U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS RECORD OF

EAST/WEST COAST TRANSFERS AND TRANSITS

(Panama Canal, Cape Horn, Cape of Good Hope and Suez Canal)

 

Summary Total - September 1945 to Present

 

U. S. Aircraft Carrier Deployments and or both Panama Canal, Cape Horn, Cape of Good Hope and Suez Canal Transits and East /West Coast Transfers

Panama Canal, Cape Horn, Cape of Good Hope and Suez Canal Transits and East Coast/West Coast Transfers

 

Part I of VIII – 1928 to 1945

Part II of VIII – 1946 to 1969

Part III of VIII – 1970 to 1989

Part IV of VIII – 1990 to 1993

Part V of VIII – 1994 to 2000

Part VI of VIII – 2001 to 2005

Part VII of VIII – 2006 to 2012

Part VIII of VIII – 2013 to Present

 

1990

 

Valiant Blitz 90

 

“Various exercises are conducted to maintain the readiness of components and units of the Combined Forces Command defending the Republic of Korea. Valiant Blitz conducts amphibious operations training.

 

Alamo (LSD-33) headed to Korea to participate in the bilateral exercise Operation "Valiant Blitz 85-1" in cooperation with elements of the South Korean Navy and Marine Corps.

 

From 8-13 June 1983, USS Elliot (DD-967) participated in exercise VALIANT BLITZ conducted off the coast of Okinawa. Like BALIKATAN/TANGENT FLASH, it was a amphibious exercise. ELLIOT provided naval gunfire support for the marine landing forces and screening actions against hostile forces opposing the transport ships.

 

Air Wing ELEVEN made the final cruise aboard USS Enterprise (CVN-65) from September 1989 to March 1990. Highlights of the world cruise included exercises: PACEX, ANNUALEX 89 and Valiant Blitz 90 which heralded the largest assemblage of U.S. Naval Air and Sea Power since World War II. Coordinated operations involving triple carrier battle group (USS Enterprise (CVN-65), USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70), and USS Constellation (CV-64) and dual battle force (USS Enterprise (CVN-65), USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70), USS New Jersey (BB-62) and USS Missouri (BB-63)) units on conjunction with the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force, Republic of Korea Navy and Air Force, U.S. Air Force and U.S. Marine Corps provided highly successful joint training” (Ref. 1144).

 

 Valiant Blitz 90

 

“June 1990 found VMA-231 deployed to WESTPAC as a squadron for the first time since World War II. Training continued in Iwakuni and Okinawa, Japan, as well as the Philippine Islands and Korea. Exercises included multiple air defense exercises with the Japanese Air Defense Force” (Ref. 1144).

 

 “On 2 August 1990, 0200 local time, 100,000 Iraqi troops massed on the border of Kuwait. Saddam Hussein, Iraq’s leader, seething over Kuwait’s insistence on compensation for Iraq’s unpaid war debt from the Iran-Iraq war (1980-1988), it’s overproduction of oil, and claiming evidence that the Kuwaitis were slant drilling into the Rumaila oil field, ordered them to invade. Iraq deposed Sheik Jabir Ahmed Sabah and established a puppet government.

 

That same day, President Bush joined world leaders in condemning the invasion. A massive diplomatic effort to force Iraq to withdraw her troops ensued, as U.N. Security Council Resolution 660 called for the immediate and unconditional withdrawal of Iraqi forces. The next day, the United States and Soviet Union jointly denounced Iraq’s invasion of her neighbor. On 6 August, Iraq cut off its oil shipments through one of Turkey’s pipelines, shifting the focus of the crisis to Saudi Arabia, the major remaining outlet for Iraq’s petroleum production. That same day, U.S. Secretary of Defense Dick Cheney met with Saudi King Fahd to discuss the deployment of U.S. troops to Saudi Arabia. Also on 6 August, the Pentagon gave President Bush a proposal for a multinational naval force, which included Soviet ships, to enforce the U.N. trade embargo against Iraq made earlier that day if diplomatic efforts failed. USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) proceeded from the eastern Mediterranean through the Suez Canal into the Red Sea; Independence began maneuvers in the North Arabian Sea. The following day, 7 August, President Bush ordered U.S. military aircraft and troops to Saudi Arabia after King Fahd approved the deployment of a multinational force to defend his country against a possible Iraqi invasion from the Saudi border with Kuwait” (Ref. 1-Saratoga).

Operation Desert Shield

 

“On 2 August 1990, Iraq invaded its neighbor Kuwait, and U.S. forces moved into Saudi Arabia as part of Operation Desert Shield to protect that country against invasion by Iraq” (Ref. 1- Midway & 72).

