74), USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63), USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75), USS Enterprise (CVN-65), and USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76).

 

USS George Washington (CVN-73) Strike Group stood at the tip of the spear, and carried the ball for Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Vern Clark’s vision of presence with a purpose.

 

USS George Washington (CVN-73) strike group is comprised of Carrier Air Wing 7; Cruiser Destroyer Group 2 and Destroyer Squadron 28, consisting of the guided-missile cruiser USS Vella Gulf (CG-72); guided-missile destroyers USS Ramage (DDG-61), USS Bulkeley (DDG-84) and USS Ross (DDG-71); USS Toronto (FFH-333) initiated or participated in more than 200 boarding’s of merchant vessels during maritime intervention operations and logged over 12,000 surface contacts in the Persian Gulf; guided-missile frigate USS Elrod (FFG-55); replenishment ship USNS Supply (T-AOE-6); and attack submarines.

USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) - 2nd & Pacific Fleet

SoLant

SoPac         Cape Horn EastPac

SP 04

CVW-11

NH

27 May 2004

23 Jul 2004

West Coast Transfer

South America

1st FWFD

58-days

Summer Pulse 04 and Homeport change: Norfolk, Va. to San Diego, Ca. around the Cape Horn

 

Ports of call included: Rio de Janeiro, Valparaiso, Chile and Callao, Peru.

 

The Ronald Reagan Strike Group, comprised of Commander, Cruiser Destroyer Group (CCDG) 1 and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 11. The air wing, which is normally assigned to the USS Nimitz (CVN-68) Strike Group, embarked only 25 percent of its total strength. Its main purpose while sailing with Ronald Reagan is to complete as many training evolutions as possible. “My priority is to get some great training for some of my younger pilots,” said Capt. Jim Greene, commander CVW 11. “The opportunity to look at the back end of a ship and land an airplane is a training opportunity we don’t want to miss.” CCDG 1 is overseeing all the training exercises, as well as the entire transit to San Diego. “As everyone knows, a major objective of this transit is the inter-fleet transfer of Ronald Reagan from the Atlantic to her new homeport in the Pacific,” said Commander Cruiser Destroyer Group ONE, Rear Adm. Robert T. Moeller

 

USS Thomas S. Gates (CG-51) joined Ronald Reagan task force.

 

CVW-11 squadrons making the transit are the “Tophatters” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 14 flying the F/A-18E Super Hornet, and Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 41, the “Black Aces," and their F/A-18F Super Hornet aircraft, both based at Naval Air Station Lemoore, Calif.; Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 117 “Wallbangers,” flying the E-2C Hawkeye 2000, from Point Magu, Calif.; the “Indians” of Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron (HS) 6 flying the SH-60F Seahawk and Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) 30 “Providers," flying the C-2A Greyhound, both based in San Diego.

 

On 2 June 2004, the Navy announced the simultaneous deployment of seven carrier strike groups (CSGs) to demonstrate the Navy’s ability to provide credible combat power across the globe by operating in five theaters with other U.S., allied and coalition military forces. Dubbed Summer Pulse’04, this exercise was the first of the Navy’s new Fleet Response Plan (FRP) slated to result in increased force readiness and the ability to provide combat power in response to a crisis. Along with USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67), the other carriers involved were USS George Washington (CVN-73), USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74), USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63), USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75), USS Enterprise (CVN-65), and Ronald Reagan.

USS John F. Kennedy     (CV-67) - 2nd, 6th, Central Command & 5th (5th Persian Gulf & 10th & 11th North Arabian Sea)

 

Lant

18th Med

13th Suez Canal

13th Red Sea

11th Gulf of Aden

8th North Arabian Sea

Gulf of Oman

Strait of Hormuz

5th Persian Gulf

Strait of Hormuz

Gulf of Oman 11th North Arabian Sea

12th Gulf of Aden

14th Red Sea

14th Suez Canal

Med

Lant

CVW-17

AA

7 Jun 2004

13 Dec 2004

23rd FWFD

190-Days

Summer Pulse ’04, Operation Phantom Fury (al Fajr, Arabic for “dawn), 1st Operation Iraqi Freedom and 2nd Operation Enduring Freedom.

