U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS RECORD OF

EAST/WEST COAST TRANSFERS AND TRANSITS

(Panama Canal, Cape Horn, Cape of Good Hope and Suez Canal)

 

Summary Total - September 1945 to Present

 

U. S. Aircraft Carrier Deployments and or both Panama Canal, Cape Horn, Cape of Good Hope and Suez Canal Transits and East /West Coast Transfers

Panama Canal, Cape Horn, Cape of Good Hope and Suez Canal Transits and East Coast/West Coast Transfers

 

Part I of VIII – 1928 to 1945

Part II of VIII – 1946 to 1969

Part III of VIII – 1970 to 1989

Part IV of VIII – 1990 to 1993

Part V of VIII – 1994 to 2000

Part VI of VIII – 2001 to 2005

Part VII of VIII – 2006 to 2012

Part VIII of VIII – 2013 to Present

 

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

AIR WING

T.C.

DEPART

RETURN

Transit / Transfer

USS Bennington (CV-20) -Pacific Fleet & 2nd

EastPac

2nd Panama Canal

Caribbean Sea

Lant

CVG-82

 

Feb 1946

Mar 1946

Transfer to the East Coast

25-est. days

Home Port Transfer from San Francisco, California to Norfolk, Va.

USS Princeton (CV-37)

Lant Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

 

 

Jun 1946

15 Mar 1947

West Coast Transfer

WestPac

“Following shakedown off Cuba, USS Princeton (CV-37) with Air Group 81 embarked, remained in the Atlantic and operated with the 8th Fleet until June 1946. Then Princeton with CVAG-13 embarked (previously CVG-81 - redesignated 15 November 1946 embarked departed Norfolk, Va. 15 March 1947, on her first voyage to the Caribbean Sea, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet,  making her first Panama Canal transit, steaming through the Eastern Pacific,  on her home port transfer to San Diego, Ca. arriving 31 June 1946 operating with the Pacific Fleet and on 3 July departed on her first “WestPac” deployment. Princeton carried the body of Philippine President Manuel Queson back to Luzon for burial, departing Manila she joined the 7th Fleet in the Marianas, becoming flagship of TF 77, operating in Japanese and Chinese waters during September and October having returned to the Marianas where she remained until February 1947 and headed for maneuvers in Hawaiian waters before returning to San Diego, Ca. (June 1946 to 15 March 1947)” (Ref. 1-Princeton, 72 & 76).

USS Tarawa (CV-40)

Lant Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

CVG-4

T

28 Jun 1946

15 Jul 1946

West Coast Transfer

Voyage

“On 28 June, USS Tarawa (CV-40) exited Hampton Roads, on her West Coast transfer to San Diego, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting the Panama Canal early in July and steamed through the Eastern Pacific to San Diego, Ca. and joined the Pacific Fleet” (28 June to 15 July 1946)” (Ref. 1-Tarawa, 72 & 76).

USS Valley Forge (CV-45)

Lant Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

CVAG-11

V

14 Jul 1947

14 Aug 1947

West Coast Transfer

USS Valley Forge (CV-45) departed Philadelphia on 14 July, headed south, , steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting the Panama Canal on 5 August and steamed through the Eastern Pacific to San Diego, Ca. and joined the Pacific Fleet (14 July to 14 August 1947) (Ref. 1-Valley Forge & 72).

USS Valley Forge (CV-45) - 1st & Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment and Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, voyage

straits of Malacca x 3

1st WestPac

1st Indian Ocean

1st Suez Canal

1st Med

NorLant

Caribbean

2nd Panama Canal

EastPac

CVAG-11

V

9 Oct 1947

11 Jun 1948

World Cruise

Persian Gulf

Following the embarkation of Air Group 11 and intensive air and gunnery training in coastal waters, USS Valley Forge (CV-45), flying the flag of Rear Admiral Harold L. Martin, Commander of Task Force 38, departed San Diego, Ca. 9 October 1947, on her first WestPac and Arabian/Persian Gulf and Indian Ocean deployment during her first World Cruise. The task force devoted almost three months to training operations out of Pearl Harbor before sailing to the Indian Ocean via the straits of Malacca for visit to Australia on 16 January 1948. After a visit to Sydney, the American warships conducted exercises with units of the Royal Australian Navy and then steamed to Hong Kong via the straits of Malacca. During a voyage from the British crown colony to Tsingtao, China, orders arrived directing the task force to return home via the Atlantic. With her escorting destroyers, the ship continued the round-the-world trip departing Hong Kong, she stopped at Manila and Singapore before steaming through the straits of Malacca a third time, en route to Trincomalee, Ceylon; and Ras Tanura before arriving Saudi Arabia. After operating for a time in the Persian Gulf, she traveled through the Arabian Sea, Red Sea and Gulf of Aden, becoming the largest aircraft carrier to transit the Suez Canal, traveling through the Mediterranean Sea, on her first  voyage operating with the 6th Fleet, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 8th Fleet, she made her second Panama Canal transit, steaming through the Eastern Pacific to San Diego, Ca. (9 October 1947 to 11 June 1948) (redesignated CVG-11 on Sep.1, 1948)” (Ref. 1-Valley Forge, 72 & 76).

USS Tarawa (CV-40) - 1st Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment and Red Sea, Gulf of Aden & Indian Ocean voyage

straits of Malacca

1st Yellow Sea

1st South China Sea

1st Suez Canal

1st Med

NoLant

CVG-1

T

28 Sep 1948

21 Feb 1949

World Cruise

Persian Gulf

East Coast Transfer

“After more than 16 months of air operations out of San Francisco and San Diego, USS Tarawa (CV-40) with CVG-1 embarked stood out of San Diego on 28 September 1948 and embarked upon a cruise most of the way around the world on her home port transfer to the east coast, her first World Cruise operating with the Pacific Fleet, her first Yellow Sea, South China Sea, Indian Ocean via straits of Malacca and 1st Arabian Sea/Gulf((Persian Gulf) deployment operating with the 7th Fleet, her first Mediterranean Sea voyage operating with the 6th Fleet via the Gulf of Aden and Red Sea, on her first Suez Canal transit, traveling through the Mediterranean to the North Atlantic, reuniting with her former home port operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 8th Fleet. Tarawa stopped at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii at the end of the second week in October 1948; departing Pearl Harbor, Hawaii at the end of the second week in October 1948 and continued her voyage on to her first foreign port of call, Tsingtao, China in the Yellow Sea., arriving Tsingtao, China in the Yellow Sea on 29 October 1948 and spent the next five weeks observing events in strife-torn northern China. Tarawa was on station in the Yellow Sea from 29 October to early December 1948, while her planes conducted observation flights keeping an eye on events in strife-torn northern China. Early in December 1948, Tarawa headed south for liberty calls at Hong Kong and Singapore; departing Singapore on 23 December 1948 and headed through the straits of Malacca for the newly independent Republic of Ceylon, arriving the capital, Colombo, on 29 December 1948. Departing the newly independent Republic of Ceylon’s capital, Colombo on 2 January 1949, Tarawa steamed toward the Persian Gulf, steaming through Gulf of Oman in the east by the Strait of Hormuz to call at Bahrain and Jeddah before transiting the Suez Canal on the 20th cursing from the Red Sea, Gulf of Aden and Arabian Sea, leaving Port Said departing on the 21st, Tarawa continued her voyage to Greece, Turkey, and Crete. From Soudha Bay, Crete and headed across the Mediterranean Sea on 8 February 1949, stopping overnight at Gibraltar between 12 and 13 February 1949 and then started out across the Atlantic, ending her cruise at Norfolk, Va.” (28 September 1948 to 21 February 1949)” (Ref. 1-Tarawa, 72 & 76).

USS Kearsarge (CV-33)

Lant

SoLant

1st Cape Horn

SoPac

EastPac

 

 

27 Jan 1950

23 Feb 1950

West Coast Transfer

“USS Kearsarge (CV-33) departed Quonset Point, Rhode Island on 27 January 1950, on her first Western and Southern Atlantic and home port transfer to Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington for SCB-27A, around Cape Horn, operating with the United States Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, steaming through the Southern and Eastern Pacific (27 January to 23 February 1950)” (Ref. 1-Kearsarge, 72 & 76).

USS Philippine Sea (CV-47)

Lant Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

 

 

24 May 1950

June 1950

West Coast Transfer

“USS Philippine Sea (CV-47) departed Norfolk, Va., 24 May 1950, on her first reported Panama Canal transit, for her new homeport of San Diego, Ca.., and transferred to the Pacific Fleet, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet (24 May to some time in June 1950)” (Ref. 1-Philippine Sea, 72 & 76).