 

“Through the 1980s several frigate- and destroyer-type ships and minesweepers were assigned to the Middle East Force as well as support ships.  After the 2 August 1990 Iraqi occupation of Kuwait, the largest armada since World War II assembled in the Gulf in support of Operation Desert Shield.  The Middle East Force found itself operating under operational control of the U.S. Naval Forces Central Command (NAVCENT), an Echelon II command, that supports all naval operations in the U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) area of responsibility (AOR)” (Ref. 1-Saratoga, 72, 313 & 359).

 

“USS VALCOUR became the first permanent flagship for the Middle East Force in 1961 after an extensive overhaul and redesignation as a miscellaneous command ship. In July 1972, USS LA SALLE replaced VALCOUR as flagship. Middle East Force ships were the first U.S. military units to take action following the August 2, 1990, invasion of Kuwait when they began Maritime Interception Operations in support of United Nations sanctions against Iraq” (Ref. 359).

 

Valiant Blitz 90

 

Valiant Blitz 90 was conducted in Eastern Korea during November 1990” (Ref. 1144).

 

Operation Provide Comfort

 

Valiant Blitz 90

 

BEACHCREST 90 was conducted in Okinawa in December 1990” (Ref. 1144).

 

Operation Provide Comfort was a military operation by the United States, starting in 1990, to defend Kurds fleeing their homes in northern Iraq in the aftermath of the Persian Gulf War” (Ref. 679).

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

AIR WING

T.C.

DEPART

RETURN

Days at  Sea

USS Constellation (CV-64)

 

EastPac

SoPac

2nd Cape Horn

SoLant

NoLant

CVW-9

NG

13 Feb 1990

July 1990

East Coast Transfer

USS Constellation (CV-64) with CVW-2 embarked departed San Diego, Calif. 13 February 1990, on her home port transfer steaming through the Eastern Pacific to the South Pacific, around Cape Horn and steamed through the South Atlantic to the east coast for a three-year Service Life Extension Program (SLEP) at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Pa., via Norfolk, Va. (13 February to July 1990)” (Ref. 1-Constellation & 72).

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) - 2nd, 6th, NAVCENT & 7th (1st Red Sea dep.)

NorLant

6th Med

1st Suez Canal

Red Sea

1st ODS

2nd Indian Ocean

1st MIO        2nd IO

2nd Suez Canal

Med

NorLant

CVW-7

AG

8 Mar 1990

12 Sep 1990

Europe

Middle East

Iraqi occup-ation of Kuwait

12th FWFD

189-days

Ike Centennial Cruise

Participating with USS Forrestal (CV-59) in maritime threat scenarios as part of National Week 90B, Joint Exercise Distant Thunder 90-1 with British and Turkish forces from 14 to 21 April 1990. Tomcats and Hornets flew dissimilar air combat training against British Panavia GR, Dragon Hammer 90, consisting of combined operations, coordinated air defense, and maritime and amphibious training, pitting her Tomcats against British Tornados, French and Spanish Mirages and Spanish Harrier, Journey to Victory, a commemoration of the Allied landings in Normandy from 2 to 6 June 1990, National Week 90, Operation Spellex, forming five stars and the numbers 1890–1990 in honor of the centennial celebration of President Eisenhower's birth on 17 March 1990, on her first Red Sea deployment in support of her 1st Operation Desert Shield, in retaliation of Iraqi occupation of Kuwait on 2 August 1990, when the largest armada since World War II assembled in the Gulf in support of Operation Desert Shield and Maritime Interception Operations (MIO) to enforce UN Security Council Resolution 51, which imposed an embargo upon ships entering or leaving Iraqi-occupied Kuwaiti and Iraqi ports. Ike will serve as a ready striking force in the event Iraq invaded Saudi Arabia, and will participate in maritime interception operations in support of a United Nations embargo against Iraq, becoming the first carrier to conduct sustained operations in the Red Sea and Indian Ocean, the only the second nuclear-powered aircraft carrier ever to transit the Suez Canal.

 

Ports of call included: Haifa, Israel and Augusta Bay.

 

Squadrons: VF-143, Pukin' Dogs, Fighter Squadron, F-14B; VF-142, Ghostriders, Fighter Squadron, F-14B; VA-46, Clansmen, Attack Squadron, FA-18A; VA-72, Blue Hawks, Attack Squadron, FA-18A; VA-34, Blue Blasters, Attack Squadron, A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D; VAW-121, Bluetails, Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron, E-2C; VAQ-140, Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron, EA-6B; HS-5, Night Dippers, Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron, SH-3H and VS-31, Top Cats, Air Anti-Submarine Squadron, S-3B.

 

USS Ticonderoga (CG-47); USS Peterson (DD-969) and USS Oklahoma City (SSN-723) joined USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) as part of her task force.