Ports of call include: Valletta, Malta, a Southern European country consisting of an archipelago situated in the centre of the Mediterranean, 80 km (50 mi) south of Sicily, 284 km (176 mi) east of Tunisia and 333 km (207 mi) north of Libya. Gibraltar lies 1,755 km (1,091 mi) to the west and Alexandria 1,508 km (937 mi) to the East; Manama, Bahrain, a small island country situated near the western shores of the Persian Gulf, is an archipelago of 33 islands, the largest being Bahrain Island, at 55 km (34 mi) long by 18 km (11 mi) wide. Saudi Arabia lies to the west and is connected to Bahrain by the King Fahd Causeway, while Iran lies 200 km (120 mi) to the north of Bahrain, across the Gulf. The peninsula of Qatar is to the southeast across the Gulf of Bahrain; Jebel Ali (Arabic: جبل علي‎) is a port town, located 35 kilometers (22 mi) southwest of the city of Dubai in the United Arab Emirates. The Port of Jebel Ali is situated in Jebel Ali and Tarragona, Spain, (English /ˌtɑːrəˈɡoʊnə/, Catalan: [tərəˈɣonə], Spanish: [taraˈɣona]; Phoenician: טַרְקוֹן, Tarqon; Latin: Tarraco) is a port city located in the north-east of Spain on the Mediterranean Sea.

 

Squadrons: VF-103 (*1), F-14B; VFA-34, FA-18C(N); VFA-83, FA-18C(N); VFA-81, FA-18C; VAQ-132, EA-6B; VAW-125, E-2C Hawkeye 2000; HS-15, SH-60F/HH-60H; VS-30, S-3B and VRC-40 Det. 4, C-2A.

 

(*1) VF-103 redesignated VFA-103 Feb.1, 2005.

 

USS John F. Kennedy (CVA-67) battle group is composed of Carrier Air Wing 7; Carrier Group 6; Destroyer Squadron 24, consisting of the Mayport, Fla.-based ships, the strike group’s flagship, commanded by Capt. Ronald H. Henderson; the guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG-69); the guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG-80); the destroyer USS Spruance (DD-963); the Earle, N.J.-based fast combat support ship USS Seattle (AOE-3); the Groton, Conn.-based attack submarine USS Toledo (SSN-769); and the Naval Air Station Oceana, Va.-based Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 17, commanded by Capt. Mark D. Guadagnini, embarked aboard John F. Kennedy.

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) - 2nd & 6th, 5th & Central Command

(2nd Arabian /Persian Gulf dep.) (3rd & 4th Red Sea & Gulf of Aden)

NorLant

4th Med           3rd Suez Canal

2nd OIF

2nd EAG

4th Suez Canal Med

NorLant

CVW-3

AC

13 Oct 2004

18 Apr 2005

Europe

Middle East

2nd Iraq War

Persian Gulf

5th FWFD

188-days

 

2nd Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), the multi-national coalition effort to liberate the Iraqi people, eliminate Iraq's weapons of mass destruction, and end the regime of Saddam Hussein continues, beginning on 20 March 2003 with the firing of Tomahawk missiles from U.S. ships in the Arabian Gulf and Red Sea, 1st Maritime Security Operations (MSO), supporting operations that are focused on reassuring regional partners of the United States' commitment to security, which promotes stability and global prosperity and 2nd Exercise Arabian Gauntlet 2005, with Navy personnel from 13 countries coordinated aboard  USS Duluth (LPD-6) in Manama, Bahrain, with more than 30,000 people and 19 ships from the United States, Iraq, Pakistan and other coalition and regional allies are using the latest in tactical detection and deterrent measures designed to improve and sharpen Maritime Security Operations (MSO). “Arabian Gauntlet is a multilateral surface, air and mine countermeasure exercise designed to practice maritime security operations with our coalition partners and allies in the region,” said Capt. Hank Miranda, commodore, Destroyer Squadron 50.

 

Ports of call included: Portsmouth, England.

 

CVW-3 Squadrons: VF-32 (*1), F-14B; VMFA-115, FA-18A+; VFA-37, FA-18C(N); VFA-105, FA-18C(N); VAQ-130, EA-6B; VAW-126, E-2C; HS-7, SH-60F / HH-60H; VS-22, S-3B and VRC-40 Det. 1, C-2A.