USS Bataan CVL-29 - 2nd & Pacific Fleet

Lant

Caribbean    3rd Panama Canal

EastPac

 

 

2 Jun 1950

9 Jul 1950

West Coast Transfer

1st FWFD

38 days

USS Bataan (CVL-29) was recommissioned 13 May 1950 at Philadelphia. Home Port transfer to the West Coast for Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Wash. via San Diego, Calif., transiting the Panama Canal and upon arrival in San Diego, Ca., loaded Air Force cargo and personnel (VMF-212 (LD), VMF-312 (WR) and HU-1 Det 8 (UP)) and departed 16 November 1950 for Tokyo Bay. She arrived in Korean waters 15 December and until June 1951 her aircraft flew strikes in support of the ground forces. Bataan departed for the west coast 2 June 1951 and after a brief stop at San Diego on 25 June 1951, steamed to Bremerton, Wash., 9 July for overhaul (16 November 1950 to 9 July 1951)” (Ref. 1-Bataan, 72 & 76).

USS Leyte (CV-32) -

1st Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, Arabian Sea & IO voyage

straits of Malacca

1st WestPac

Panama Canal

Cape Horn or

Suez Canal x 2?

Med?

CVG-3

K

6 Sep 1950

3 Feb 1951

Korea War

“USS Leyte (CV-32) with (CVG-3) embarked, departed Norfolk, Virginia 6 September 1950, on her first “Westpac” deployment, transiting the Panama Canal via the Caribbean Sea or around Cape Horn, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet into the Eastern Pacific Ocean, or Suez Canal transit from the Mediterranean Sea operating with the 6th Fleet, to the Red Sea, and Arabian Sea into the Indian Ocean through the straits of Malacca into the South China Sea to the Sea of Japan or Yellow Sea, under the direction of the 7th Fleet in the Western Pacific to join TF 77 in the Far East to support United Nations Forces in Korea, on her first Korea Combat cruise, arriving Sasebo, Japan, 8 October 1950. Leyte made final preparations for combat operations and  her aircraft spent 92 days at sea and flew 3,933 sorties against the North Korean aggressors (9 October through 19 January 1951), during which time her pilots accumulated 11,000 hours in the air while inflicting massive damage upon enemy positions, supplies, transportation, and communications, making her first line period 9-29 Oct 1950; her second line period 5-30 Nov 1950; her third line period  USS Leyte (CV 32) with CVG-3 embarked - 1-26 Dec 1950; and her fourth and final line period 7-19 Jan 1951, resulting in the loss of one pilot, when Ensign Jesse L. Brown, the Navy's first black pilot, flying a close support mission from Leyte was forced to make a crash landing near Hagaru-Ri when his plane was hit by enemy ground fire on 4 December 1950. Observing that Ens. Brown was unable to get out of his cockpit, one of his squadron mates, Lt.(j.g.) Thomas J. Hudner, fearlessly landed to assist. Ens. Brown died before he could be removed from the wreckage. Lt.(j.g.) Hudner was rescued by helicopter and later was awarded the Medal of Honor. Ens. Brown was posthumously decorated with the Distinguished Flying Cross; returning home either from the Sea of Japan or Yellow Sea into the Western and Pacific to the Panama Canal into the Caribbean Sea or to the Southern Pacific around Cape Horn to the Southern Atlantic, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet and or steaming through the Indian Ocean to the Arabian Sea, Gulf of Aden and Red Sea, transiting the Suez Canal into the Mediterranean Sea, operating with the 6th Fleet, to the Atlantic on her way home (6 September 1950 to 3 February 1951)” (Ref. 1-Leyte, 72 & 76).

USS Hornet (CVA-12), former CV-12

EastPac

1st Panama Canal

Caribbean

SoLant

 

 

10 Apr 1951

30 Apr 1951

East Coast Transfer

“USS Hornet (CV-12) was recommissioned 20 March 1951 and 10 April 1951 sailed from San Francisco, steaming through the Eastern Pacific to the Panama Canal, traveling through the Caribbean Sea and Atlantic, on her transfer to New York Naval Shipyard for a SCB-27A modernization, making her first deployment since her recommission (10 April  to 30 April 1951)”  (Ref. 1-Hornet, 72 & 76).

USS Ticonderoga (CV-14)

EastPac

SoPac

1st Cape Horn

SoLant

 

 

27 Feb 1952

1 Apr 1952

East Coast Transfer

On 31 January 1952, USS Ticonderoga (CV-14) came out of reserve and went into reduced commission for the transit from Bremerton to New York, traveling through the Eastern and Southern Pacific around Cape Horn to the Southern Atlantic. She departed Puget Sound on 27 February and reached New York on 1 April. Three days later, she was decommissioned at the New York Naval Shipyard to begin an extensive conversion (27 February to 1 April 1952)” (Ref. 1-Wasp, 72 & 76).

USS Intrepid (CV-11)

EastPac

2nd Panama Canal

Caribbean

SoLant

 

 

 

9 Apr 1952

East Coast Transfer

“USS Intrepid (CV-11) shifted to San Francisco Bay 4 February 1948. Her status was reduced to "in commission in reserve" 15 August before decommissioning 22 March 1947 and joining the Pacific Reserve Fleet. USS Intrepid (CV-11) shifted to San Francisco Bay 4 February 1948. Her status was reduced to "in commission in reserve" 15 August before decommissioning 22 March 1947 and joining the Pacific Reserve Fleet. USS Intrepid (CV-11) recommissioned at San Francisco 9 February 1952 and got underway 12 March 1952 for Norfolk, Va., steaming through the Eastern Pacific to the Panama Canal, traveling through the Caribbean Sea to Norfolk Naval Shipyard, where she decommissioned 9 April 1952 for conversion to a modern attack aircraft carrier. She decommissioned in the Norfolk Naval Shipyard 9 April 1952 for conversion to a modern attack aircraft carrier. Reclassified CVA-11 1 October 1952. Two days later she went into full commission as a unit of the Atlantic Fleet 12 March to 9 April 1952)” (Ref. 1-Intrepid, 72 & 76).

USS Oriskany (CV-34)

Caribbean

Solant

1st Cape Horn

SoPac

EastPac

 

 

16 May 1952

21 Jul 1952

West Coast Transfer

“USS Oriskany (CV-34) departed New York Naval Shipyard, 16 May 1952, on her transfer to the Pacific Fleet via Norfolk, Virginia, where loaded ammunition 19-22 May 1952 and upon completion of her overhaul at New York Naval Shipyard, 15 May 1952, that included the installation of a new flight deck, steering system, and bridge (commencing after 6 November 1951), she steamed via Guantanamo Bay, traveling through the Southern Atlantic to Rio de Janeiro around Cape Horn to Valparaiso and Lima through the Southern and Eastern Pacific prior to arriving San Diego, Calif. (16 May  to 21 July 1952)” (Ref. 1-Oriskany, 72 & 76).

USS Antietam (CV-36) - 1st 2nd

EastPac

2nd Panama Canal

Lant

 

 

mid Aug 1952

Sep 1952

Transfer to the East Coast

4th FWFD

30-est.days

“USS Antietam (CV-36) remained in reserve at Alameda, Calif., until communist forces from the north invaded South Korea in the summer of 1950. She began reactivation preparations on 6 December and went back into commission on 17 January 1951, Capt. George J. Dufek in command. Initially, the carrier conducted shakedown training and carrier qualifications along the California coast, first out of Alameda and, after 14 May 1951, out of San Diego. She made one voyage to Pearl Harbor and back to San Diego in July and August before departing the latter port on 8 September and heading for the Far East. Antietam arrived in the Far East later that fall and, by late November, began the only combat deployment of her career. During that tour, she made four cruises with Task Force (TF) 77, in the combat zone off the coast of Korea. In between fighting assignments, she returned to Yokosuka, Japan. During each of those periods, her air group carried out a variety of missions in support of United Nations forces combating North Korean aggression. Those missions included combat air patrol logistics interdiction — particularly against railroad and highway traffic — reconnaissance antisubmarine patrols, and night heckler missions. Between late November 1951 and mid-March 1952, Antietam's air group flew nearly 6,000 sorties of all types. She returned to Yokosuka on 21 March 1952 at the conclusion of her fourth cruise with TF 77 to begin preparations for her voyage back to the United States. The aircraft carrier returned home in April and rejoined the Pacific Reserve Fleet briefly. Antietam was reactivated later that summer and, in August, transited the Panama Canal to join the Atlantic Fleet. In September 1952, the warship entered the New York Naval Shipyard for major alterations. In October, she was redesignated an attack aircraft carrier, CVA-36. In December 1952, Antietam emerged from the yard as America's first angled-deck aircraft carrier (August to September 1952)”” (Ref. 1-Antietam, 72 & 76).