USS Saratoga (CV-60) - 6th & Central Command (1st Arabian Sea and Persian Gulf and 3rd & 4th Red Sea, Gulf)

 

Lant

21st Med

3rd Suez Canal

1st Red Sea

Desert Shield

4th Suez Canal

Med

5th Suez Canal

2nd Red Sea

Desert Storm/ Shield

6th Suez Canal

Med

7th Suez Canal

Desert Storm/ Shield

2nd Red Sea

8th Suez Canal

Med

Lant

CVW-17

AA

7 Aug 1990

27 Mar 1991

Europe

Middle East

1st Iraq War

Red Sea

1st Operation Desert Shield and 1st Operation Desert Storm

 

USS Saratoga (CV-60) with CVW-17 embarked departed Mayport, Florida 7 August 1990, on her 21st Mediterranean Sea deployment, steaming through the North Atlantic operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea, operating with the 6th Fleet, on her first Red Sea deployment in support of Operation Desert Shield/Operation Desert Storm, just days after Iraqi tanks invaded Kuwait, operating under the direction of the U.S. Naval Forces Central Command (Operation Desert Storm commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991), with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component commander for Central Command, with Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait). Steaming through the North Atlantic, Saratoga and the battleship Wisconsin (BB-64) sailed to the eastern Mediterranean Sea in support of Operation Desert Shield, making her third Suez Canal transit on 22 August 1990, entering the Red Sea on her 3rd Red Sea voyage. USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) anchored in Augusta Bay on 1 September, for turnover with USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69). Rear Admiral Mixson, ComCarGru 2, assumed command of TF 60, and John F. Kennedy stood into the central Med to join Dwight D. Eisenhower for National Week ’90 exercises On 4 September 1990, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) took over as the Mediterranean carrier. Six days later, she anchored off Alexandria; the visit lasted for only three days, however, due to Iraqi overtures. The warship soon sailed once more; she transited the Suez Canal on 14 September and stood into the Red Sea. Before the outbreak of hostilities in Iraq, the Saratoga suffered a loss of 21 crewmembers in a ferry boat accident off the coast of Haifa, Israel. The next day, she joined Saratoga. The two carriers operated together for the next two days before John F. Kennedy assumed the watch in the Red Sea while Saratoga moved to the Mediterranean Sea on 15 September 1990 via her fourth Suez Canal transit. John F. Kennedy conducted operations in the Red Sea while at general quarters throughout the rest of September and October, launching aircraft nearly every day and conducted training sorties over Saudi Arabia, until 27 October, when John F. Kennedy held a turnover with USS Saratoga (CV-60), having departed the Mediterranean Sea after operations, transiting the Suez Canal her third time while on deployment on her fifth transit for operations in the Red Sea, on her 4th Red Sea voyage, while John F. Kennedy headed back to the Suez Canal, transiting a second time while on deployment (4th transit) en route to the Mediterranean Sea, conducting a night transit to Gaeta, anchoring on 30 October 1990. After operations in the Mediterranean Sea, John F. Kennedy set course for the Suez Canal on 30 November 1990, making her third Suez Canal transit of her deployment (5th transit) just after midnight on 2 December 1990, entering the Red Sea on 3 December 1990 and began turnover duties with USS Saratoga (CV-60). Saddam Hussein claimed on Iraqi television that Saratoga had been sunk, along with several other Coalition vessels. On one occasion during the war, a missile, possibly a Scud, was launched in the general direction of the Saratoga in the Red Sea, but it was either unguided, or launched on a hunch, as it was determined early in its flight path it would miss by more than 100 nautical miles (200 km). It’s reported that Saratoga made six Suez Canal transits during her deployment but the dates were not reported, yet operating together both carriers conducted simulated strikes on targets in western Saudi Arabia. Saratoga would have had to move to the Mediterranean Sea via her sixth Suez Canal transit and fourth transit of her deployment and upon return to the Red Sea would have made her 5th Red Sea voyage and her seventh Suez Canal transit and fifth transit of her deployment. Aircraft from Saratoga flew against Iraq in the first step to knock out the Arab nation's military power and drive it from conquered Kuwait. The ship launched many flights in support of operations, including that of Scott Speicher. Another Saratoga aircraft shot down was an A-6E Intruder. Navigator-Bombardier LT Jeffrey Zaun, who was paraded before cameras by his Iraqi captors. He was eventually returned to American forces and was able to return to the Saratoga. Saratoga-based US Navy SEALs conducted the first wartime boardings of merchant shipping in the Red Sea in support of Operation Desert Shield. Royal Air Force Vice Marshall William J. Wratten and Wing Commander Mick Richardson visited John F. Kennedy on 4 December from Tobuk, Saudi Arabia, to discuss the conduct of an air war with Iraq. Captain John P. Gay relieved