 

HSTCSG comprises of USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75), Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3, Commander, Cruiser Destroyer Group (CCDG) 2 and Commander, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 26 staffs, guided-missile cruiser USS Monterey (CG-61), guided-missile destroyers USS Mason (DDG-87) and USS Barry (DDG-52), USNS Arctic (T-AOE 8) and attack submarine USS Albuquerque (SSN-706).

 

2005

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

AIR WING

T.C.

DEPART

RETURN

Days at  Sea

USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) - Pacific Fleet, 7th, 5th & Central Command (5th Arabian

/ Persian Gulf dep. & 5th Arabian Sea & 3rd North Arabian Sea  dep.)

10th WestPac JTFEX

10th Indian Ocean

1st MSO

2nd OIF

1st Suez Canal

1st Med

CVW-9

NG

13 Jan 2005

31 Jul 2005

East Coast Transit

2nd World Cruise

Middle East

2nd Iraq War

Persian Gulf

15th FWFD

200-days

World Cruise and Home Port Transfer to the East Coast for Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) at Northrop Grumman's Newport News Shipbuilding

(*1) COMPTUEX (Composite Training Unit Exercise) and JTFEX  (Joint Task Force Exercise) off the coast of Calif., her 1st Maritime Security Operations (MSO), to protect offshore infrastructure, including Iraqi oil platforms, which provide a critical source of income for the new Iraqi government and supporting operations that are focused on reassuring regional partners of the United States’ commitment to security, which promotes stability and global prosperity; to ensure that ships could "operate freely while transiting the world's oceans" during the Global War on Terrorism, on her 2nd Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), the multi-national coalition effort to liberate the Iraqi people, eliminate Iraq's weapons of mass destruction, and end the regime of Saddam Hussein continues, beginning on 20 March 2003 with the firing of Tomahawk missiles from U.S. ships in the Arabian Gulf and Red Sea, operating under operational control of the US Naval Forces Central Command and 5th Fleet.

 

CVW 9 Squadrons: VFA-154, FA-18F; VMFA-323, FA-18C (N); VFA-146, FA-18C; VFA-147, FA-18C; VAQ-138, EA-6B; VAW-112, E-2C; HS-8, SH-60F / HH-60H; VS-33 (*1), S-3B and VRC-30  Det. 4.

 

(*1) Jan.19 - Jan.30: JTFEX off the Southern California operating area.

(*2) VS-33 disestablished on Jun.30, 2006.

 

Air Wing NINE's homeport is NAS Lemoore, CA.  Commander, Carrier Air Wing NINE is assigned to Carrier Group THREE (CCG-3) as the Air Combat Commander for operations at sea with the USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) Strike Group. The strike arm of Air Wing NINE is comprised of eight squadrons: Blue Diamonds of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 146, the Argonauts of VFA-147, the Black Knights of VFA-154, the Death Rattlers of VMFA-323, the Screwbirds of Sea Control Squadron (VS) 33, the Golden Hawks of Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 112, the Yellow Jackets of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAW) 138, the Providers of Carrier Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) 30, and HS-

 

The Carl Vinson Carrier Strike Group includes Carrier Strike Group 3, Carrier Air Wing 9, Destroyer Squadron 31, the guided-missile cruiser USS Antietam (CG-70), the guided-missile destroyers USS O’Kane (DDG-77) and USS Mustin (DDG-89), the fast combat support ship USS Camden (AOE-2), the attack submarine USS Olympia (SSN-717) and Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 11, Detachment 9 deployed with her.


DESRON 31 is homeported in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, and includes USS Chafee (DDG-90), USS Chung-Hoon (DDG-93), USS Crommelin (FFG-37), USS Hopper (DDG-70), USS Paul Hamilton (DDG-60), USS Russell (DDG-59), USS Reuben James (FFG-57) and USS O’Kane (DDG-77). Led by Commodore Capt. Pete Gumataotao, the embarked staff is comprised of several surface warfare officers, a naval aviator, a submarine officer and a handful of enlisted Sailors.

USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) - 2nd, 6th, Central Command & 5th

(2nd North Arabian Sea & 5th Arabian / Persian Gulf dep.)

(11th & 12th Red Sea & 9th & 10th Gulf of Aden)

NoLant

9th Med

13th Suez Canal

2nd OIF

Steel Curtain

1st MSO

3rd OEF

OSC

14th Suez Canal

Med

Aegean Sea

Med

NoLant

CVW-8

AJ

1 Sep 2005

11 Mar 2006

 

 

Europe

Middle East

Iraq no Fly Zone

2nd Iraq War

Afghanistan War

10th FWFD

192-days

2nd Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), the multi-national coalition effort to liberate the Iraqi people, eliminate Iraq's weapons of mass destruction, and end the regime of Saddam Hussein continues, beginning on 20 March 2003 with the firing of Tomahawk missiles from U.S. ships in the Arabian Gulf and Red Sea, 3rd Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), the "military response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, commencing on 7 October 2001, 1st Maritime Security Operations (MSO), Operation Steel Curtain (OSC), an offensive aimed at preventing cells of Al Qaeda from entering Iraq through the Syrian border (Coalition ground forces consisting of 1,000 Iraqi Army Soldiers and 2,500 U.S. Marines began the offensive Nov. 4 near the town of Husaybah near the Iraq/Syria border. Husaybah has become a haven for cells of Al Qaeda entering the country through the Syrian border, according to military officials, and they are describing this as the largest military assault since American-led forces stormed Falluja last year. Aircraft from CVW 8 provided air support for OSC on 6 Nov.ember 2005 by flying reconnaissance and strike missions as required to support troops on the ground during the offensive. As troops were taking fire and buildings in Husaybah were identified as insurgent hotbeds, positions were called in to circling aircraft, which responded to the calls).

 

Ports of call include: Palma de; Naples, Italy; Jebel Ali, UAE; Marmaris, Turkey; Souda Bay, Greece and Corfu, Greece.

 

Squadrons: VF-31 (*1) (F-14D); VF-213 (*2) (F-14D); VFA-15 (F/A-18C); VFA-87 (F/A-18C); VAQ-141 (EA-6B); VAW-124 (E-2C NP); VS-24 (S-3B) and HS-3 (SH/HH-60F/H) -> last operational deployment for the F-14.

 

(*1) VF-31 redesignated VFA-31 in October 2006.
(*2) VF-213 redesignated VFA-213 on Apr.2, 2006.

 

Commanded by Rear Adm. James A. Winnefeld, Jr., commander, Carrier Strike Group 2, TRCSG includes the Norfolk-based aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71), with its embarked air wing, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8; the Norfolk-based guided-missile cruiser USS San Jacinto (CG-56); the Norfolk-based guided-missile destroyers USS Oscar Austin (DDG-79) and USS Donald Cook (DDG-75); the Spanish frigate SPS Alvaro de Bazan (F-101); and the combat logistics ships USNS Mount Baker (T-AE-34) from Naval Weapons Station Earle, N.J., Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Annapolis (SSN-760), and fleet replenishment oiler USNS Kanawha (T-AO-196) from Norfolk, Va.

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS RECORD OF

EAST/WEST COAST TRANSFERS AND TRANSITS

(Panama Canal, Cape Horn, Cape of Good Hope and Suez Canal)

 

Summary Total - September 1945 to Present

 

U. S. Aircraft Carrier Deployments and or both Panama Canal, Cape Horn, Cape of Good Hope and Suez Canal Transits and East /West Coast Transfers

Panama Canal, Cape Horn, Cape of Good Hope and Suez Canal Transits and East Coast/West Coast Transfers

 

Part I of VIII – 1928 to 1945

Part II of VIII – 1946 to 1969

Part III of VIII – 1970 to 1989

Part IV of VIII – 1990 to 1993

Part V of VIII – 1994 to 2000

Part VI of VIII – 2001 to 2005

Part VII of VIII – 2006 to 2012

Part VIII of VIII – 2013 to Present

Panama Canal, Cape Horn, Cape of Good Hope and Suez Canal Transits and East Coast/West Coast Transfers

Part VI of VIII – 2001 to 2005

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIER SHIP

HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619