USS Shangri-la (CVA-38)

Caribbean

2nd Panama Canal

EastPac

 

 

Oct 1952

Nov 1952

East Coast Transfer

“USS Shangri-la (CVA-38) returned to Puget Sound Naval Ship Yard, Bremerton, Washington in the fall of 952 for SCB-27C via the Panama Canal, on her first Southern Atlantic and Easter Pacific deployment operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet. Shangri-La recommissioned on 10 May 1951, Capt. Francis L. Busey in command. For the next year, she conducted training and readiness operations out of Boston, Mass. Reclassified an attack aircraft carrier, CVA-38, in 1952, she traveled  to the Caribbean through the Panama Canal for modernization at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard that fall and decommissioned again on 14 November 1952. During the two year overhaul, she received an angled flight deck, twin steam catapults, and her aircraft elevators and arresting gear were overhauled. At a cost of approximately $7 million, she was virtually a new ship when she commissioned for the third time on 10 January 1955, Capt. Roscoe L. Newman commanding” (Ref. 1-Shangri-la).

USS Lake Champlain (CV-39) -

1st & 2nd Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, Arabian Sea & IO voyage

straits of Malacca

1st NoLant

1st Med

1st & 2nd

Suez Canal

1st Combat Cruise & 1st Korea Peace Keeping Cruise

1st WestPac

CVG-4

 

 

F

26 Apr 1953

4 Dec 1953

Korea

 

After shakedown in Cuban and Haitian waters, 25 November through 25 December 1952, USS Lake Champlain (CVA-39) with CVG-4 embarked departed Mayport, Fla. 26 April 1953, on her first Northern Atlantic voyage operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the Fleet, on her first Mediterranean Sea voyage operating with the 6th Fleet, on her first  “Westpac” deployment operating with the 7th Fleet and her first Korea Combat cruise in the Yellow Sea or Sea of Japan; becoming the largest ship to transit the Suez Canal up to that time from the Mediterranean Sea to the Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, Persian Gulf/Arabian Sea to the Indian Ocean, steaming through the straits of Malacca prior to mooring at Yokosuka, Japan on 9 June 1953. Lake Champlain sailed from Yokosuka Japan on 11 June 1953 as flagship of Carrier Task Force 77 during the Korean Conflict/War, arriving off western Korea 14 June 1953, and upon arrival her air group immediately launched sorties cratering runways; assaulting enemy troops; attacking trenches, bunkers, gun positions; and giving close air support to hard pressed ground forces while her planes also escorted B-29 bombers on their way to enemy targets (Action Report (11-29 Jun 1953, Part 1) and Action Report (11-29 Jun 1953, Part 2)), continuing to strike at the enemy until the truce was signed 27 July 1953; Action Report 11-27 Jul 1953), remaining off the Korean coast after the truce until relieved by USS Kearsarge (CVA-33) on 11 October 1953, at which time she headed toward the South China Sea, arriving Singapore on 24 October 1953 and upon conclusion of a port visit, steamed through the straits of Malacca to the Indian Ocean, visiting Colombo prior to entering the Persian Gulf/Arabian Sea, steaming through the Gulf of Aden and Sea, transiting the Suez Canal a second time, touching at Port Said and entered the Mediterranean Sea on her second voyage, steaming to Cannes, and Lisbon, the latter along the Atlantic Ocean coast at the point where the river Tagus flows into the Atlantic before arriving Mayport, Fla. (26 April to 4  December 1953)” (Ref. 1-Lake Champlain, 72 & 76).

USS Wasp (CVA-18)

Lant

Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

1st WestPac

1st Korea Peace Keeping Cruise

Sea of Japan Philippine Sea

CVG-17

R

16 Sep 1953

1 May 1954

World Cruise West Coast Transfer

On 7 November 1952, USS Wasp (CVA-18) entered the New York Naval Shipyard to commence a seven-month yard period (Nov.7, 1952 - Jun. 1953) to prepare her for a world cruise which was to bring her into the Pacific Fleet once more. After refresher training in the Caribbean, USS Wasp (CVA-18) with CVG-17 embarked departed Norfolk, Va. on 16 September 1953, on her Round-the-World” cruise, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet via the Panama Canal in the Caribbean Sea, her second voyage to the Caribbean Sea, to operate with the Pacific Fleet and tour with the 7th Fleet in the Sea of Japan and Philippine Sea, watching over the uneasy truce in Korea, on her first Peace Keeping cruise, Traveling through the Southern Atlantic around Cape Horn through the Southern and Eastern Pacific, crossing the Pacific, Wasp made a brief visit to Japan and then conducted strenuous operations with the famed TF 77. While operating in the western Pacific, she made port calls at Hong Kong, Manila, Yokosuka, and Sasebo., during which time China's Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek spent more than four hours on board watching simulated air war maneuvers in Formosan waters on 10 January 1954 and President Ramon Magsaysay of the Republic of the Philippines came on board to observe air operations as a guest of American Ambassador Raymond A. Spruance on 12 March 1954, followed by operations out of Subic Bay, Philippines, for a time, then sailed for Japan where, in April 1954, she was relieved by USS Boxer (CVA-21) and sailed for her new home port of San Diego, Calif. (16 September 1953 to 1 May 1954)” (Ref. 1-Wasp, 72 & 76).

USS Valley Forge (CVA-45)

EastPac

3rd Panama Canal

Caribbean

Lant

 

 

Oct 1953

 

East Coast Transfer

“USS Valley Forge (CVA-45) air groups dropped some 3,700 tons of bombs on the enemy before the ship left the Korean coast and returned to San Diego on 25 June 1953. After a west-coast overhaul, USS Valley Forge (CVA-45) departed San Diego, California in October 1953 as a guess, on her fourth reported voyage in the Caribbean Sea, steaming through the Eastern Pacific via her third Panama Canal transit, into the Caribbean Sea, her first as a deployment and transfer from the Pacific Fleet to the Atlantic Fleet, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Norfolk Naval Shipyard where she will be refitted for her new duties as a antisubmarine warfare support carrier” (Ref. 1-Valley Forge, 72 & 76).

USS Saipan (CVL-48) - 2nd  & 7th

Lant

Caribbean Sea

Panama Canal

EastPac

1st WestPac

Suez Canal

Med

Lant

VMA-324

 

Oct 1953

20 Jul 1954

3rd FWFD

293 est.-days

1st Korea Peace-Keeping Cruise

 

Ports of call included: San Diego, Calif.; Pearl Harbor, Yokosuka and Sasebo, Japan.

USS Tarawa (CVA-40) -

2nd  Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, Arabian Sea & IO voyage

straits of Malacca

Lant

4th Med

2nd Suez Canal & 2nd Panama Canal        1st Korea Peace Keeping

Cruise

CVG-3

K

12 Nov 1953

19 Aug 1954

2nd World Cruise

Korea

USS Tarawa (CVA-40)with CVG-3 embarked departed Norfolk, Va. 12 November 1953, on her second World Cruise, her fourth Northern Atlantic voyage operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, her fourth Mediterranean Sea voyage while two were deployments, operating with the 6th Fleet, making her second Suez Canal transit, but long after the July 1953 armistice had ended hostilities, steaming from the Red Sea through the Gulf of Aden and Arabian Sea into the Indian Ocean, steaming through the straits of Malacca prior to reaching the South China Sea on her second voyage, her first Sea of Japan deployment and second voyage, on her first Korea Peace Keeping cruise watching over the uneasy truce, following the Korea Conflict/War and after her tour with the 7th Fleet in the Asiatic war zone in the spring of 1954, steamed from the Western Pacific to the Eastern Pacific to the Panama Canal to the Caribbean Sea, on her third reported voyage plus several not reported, her second Panama Canal transit, heading north through the Atlantic for home (12 November 1953 to 6 September 1954)” (Ref. 1-Tarawa, 72 & 76).

USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVA-42)

SoLant

1st Cape Horn

SoPac

EastPac

 

 

7 Jan 1954

5 Mar 1954

West Coast Transfer

“Assigned to extensive conversion at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington, USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVA-42) sailed from Norfolk, Va. 7 January 1954. Too large to pass through the Panama Canal, she traveled through the Southern Atlantic around Cape Horn through the Southern and Eastern and Pacific, arriving at the shipyard 5 March. She was decommissioned there 23 April 1954 (7 January to 5 March 1954)” (Ref. 1-Franklin D. Roosevelt, 72 & 76).

USS Wright (CVL-49)

SoLant   Carib

Panama Canal

EastPac

1st WestPac

Marine Attack Squadron 211

 

5 Apr 1954

31 Oct 1954

Home Port Transfer to the West Coast

South America

4th FWFD

210-days

Home Port Transfer from Davisville, Rhode Island to San Diego, California

1st Korea Peace Keeping Cruise

 

Marine Attack Squadron 211 embarked in San Diego, California.

USS Hornet (CVA-12) - 1st Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, Arabian Sea & IO voyage

straits of Malacca

Norlant voyage

1st Med voyage

1st Suez Canal

1st WestPac

CVG-9

N

11 May 1954

12 Dec 1954

World Cruise

West Coast Transfer

“USS Hornet (CVA-12) with CVG-9 embarked departed Norfolk, Va. 11 May 1954, on her eight-month global cruise and home port transfer to San Francisco, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet in the Atlantic, cruising to the Mediterranean Sea conducting operations, operating with the 6th Fleet prior to transiting the Suez Canal for the first time, steaming through the Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, and Arabian Sea into the Indian Ocean, steaming through the straits of Malacca, arriving in the South China Sea, joining the mobile 7th fleet in the South China Sea, where on the 25th of July, search planes from her task group shot down two attacking Chinese Communist fighter planes, and covered the evacuation of Vietnamese from the Communist controlled north to freedom in South Vietnam, then ranged from Japan to Formosa, Okinawa, and the Philippines in readiness training with the 7th fleet and upon conclusion of duty with the 7th Fleet, Hornet steamed to her new home port through the Western and Eastern Pacific” (11 May to 12 December 1954)” (Ref. 1-Hornet, 72 & 76).

USS Midway (CVA-41) - 2nd & 6th

SoLant

1st Cape of Good Hope

1st IO

WestPac

CVG-1

T

27 Dec 1954

14 Jul 1955

West Coast Transfer

13th FWFD

200-days

Norfolk, Va transfer to Puget Sound Naval Ship yard on her 1st World Cruise

 

Ports of call included: Capetown, the provincial capital and primate city of the Western Cape; Colombo has many canals and the Northern and North-Eastern border of the city of Colombo is formed by the Kelani River, which meets the sea in a part of the city known as the Modera (mōdara in Sinhala) which means river delta and is the largest city and the commercial, industrial and cultural capital of Sri Lanka, located on the west coast of the island and adjacent to Sri Jayawardenapura Kotte suburb or the parliament capital of Sri Lanka and is also the administrative capital of Western Province, Sri Lanka and the district capital of Colombo District; Ceylon, an island country in the northern Indian Ocean off the southern coast of the Indian subcontinent in South Asia, has maritime borders with India to the northwest and the Maldives to the southwest; Singaporee, officially the Republic of Singapore, is a Southeast Asian island city-state off the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula, 137 kilometres (85 mi) north of the equator (An island country made up of 63 islands, it is separated from Malaysia by the Straits of Johor to its north and from Indonesia's Riau Islands by the Singapore Strait to its south); British Malaya loosely described a set of states on the Malay Peninsula and the island of Singapore that were brought under British control between the 18th and the 20th centuries; Manila, the capital city of the Philippines, is one of the sixteen cities (along with the municipality of Pateros) that comprise the national capital region called Metro Manila, located on the eastern shore of Manila Bay and is bordered by the cities of Navotas and Caloocan to the north; Quezon City to the northeast; San Juan and Mandaluyong to the east, Makati to the southeast, and Pasay to the south; Yokosuka, Japan, a city in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, covering an area of 100.7 km² and is the 11th most populous city in Greater Tokyo, 12th in the Kantō region and Pearl, Harbor, Hawaii.

 

Commander, Carrier Division Three and Commander, Carrier Air Group Six (CVG-1) embarked Midway.

 

Squadrons: VF-101, F2H-2; VF-12 (*1), F2H-2; VF-174, F9F-6 (F-9F); VA-15, AD-6 (A-1H); VC-4 Det. 35, F2H-4 (F-2D); VC-12 Det. 35 (*2), AD-4W; VC-33 Det. 35 (*3), AD-5N (A-1G); VC-62 Det. 35 (*4), F2H-2P and HU-2 Det., HUP-2 (UH-25B). (*1) VF-12 redesignated VA-12 on Aug.1, 1955; (*2) VC-12 redesignated VAW-12 on Jul.2, 1956; (*3) VC-33 redesignated VA(AW)-33 on Jul.2, 1956 and (*4) VC-62 redesignated VFP-62 on Jul.2, 1956.

USS Bennington (CVA-20)

SoLant

1st Cape Horn

SoPac

EastPac

 

 

8 Sep 1955

20 Oct 1955

West Coast Transfer

“USS Bennington (CVA-20) departed Mayport, Florida 8 September 1955, on her first Southern Atlantic and Easter Pacific deployment operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, traveling through the Southern Atlantic around Cape Horn through the Southern and Eastern Pacific to San Diego, Calif., where she operated with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet (8 September  to October 1955)” (Ref. 1-Bennington, 72, 387 & 76).

USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVA-42)

EastPac

SoPac

2nd Cape Horn

Solant

 

 

Jun 1956

July 1956

East Coast Transfer

“USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVA-42) departed Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington June 1956, upon completion of her 1st modernization, SCB 110A conversion ordered for all three Midway Class Carriers, traveling through the Eastern and Southern Pacific on her second time around the Cape Horn, steaming through the South Atlantic, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet back to her home port of Norfolk, Virginia (June to July 1956)” (Ref. 76A).

USS Wasp (CVA-18)

EastPac

SoPac

1st Cape Horn

Solant

Caribbean

Lant

 

 

Jan 1957

21 Mar 1957

East Coast Transfer

“USS Wasp (CVA-18) left San Diego, Ca. on the last day of January 1957, traveling through the Eastern and Southern Pacific around Cape Hornto the South Atlantic, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, for operations in the South Atlantic and Caribbean Sea, then proceeded to Boston where she arrived on 21 March. The carrier came into Norfolk, Va., on 6 April to embark members of her crew from the Antisubmarine Warfare School. The carrier spent the next few months in tactics along the eastern seaboard and in the waters off Bermuda before returning to Boston on 16 August (January to 21 March 1957)” (Ref. 1-Wasp, 72 & 76).

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43)

Solant

1st Cape Horn

SoPac

EastPac

 

 

26 Feb 1957

15 Apr 1957

West Coast Transfer

“USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) departed Norfolk, Va. 26 February 1957, on her first Southern Atlantic, cruise around Cape Horn, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, with Captain Jaap, Jasper A. USNA in command, steaming through the Southern and Easter Pacific to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington for her first modernization, SCB 110A conversion ordered for all three Midway-class carriers, making port of calls at  Santos, Brazil; Valparaiso, Chile; and Balboa, Canal Zone, C.Z.; completing nine tours of duty in the Mediterranean Sea operating with the 6 th Fleet (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956); reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 1 October 1952. Her 11th deployment ended (26 February to 24 May 1957) since her commission 1 October 1947” (Ref. 1- Coral Sea, 34, 72 & 76).

USS Ticonderoga (CVA-14)

Solant

2nd Cape Horn

SoPac

EastPac

 

 

25 Apr 1957

30 May 1957

West Coast Transfer

“On 2 August 1956, USS Ticonderoga (CVA-14) returned to Norfolk, Va. and entered the shipyard to receive an angled flight deck and an enclosed hurricane bow (SCB-125). Those modifications were completed by early 1957 and, 25 April 1957, she got underway for her new home port, traveling through the Southern Atlantic around Cape Horn through the Southern and Eastern Pacific to Alameda, Calif. and upon arrival, underwent repairs, and finished out the summer with operations off the California coast (April  to 30 May 1957)” (Ref. 1-Ticonderoga, 72 & 76).

USS Essex (CVA-9)

EastPac

SoPac

1st Cape Horn

Solant

 

 

21 Jun 1957

1 Aug 1957

East Coast Transfer

 

USS Essex (CVA-9) departed San Diego, Ca., 21 June 1957, steaming to Mayport, Florida, traveling through the Eastern and Southern Pacific around Cape Horn to the Southern Atlantic, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet (21 June to 1 August 1958)” (Ref. 1-Essex, 72 & 76).

USS Essex (CVA-9) - 6th & 7th - 1st Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, Arabian Sea & IO voyage via straits of Malacca

1st Med Suez Canal transit x 2 1st IO

6th WestPac

ATG-201

J&AP

2 Feb 1958

17 Nov 1958

Beirut, Lebanon

USS Essex (CVA-9) with ATG-201 embarked departed Mayport, Florida 2 February 1958, on her first Northern Atlantic voyage operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the Fleet, on her first Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the 6th Fleet, on her first  “Westpac” deployment operating with the 7th Fleet in the Far East, arriving the eastern Mediterranean in May 1958, she operated there until alerted to the Middle East crisis on 14 July 1958; immediately there after steaming to the area in support the U.S. Peace Force landing in Beirut, Lebanon, launching reconnaissance and patrol missions until 20 August, when she was ordered to proceed to Asian waters, transiting the Suez Canal for the first time from the Mediterranean Sea to the Red Sea, Gulf of Aden and Arabian Sea in to the Indian Ocean, steaming through the straits of Malacca to arriving in the Taiwan operational area where she joined TF 77 in conducting flight operations before steaming through the Western and Eastern Pacific, heading to the Southern Pacific, rounding Cape Horn, steaming through the Southern Pacific on her way back to Mayport, Florida operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet (2 February to 17 November 1958)” (Ref. 1- Essex, 72 & 76).

USS Ranger (CVA-61)

SoLant

SoPac

Cape Horn

EastPac

CVG-14

NK

20 Jun 1958

20 Aug 1958

Transfer to the West Coast

2nd FWFD

62-days

200 Naval Reserve officer candidates embarked, transferring to the Pacific Fleet at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California from Norfolk, Virginia.

 

Ports of call included: Port of Spain, Trinidad; Rio de Janeiro, Brasilia; Callao, Peru; Valparaiso, Chile and Acapulco, Mexico.

 

Squadrons: VF-144 (*1), F9F-8 (F-9J); VA-145, AD-6 (A-1H); VA-146, FJ-4B (AF-1E); VA-116, FJ-4B (AF-1E); VAH-6, A3D-2 (A-3B); VAW-11 Det. F, AD-5W (EA-1E); VA(AW)-35 Det. F, AD-5N (A-1G); VFP-61 Det. F, F9F-8 (F-9J) and HU-2 Det., HUP-2 (UH-25B).

 

(*1) redesignated VA-52 Feb.23, 1959.

USS Boxer (CVS-21) -

Pacific & 2nd

EastPac

2nd Panama Canal

Caribbean Sea

Lant

 

 

14 Oct  1958

1 Nov 1958

Transfer to the East Coast

14th FWFD

19-days

Home port Transfer to Norfolk, Va.

USS Shangri-la (CVA-38)

EastPac

SoPac

1st Cape Horn

Solant

 

 

16 Mar 1960

27 Apr 1960

East Coast Transfer

“USS Shangri-la (CVA-38) with no embarked CVG departed San Diego, California 16 March 1960, on her first Eastern and Southern Pacific and Southern Atlantic cruise around Cape Horn operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, visiting Callao, Peru; Valparaiso, Chile, during which time suffers an explosion of an air separator operated by a gasoline motor while off Valparaiso, Chile on 7 April 1960, injuring three, followed by visits to Port of Spain, Trinidad; Bayonne, New Jersey; and Norfolk, Virginia prior to her arrival at her new home port Mayport, Florida (16 March to 27 April 1960)” (Ref. 1-Shangri-la, 72 & 76).

USS Kitty Hawk (CVA-63) - 2nd & 1st

WestLant

Caribbean

SoLant

1st Cape Horn

SoPac

EastPac

CVG-11

V

11 Aug 1961

1 Nov 1961

South America

West Coast Transfer

1st FWFD

Shakedown Cruise and Home Port Transfer to the West Coast, conducting Operations in the Caribbean Sea off Naval Station (NS) Guantánamo Bay, Cuba and South America en route to the Pacific.

 

Ports of call included:  Trinidad (Spanish: "Trinity") is the larger and more populous of the two major islands and numerous landforms which make up the island nation of Trinidad and Tobago. It is the southernmost island in the Caribbean and lies just 11 km (6.8 mi) off the northeastern coast of Venezuela. With an area of 4,768 km2 (1,841 sq mi) it is also the fifth largest in the West Indies; Rio de Janeiro, (/ˈr di ʒəˈnɛər, -d ʒə-/; Portuguese pronunciation: [ˈʁi.u dʒi ʒɐˈnejɾu],[2] January River), commonly referred to as simply Rio,[3] is the capital city of the State of Rio de Janeiro, the second largest city of Brazil, and the third largest metropolitan area and agglomeration in South America; Valparaiso Bay (/ˌvælpəˈrz/, Spanish: [balpaɾaˈiso]) is a major city, seaport, and educational center commune in Chile. Greater Valparaíso is the third largest metropolitan area in the country. Valparaíso is located 69.5 miles (111.8 km) northwest of Santiago[3] and is one of the South Pacific's most important seaports. Valparaíso is the capital of Chile's third most populated administrative region and has been the headquarters for the Chilean National Congress since 1990 (Santiago (Spanish pronunciation: [san̪ˈtja.ɣo]), also Santiago de Chile [san̪ˈtja.ɣo ðe ˈtʃi.le] ( listen), is the capital and largest city of Chile and the center of its largest conurbation. It is located in the country's central valley, at an elevation of 520 m (1,706 ft) above mean sea level) and Lima /ˈlmə/ on 16 October 1961. the capital and the largest city of Peru. It is located in the valleys of the Chillón, Rímac and Lurín rivers, in the central coastal part of the country, overlooking the Pacific Ocean (Callao, Peru (El Callao (/kɑːˈj/) on 16 October 1961, located west of Lima, the country's Capital, also called Provincia Constitucional (Constitutional Province), the only province of the Callao Region; Spanish pronunciation: [kaˈʎa.o] or [kaˈʝa.o]) is the chief seaport of Peru)

 

Squadrons: VF-142, F8U-1P (RF-8A; VA-113, A4D-2N (A-4C); VA-115, AD-6 (A-1H); VAH-13, A3D-2 (A-3B); VAW-11 Det. C, WF-2 (E-1B); VFP-63 Det. C, F8U-1P (RF-8A) and HU-1 Det. C, HUP-2 (UH-25B).

USS Lexington (CVA-16)

EastPac

SoPac

1st Cape Horn

Solant

Westlant

CVG-5

NF

21 Jul 1962

11 Sep 1962

East Coast Transfer

 “USS Lexington (CVA-16) with CVG-5 embarked departed San Diego, Calif. 21 July 1962, on her Eastern/Southern, operating with the Pacific Fleet and Southern/Western Atlantic deployment and change of home port around Cape Horn, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet. Only two squadrons from CVG-5 were aboard CVA-16 during her homeport change and transit from the Pacific to the Atlantic, joining forces with the 6th Fleet, arriving 11 September 1962” (Ref. 1-Lexington, 72 & 76).

USS Constellation (CVA-64) - 2nd & Pacific Fleet

WestLant SoLant

1st Cape Horn

SocPac

EastPac

*CVG-5

NF

25 Jul 1962

17 Sep 1962

South America

Transfer to the West Coast

2nd FWFD

55-days

USS Constellation (CVA-64) (Connie) departed Norfolk, Va. 25 July 1962, on her two-month trip and home port transfer operating with the United States Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, steaming in the Western Atlantic to Mayport, Fla., where she embarked some squadrons from CVG-5 and steamed through the Southern Atlantic around Cape Horn, steaming in the Eastern and Southern Pacific to her new home port of San Diego, Calif., arriving 17 September 1962, operating with the Pacific Fleet ((CVA-64 and CVA-16 embarked CVG-5 in 1962 at the same time. Only some squadrons from CVG-5 were aboard CVA-64 and CVA-16) (25 July 1962 to 17 September 1962)” (Ref. 1-Constellation & 72).

 

Home port transfer to the West Coast

 

Ports of call include: Spaing, Trinid; Rio De Janeiro; Valparaiso, Chile; Balboa and Acapulco, Mexico.

 

CVA-64 and CVA-16 embarked CVG-5 in 1962 at the same time. Only some squadrons from CVG-5 were aboard CVA-64 and CVA-16.

 

Squadrons: VF-51, YF8U-2NE (YF-8E); VA-56, A4D-2 (A-4B); VA-55, A4D-2N (A-4C); VAH-10 Det. B, A3D-2 (A-3B); VFP-63 Det. B, F8U-1P (RF-8A) and HU-2 Det. 64, HUP-2 (UH-25B).

USS Wright (CC-2), former AVT-7 & CVL-49

EastPac

2nd Panama Canal Caribbean Sea

Lant

Command ship

Command ship

 

21 Dec 1963

Home Port Transfer to the East Coast

South America

5th FWFD

26-days

Home Port Transfer from Seattle, Washington via San Diego, California to Norfolk, Va.

 

“USS Wright (CC-2/AVT-7former CVL-49 (CC-2 - taken to the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington for conversion to a command ship (15/03/62 to 11/05/63)).

USS Enterprise CVA(N)-65) - 2nd, 7th, Pacific, 6th & 2nd - 1st straits of Malacca

Solant

1st Cape of Good Hope

Indian Ocean

South China Sea WestPac

EastPac

SoPac

1st Cape Horn

Solant

Norlant

CVW-6

AE

8 Feb 1964

3 Oct 1964

World Cruise

"Sea Orbit"

5th FWFD

239-Days

United States Navy's Task Force One “Operation Sea Orbit

Reminiscent of the cruise of the Great White Fleet in 1907-09, an historic 65-day, 30,216 to 30,565 mile (49,190 km) voyage around the world, to demonstrate the ability of nuclear powered ships to operate free from the usual ties to shore bases,  on her first World Cruise, transiting the Atlantic eastbound under the command of TF 25, conducting Navy Technical Proficiency Inspection (NTPI), on her first World cruise and was Flagship of the United States Navy's Task Force One Operation Sea Orbitfrom 31 July 1964 to 3 October 1964.

 

Ports of call include: An unqualified success, the operation proved to people the world over the tremendous increase in capabilities nuclear power brings the Navy. The full itinerary comprised Rabat, Morocco, during which time Enterprise conducted her first Fire Power Demonstration for visitors from Morocco; Dakar, Senegal; Abidjan, Ivory Coast; Istanbul, Turkey; Cannes, France; Naples, Italy; Genoa; Cannes, France; Pollensa Bay, Mallorca; Rade de Salins, France; Cannes, France; Genoa; Palermo, Italy; Palma, Mallorca; Naples, Italy; Pollensa Bay, Mallorca; Freetown, Sierra Leone; Monrovia, Liberia; Nairobi, Kenya; Karachi, West Pakistan; Freemantle, Melbourne, and Sydney in Australia; Wellington, New Zealand; Buenos Aires, Argentina; Montevideo, Uruguay; Santos, Rio De Janeiro and Recife in Brazil; Baía de Guanabara, Rio de Janeiro and San Juan, Puerto Rico.

 

CVGs were redesignated CVWs changed on 20 December 1963. CVW-1 Squadrons and planes consisted of the McDonnell-Douglas Phantom II Jet Fighters of VF-102 “Diamondbacks” (F-4B) and VF-33 “Tarsiers” (F-8E), while Attack Squadrons used Douglas Skyhawk Jet Attack Bombers of VA-66 “Waldos” (A-4C); VA-64 “Black Lancers” (A-4C) and VA-76 “Spirits” (A-4C), while VA-65 “Tigers” flew A-1H Douglas Skyraider Attack Fighter; Heavy Attack Squadron VAH-7 (RVAH-7 on Dec.1, 1964) “Peacemakers of the Fleet” flying North American Vigilante Jet Attack A3J-1 (A-5A); Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron VAW-12 Det. 65 “Bats” flying Grumman Tracer “Willy Fudd” E-1B; Light Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron VFP-62 Det. 65 “Fighting Photos” flying Vought Crusader Jet Fighter Reconnaissance RF-8A / RF-8A (F8U-1P)Crusader RF-8G Crusader and Helicopter Utility Squadron HU-2 Det. 65 “Fleet Angels” flying Kaman Seasprite Transport (Utility) UH-2A. In 1964 VF-33 transitioned to the McDonnell F-4 Phantom II (F-8E) and would fly the Phantom F-8E alongside its sister squadron VF-102 flying F-4B’s. The squadron was deployed aboard the first nuclear powered aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVAN-65), to the Mediterranean Sea in August 1962. However, Enterprise was recalled in October to reinforce the naval blockade of Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis. VF-33 took its F8U-1E (F-8B) again aboard Intrepid to the Med in 1961-62 and was then equipped with the F8U-2NE (F-8E) version. In early 1961 the squadron changed already to its fourth jet fighter in seven years, the Vought F8U-1E Crusader, and changed its name back to Tarsiers. In 1958 VF-33 transitioned to the supersonic Grumman F11F-1 Tiger and was renamed Astronauts. As part of CVG-6, VF-33 made two tours to the Mediterranean Sea aboard the USS Intrepid (CVS-11). (*1) redesignated RVAH-7 on Dec.1, 1964 and Supplementing CVW-6 was VAW-33 Det 65 (EA-1Fs).

 

USS Long Beach (CGN-9) sailed for the Mediterranean Sea to join USS ENTERPRISE (CVA(N)-65) and guided-missile frigate USS Bainbridge (DLGN/CGN-25) in the formation of the first all nuclear powered task group 13 May 1964.

 

http://navysite.de/cvn/cvn65.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Sea_Orbit

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Enterprise_(CVN-65)

USS Independence (CVA-62) - 2nd, 6th & 7th

(1st & 2nd Red Sea & Gulf of Aden)

SoLant

1st Cape Horn

Pac

1st WestPac

1st SCS

WestPac

Pac

2nd Cape Horn

SoLant

CVW-7

AG

10 May 1965

13 Dec 1965

Europe

Western Pacific

South China Sea

Indian Ocan

8th FWFD

218-days

Operational Readiness Inspection (ORI) on her 1st Vietnam Combat Cruise

100 days in the South China Sea off the coast of Vietnam.

 

USS Independence (CVA-62) with CVW-7 and Task Force 77, attack carrier tasking force, Rear Admiral James R. Reedy embarked, to operate with USS Midway (CVA-41), USS Coral Sea (CV-43), USS Bon Homme Richard (CVA-31) and USS Oriskany (CVA-34) in a joint effort in support of the United States’ commitments in Vietnam, participating in the first major series of coordinated strikes against vital enemy supply lines north of the Hanoi-Haiphong complex in the South China Sea off the coast of Vietnam, as Flagship of Commander Attack Carrier Striking Force, the first Atlantic Fleet carrier to do so beginning on 5 June 1965, sosuccessfully evading the first massive surface-to-air missile barrage in aviation history while attacking assigned targets, and executing, with daring and precision, the first successful attack on an enemy surface-to-air missile installation.

 

Independence spent 217 days at sea. Ports of call included St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands, n island in the Caribbean Sea and with the islands of Saint John, Saint Croix, and Water Island a county and constituent district of the United States Virgin Islands (USVI), an unincorporated territory of the United States; anchoring at Singapore, officially the Republic of Singapore, is a southeast Asian city-state off the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula, 137 kilometres (85 mi) north of the equator (An island country made up of 63 islands, it is separated from Malaysia by the Straits of Johor to its north and from Indonesia's Riau Islands by the Singapore Strait to its south); Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, mooring at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point, a bay forming part of Luzon Sea on the west coast of the island of Luzon in Zambales, Philippines, about 100 kilometers northwest of Manila Bay; anchoring at Hong Kong, situated on China's south coast and, enclosed by the Pearl River Delta and South China Sea; Yokosuka, Japan, a city in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, covering an area of 100.7 km² and is the 11th most populous city in Greater Tokyo, 12th in the Kantō region and a second visit to Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines.

 

Squadrons: VF-41, F-4B; VF-84, F-4B; VA-72, A-4E; VA-86, A-4E; VA-75, A-6A; RVAH-1, RA-5C; VAW-12 Det. 62, E-1B; VAH-4 Det. 62, A-3B; *VAW-13 Det. 1, EA-1F; *VQ-l Det., A-3 (EA-3B) and HU-2 Det. 62 (*1), UH-2A.

 

*These squadron detachments were not aboard the carrier for the entire deployment and (*1) HU-2 redesignated HC-2 on Jul.1, 1965.

USS Boxer (LPH-4) - 2nd, Pacific Fleet & 7th

SoLant

Caribbean Sea 3rd Panama Canal

EastPac

West Pac

EastPac

4 th Panama Canal

Caribbean Sea

SoLant

HMM-264

 

10 Aug 1965

28 Oct 1965

Vietnam

20th FWFD

79-days

Transporting elements of the Army's First Cavalry Division on board. She carried 1200 personnel, 205 helicopters and 6 OV-1 airplanes to the combat zone. Aircraft on her flight deck include 6 OV-1 (dark colored-forward); 4 CH-54 (white-just forward of island); 56 CH-47 (dark colored-amidships and aft) and 36 UH-1 (white-amidships and forward). The remaining 109 helicopters are presumably stowed on Boxer's hangar deck.

 

Ports of call: Subic Bay, PI; Hong Kong, BCC; Naples, Italy; Barcelona, Spain.

USS Enterprise CVA(N)-65) - 2nd & 7th straits of Malacca

Solant

2nd Cape of Good Hope

2nd Indian Ocean voyage

1st South China Sea

1st Vietnam Combat

1st WestPac

CVW-9

NG

26 Oct 1965

21 Jun 1966

West Coast Transfer

Vietnam War

6th FWFD

239-Days

Tour of duty with the 7th Fleet

Home Port Change to Naval Air Station Alameda, California announced on 1 October 1965 and Operational Readiness Inspection (ORI), Operation Rolling Thunder, Steel Tiger, Kick Quick IV and Blue Sky. Becoming the first nuclear-powered ship to engage in combat when it launched bomb-laden aircraft in a projection of power against the Viet Cong near Bien Hoa on 2 December 1965, when she launched 125 sorties on the first day, unleashing 167 tons of bombs and rockets on the enemy's supply lines, followed the next day, setting a record of 165 strike sorties in a single day; transferring to the Pacific Fleet upon conclusion of her deployment.

 

Ports of call include: St. Thomas, Virgin Islands; Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines; Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines; Victoria Island, Hong Kong; Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines; Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines; Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines; Manila Bay, Republic of Philippines and Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines.

 

CVW-9 Squadrons: VA-36, VA-76, VA-93 and VA-94 (A-4Cs), VF-92 and VF-96 (F-4Bs), Reconnaissance Attack Squadron (RVAH)-7 (North American RA-5C Vigilantes), VAH-4 Det. M (Douglas A-3B Skywarrior tankers, not initially redesignated as KA-3Bs), VAW-11 Det M (E-1Bs) and HC-1 Det. M (UH-2As), the latter departing from Naval Auxiliary Air Station (NAAS) Ream Field, Imperial Beach, Calif., via airlift to the east coast and combining with pilots and crewmen from HC-2 to form the Det., proceeding on with the carrier to the west coast. Some 96 aircraft were assigned to the wing: 24 Phantom IIs, 56 Skyhawks, six Vigilantes, three Skywarriors, four Tracers and three Seasprites. VAs-36 and 76, RVAH-7, VAH-4 Det. M and HC-1 Det. M, deployed on 26 October 1965. VQ-1 Det. and VAP-61 Det. squadron’s detachments were not aboard the carrier for the entire deployment. VAW-13 Det. M's, Zappers, Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron Douglas, EA-1F Skyraider, Attack Fighter - Special electronic installation records for 1966 do not specify the carriers they operated aboard.  However, the records indicate VAW-13 Det. 1 (located at Cubi Point, P.I.) provided detachments in support of fleet strikes from the carriers on Yankee Station and HC-1 Det. 5 transferred from Worden to the “Big E”, on 5 June.

 

USS Fred T. Berry (DD 858), USS Sacramento (AOE 1) and USS Bainbridge (DLGN/CGN-25) joined USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) as part of her task force.

USS Intrepid (CVS-11) -

straits of Malacca x 2

SoLant

1st Cape of Good Hope

IO

1st South China Sea

1st Vietnam Combat

IO

2nd Cape of Good Hope

SoLant

CVW-10

AK

4 Apr 1966

21 Nov 1966

Vietnam War

“USS Intrepid (CVS-11) with CVW-10 embarked departed Norfolk, Virginia 4 April 1966, on her first South China Sea  deployment, on her first Vietnam Combat cruise, during the Vietnam Conflict/War, steaming through the South Atlantic operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, around Cape of Good Hope to the Indian Ocean, steaming through the straits of Malacca, operating with the Pacific Fleet under the direction of the 7th Fleet in the Far East off Vietnam, before arriving to the South China Sea, possibly via Subic Bay; making history, CVW-10 pilots scored what is believed to be one of the fastest aircraft launching times recorded by an American carrier (nine A-4 Skyhawks and six A-1 Skyraiders, loaded with bombs and rockets, were catapulted in 7 minutes, with only 28 seconds between launches and a few days later planes were launched at 26-second intervals, spending 7 months of outstanding service with the 7th Fleet off Vietnam, her Commanding Officer, Captain John W. Fair, the Legion of Merit for combat operations in Southeast Asia and upon conclusion of deployment, most likely departed Subic Bay after departing the South China Sea before heading back home, steaming through the straits of Malacca, into the Indian Ocean around Cape of Good Hope and through the South Atlantic operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet (4 April to 21 November 1966)” (Ref. 1-Intrepid, 72 & 76).

USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVA-42) - straits of Malacca x 2

SoLant

1st Cape of Good Hope

IO

1st South China Sea

1st Vietnam Combat

IO

2nd Cape of Good Hope

SoLant

CVW-1

AB

21 June 1966

21 Feb 1967

Vietnam War

“USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVA-42) with CVW-1 embarked departed Norfolk, Virginia 21 June 1966, her first South China Sea  deployment, on her first Vietnam Combat cruise, during the Vietnam Conflict/War, steaming through the South Atlantic operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, around Cape of Good Hope to the Indian Ocean, steaming through the straits of Malacca, operating with the Pacific Fleet under the direction of the 7th Fleet in the Far East off Vietnam, stopping at Subic Bay in the Philippines, before reaching the South China Sea and conducting operations during which time, she suffered the loss of seven when a flash fire occurs in a storage compartment containing oil and hydraulic fluid four decks below the hangar deck on 4 November 1966 and upon conclusion of deployment, most likely departed Subic Bay after departing the South China Sea before heading back home, steaming through the straits of Malacca, into the Indian Ocean around Cape of Good Hope and through the South Atlantic operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet (21 June 1966 to 21 February 1967)” (Ref. 1-Franklin D. Roosevelt, 72 & 76).

USS Intrepid (CVS-11) -

1st Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, Arabian Sea & IO voyage

straits of Malacca x 2

Lant

7th Med

1st Suez Canal

2nd South China Sea

2nd Vietnam Combat

IO

3rd Cape of Good Hope

SoLant

CVW-10

AK

11 May 1967

30 Dec 1967

Vietnam War

“USS Intrepid (CVS-11) with CVW-10 embarked departed Norfolk, Virginia 11 May 1967, on her second South China Sea and her second Vietnam Combat cruise, during the Vietnam Conflict/War, traveling through the Atlantic operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, on her seventh voyage in the Mediterranean Sea in which six were deployments, operating with the 6th Fleet, her first Suez Canal transit just prior to its closing during the Arab-Israeli crisis, steaming through the Red Sea, Gulf of Aden and Arabian Sea into the Indian Ocean and the straits of Malacca, possibly via Subic Bay, operating with the Pacific Fleet under the direction of the 7th Fleet in the Far East off Vietnam and upon conclusion of her deployment, most likely departed Subic Bay after departing the South China Sea before heading back home, steaming through the straits of Malacca, into the Indian Ocean around Cape of Good Hope and through the South Atlantic operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet (11 May to 30 December 1967)” (Ref. 1-Intrepid, 72 & 76).

USS Forrestal (CVA-59) -

straits of Malacca x 2

SoLant

1st Cape of Good Hope

IO

1st South China Sea

1st Vietnam Combat

IO

2nd Cape of Good Hope

SoLant

CVW-17

AA

6 Jun 1967

5 Sep 1967

Vietnam War

“USS Forrestal (CVA-59) with CVW-17 embarked departed Norfolk Va. 6 June 1967, on her first South China Sea deployment and her second Vietnam Combat cruise, during the Vietnam Conflict/War, traveling through the Southern Atlantic operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, steaming around Cape of Good Hope to the Indian Ocean, steaming through the straits of Malacca, operating with the Pacific Fleet under the direction of the 7th Fleet in the Far East off Vietnam, arriving Gulf of Tonkin on 29 July 1967, operating on Yankee Station off the coast of North Vietnam conducting combat operations the same day, cutting a wake through the calm waters of the Gulf of Tonkin, launching aircraft from her flight deck on strikes against an enemy whose coastline was only a few miles over the horizon. For four days, the planes of Attack Carrier Air Wing 17 (CVW-17) had been launched on, and recovered from, about 150 missions against targets in North Vietnam. On the ship's four-acre flight deck, her crewmen went about the business at hand, the business of accomplishing the second launch of the fifth day in combat. On the fifth such day of operations and at 10:52am the crew was starting the second launch cycle of the day, when suddenly a Zuni rocket accidentally fired from an F-4 Phantom into a parked and armed A-4 Skyhawk. The launch that was scheduled for a short time later was never made. Lt. Cmdr. John S. John McCain III, later a prisoner of war in Vietnam and still later U.S. Senator from Arizona, said later he heard a "whooshy" sound then a "low-order explosion" in front of him. Suddenly, two A-4s ahead of his plane were engulfed in flaming jet fuel — JP-5 — spewed from them. A bomb dropped to the deck and rolled about six feet and came to rest in a pool of burning fuel. The accidental launch and subsequent impact caused the belly fuel tank and a 1,000 pound bomb on the Skyhawk to fall off, the tank broke open spilling JP5 (jet fuel) onto the flight deck and ignited a fire. Within a minute and a half the bomb was the first to cook-off and explode, this caused a massive chain reaction of explosions that engulfed half the airwings aircraft, and blew huge holes in the steel flight deck. Fed by fuel and bombs from other aircraft that were armed and ready for the coming strike, the fire spread quickly, many pilots and support personnel were trapped and burned alive. Fuel and bombs spilled into the holes in the flight deck igniting fires on decks further into the bowels of the ship. Berthing spaces immediately below the flight deck became death traps for fifty men, while other crewmen were blown overboard by the explosion. Nearby ships hastened to the Forrestal aid. The USS Oriskany (CV-34), herself a victim of a tragic fire in October 1966, stood by to offer fire-fighting and medical aid to the larger carrier. Nearby escort vessels sprayed water on the burning Forrestal and within an hour the fire on the flight deck was under control. The crew heroically fought the fire and carried armed bombs to the side of the ship to throw them overboard for 13 hours. Secondary fires below deck took another 12 hours to contain. Once the fires were under control, the extent of the awful conflagration or devastation was apparent. Most tragic was the loss to the crew, 134 had lost their lives, while an additional 64 were injured, this was and still remains the single worst loss of life on a navy vessel since the USS Franklin (CV-13) was bombed in WWII. The ship proceeded to Cubi Point in the Philippines for temporary repairs. In only eight days enough repairs were made that she could start the long trip back to her homeport of Norfolk, Virginia for permanent repairs. On her way home she was capable of operating aircraft if needed. With over a dozen major detonations from 1,000 and 500 lb bombs and numerous missile, fuel tank, and aircraft explosions no ship has ever survived the pounding Forrestal underwent that day, before or since. She and her crew proved the toughness and dangers associated with the operation of super-carriers, this is one of her greatest legacies. The entire nation felt the tragedy, and Life magazine reported, "In five minutes, everyone became a man. Upon conclusion of deployment, Forrestal steamed through the straits of Malacca into the Indian Ocean, steaming around Cape of Good Hope en route to the Southern Atlantic, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet” (Ref. 1-Forrestal, 72, 76 & 84A).

USS Arlington (AGMR-2), former Saipan (AGMR-2), (CC-3), (AVT-6) and (CVL-48) (Communi-cations Major Relay ship)

Lant

Caribbean Sea

Panama Canal

EastPac

 

 

 

7 Jul 1967

late July or early August 1967

Transfer to thee 7th Fleet

6th FWFD

25 est.-days

Home Port transfer from Norfolk, Va. to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

USS Intrepid (CVS-11) -

straits of Malacca x 2

SoLant

4th Cape of Good Hope

IO

3rd South China Sea

3rd Vietnam Combat

IO

5th Cape of Good Hope

SoLant

CVW-10

AK

4 Jun 1968

8 Feb 1969

Vietnam War

“USS Intrepid (CVS-11) with CVW-10 embarked departed Norfolk, Virginia 4 June 1968, on her third South China Sea deployment, on her first Vietnam Combat cruise, during the Vietnam Conflict/War, operating with the Pacific Fleet under the direction of the 7th Fleet in the Far East off Vietnam, steaming through the South Atlantic operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, around Cape of Good Hope to the Indian Ocean, steaming through the straits of Malacca, before arriving to the South China Sea, possibly via Subic Bay; making history, CVW-10 pilots scored what is believed to be one of the fastest aircraft launching times recorded by an American carrier (nine A-4 Skyhawks and six A-1 Skyraiders, loaded with bombs and rockets, were catapulted in 7 minutes, with only 28 seconds between launches and a few days later planes were launched at 26-second intervals, spending 7 months of outstanding service with the 7th Fleet off Vietnam, her Commanding Officer, Captain John W. Fair, the Legion of Merit for combat operations in Southeast Asia and upon conclusion of deployment, most likely departed Subic Bay after departing the South China Sea before heading back home, steaming through the straits of Malacca, into the Indian Ocean around Cape of Good Hope and through the South Atlantic operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet (4 June 1968 to 8 February 1969)” (Ref. 1-Intrepid, 72 & 76).

USS America (CVA-66) -  2nd & 7th

SoLant

1st Cape of Good Hope

IO

Sunda Strait 1st SCS

Coral Sea Tasman Sea IO

2nd Cape of Good Hope

SoLant

CVW-6

AE

10 Apr 1968

16 Dec 1968

Vietnam Conflict/War

4th FWFD

251-days

1st Vietnam Combat Cruise

 

Visited Rio De Janeiro, Brazil; Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines; Hong Kong; Yokosuka, Japan; Sydney, Australia and Wellington, New Zealand and Brazil.

 

Squadrons: VF-102, F-4J; VF-33, F-4J; VA-82, A-7A; VA-86, A-7A; VA-85, A-6A / A-6B; RVAH-13, RA-5C; VAW-122, E-2A; VAH-10 Det. 66 (*1) (*3), KA-3B; VAW-13 Det. 66 (*2) (*3), EKA-3B and HC-2 Det. 66, UH-2A/UH-2B.

 

(*1) redesignated VAQ-129 on Sep.1, 1970.

(*2) redesignated VAQ-130 on Oct.1, 1968.

(*3) departed CVA-66 on Nov.1, 1968 for homecoming to NAS Alameda.

VAW-13 DET.66 redesignated VAQ-130 on Oct.1, 1968.

VAW was designated Carrier Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron in 1968 - Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron 1969 until Present.

VAP-61's Command History Report for 1968 indicated continued support of 7th Fleet carriers on Yankee Station.  However, the squadron's report does not identify the detachments deployed aboard carriers in WestPac during 1968.

In 1968 an HC-7 detachment was formed and given the mission of maintaining year-round combat configured helos aboard carriers and other ships operating on Yankee Station for combat search and rescue missions.  The 1968 Command History Report for HC-7 does not identify all the specific ships that detachment 110 operated aboard.

VQ-1 detachments continued to support carrier operations in Vietnam, however, the 1968 Command History Report for VQ-1 does not mention any detachments that were aboard carriers operating on Yankee Station.

 

USS Vega (AF-59) and USS Epperson (DD-719) was part of task force USS America (CVA-66).

USS Yorktown (CVS-10)

WestPac

EastPac

SoPac

1st Cape Horn

SoLant

Lant

 

 

2 Jan 1969

28 Feb 1969

East Coast Transfer

Late in November and early in December, USS Yorktown (CVS-10) served as a platform for the filming of another movie, Tora! Tora! Tora!, which recreated the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. In December she served as one of the recovery ships for the Apollo 8 space shot. The two unique missions mentioned above were conducted out of Pearl Harbor. USS Yorktown (CVS-10) operated out of the West Coast since her arrival in Pearl Harbor on 24 July 1943, when she began a month of exercises in the Hawaiian Islands during WW II. USS Yorktown (CVS-10) departed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 2 January 1969 and headed for Long Beach, California and, after a two-week stop in Long Beach, continued her voyage to join the Atlantic Fleet, on her Eastern and Southern Pacific and Southern Atlantic deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet via Cape Horn and change of homeport of Norfolk, Virginia and operational control to the Atlantic Fleet (2 January to 28 February 1969)” (Ref. 1-Yorktown, 72 & 76).

USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) - 2nd & Pacific

Refueling Transit

EastPac

SoPac

2nd Cape Horn

SoLant

 

 

14 Jul 1969

12 Aug 1969

East Coast Transfer

10th FWFD

30-Days

Departed Alameda, California, on her homeport transfer to the East Coast,  steaming to Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia for her second Refueling in 1970 through the Eastern and Southern Pacific around Cape Horn operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, steaming through the Southern North Atlantic on her ninth deployment; transferring to the Pacific Fleet upon conclusion of her first Vietnam Combat cruise and second Indian Ocean voyage. Loaded crewmen’s automobiles and departed Alameda, California 14 July 1969, on her homeport transfer to Norfolk, VA., announced on 10 July 1969, due to the carrier’s second Refueling, scheduled for at least 50 weeks.

USS Arlington (AGMR-2), former Saipan (AGMR-2), (CC-3), (AVT-6) and (CVL-48) (Communi-cations Major Relay ship)

Western Pacific

 

 

after 24 Jul 1969

21 Aug  1969

Transfer from the 7th Fleet to the West Coast

28 est.-days

 

Home Port Transfer from Pearl Harbor, Hawaii to Long Beach, Calif.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U. S. Navy

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS RECORD OF

EAST/WEST COAST TRANSFERS AND TRANSITS

(Panama Canal, Cape Horn, Cape of Good Hope and Suez Canal)

 

Summary Total - September 1945 to Present

 

U. S. Aircraft Carrier Deployments and or both Panama Canal, Cape Horn, Cape of Good Hope and Suez Canal Transits and East /West Coast Transfers

Panama Canal, Cape Horn, Cape of Good Hope and Suez Canal Transits and East Coast/West Coast Transfers

 

Part I of VIII – 1928 to 1945

Part II of VIII – 1946 to 1969

Part III of VIII – 1970 to 1989

Part IV of VIII – 1990 to 1993

Part V of VIII – 1994 to 2000

Part VI of VIII – 2001 to 2005

Part VII of VIII – 2006 to 2012

Part VIII of VIII – 2013 to Present

 

 

Panama Canal, Cape Horn, Cape of Good Hope and Suez Canal Transits and East Coast/West Coast Transfers

Part II of VIII – 1946 to 1969

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIER SHIP

HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619