Captain Browne as commanding officer of John F. Kennedy on 7 December 1990. Rear Admiral Mixson, Commander, TG 150.5, on hand for the ceremony, presented Captain Browne with the Legion of Merit. This change of command ceremony proved unique in John F. Kennedy’s history as it was held while the ship was underway in the Red Sea. This was the first change of command ceremony conducted in the khaki working uniform with ball caps. Media representatives from the Joint Information Bureau in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, flew out to John F. Kennedy on 13 December 1990 to discuss morale and holiday plans with the sailors. Representatives from BBC-TV, the Associated Press, United Press International, WBZ (Boston) Radio, Independent Radio News, U.S. News and World Report, and Reuters stayed on board for two days. After conducting several small-scale exercises, John F. Kennedy entered port in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia on the morning of 29 December 1990, thus becoming the first U.S. aircraft carrier to visit Saudi Arabia. The Saudis hospitably set up a bank of 100 telephones in a warehouse across the pier from where the carrier lay moored, from which the men could call their loved ones. On New Year’s Day 1991, Vice President Dan Quayle paid a four-hour visit to John F. Kennedy, to demonstrate national solidarity with the forces deployed in Desert Shield and spoke to the sailors in the hangar bay of the ship. The next day, the carrier got underway from Jeddah to return to the Red Sea operating area and conducted a passing-at-sea exercise named Camelot with the Royal Saudi Arabian Navy and Air Force. Together, they trained in surface, sub-surface, and air warfare, in addition to underway replenishment, live firing, and shipping interdiction. John F. Kennedy braced herself for the prospects of war. The training and practice runs became more intense when on 13 January 1991, word reached the ship that hostilities with Iraq were perceived as inevitable with pre-emptive strikes from Iraq probable. In response to this alert, John F. Kennedy increased her level of preparedness and set material condition zebra main deck and below. Two days later, on 15 January 1991, the dialogue between the future combatants took an ominous tone. White House Spokesman Marlin Fitzwater warned that military action “could occur at any point after midnight 15 January Eastern Standard Time… Any moment after the 15th is borrowed time.” French Prime Minister Michel Rochard lamented “there is a fatal moment when one must act. This moment has, alas, arrived.” Iraqi Information Minister Latif Nassif Jassim, responding to pleas to withdraw Iraqi forces from Kuwait, dashed hopes for a peaceful resolution to the crisis. “Leave Kuwait?” he asked. “Kuwait is a province of Iraq and beyond discussion.” That same day, on board John F. Kennedy, the crew continued working up for strikes against Iraqi forces in the Red Sea, waiting for Iraq’s answer to the 15 January 1991 deadline. Saddam Hussein’s forces did not budge. On 16 January 1991, 1650 Eastern Standard Time, a squadron of F-15E fighter-bombers took off from their base in central Saudi Arabia, and began hitting their targets in Kuwait and Iraq before 1900 Eastern Standard Time. At 2100 Eastern Standard Time, President Bush addressed the nation. Desert Shield was over and the liberation of Kuwait, Operation Desert Storm, had begun. Before her first strikes were launched, Rear Admiral Mixson, Commander Red Sea Force, announced over John F. Kennedy’s 1MC the launch schedule that would commence the following day in less than ten hours. He congratulated the ship for being able to carry out the President’s orders and participate in air strikes on Iraq, strikes that John F. Kennedy had trained for. “You have trained hard. You are ready,” Rear Admiral Mixson concluded, “Now let’s execute. For the aircrews, we are all very, very proud of you. I wish you good hunting and God speed.” On 17 January 1991, 0120 local time, (1720 Eastern Standard Time, 16 January) John F. Kennedy launched her first strikes on Iraq, a half-hour after the initial wave by USAF planes. CVW-3 launched two major strikes of 80 sorties. The mood of the ship had begun with jubilation, then became somber and then anxious as the ship waited for all of her aircraft to return safely. All aircraft were recovered unharmed, the returning aircrew reporting heavy, but ineffective, antiaircraft fire over Baghdad. The strikes had proved successful, prompting one pilot to describe the action thus: “Imagine the Disney World light show, then magnify it 100 times… that’s what it looked like from the sky last night… it was incredible!” On 17 January, Lt. Cmdr. Michael Scott Speicher, flying an F/A-18C Hornet of VFA-81 aboard Saratoga, was shot down by an Iraqi surface-to-air missile, the first U.S. casualty of the Gulf War. He was placed in an MIA status the next day. On May 22, 1991, following a Secretary of the Navy status review board that found "no credible evidence" to suggest he had survived the shootdown, his status was changed to Killed in Action/Body Not Recovered (KIA/BNR). On 11 January 2001, Secretary of the Navy Richard Danzig changed the status of Cmdr. Michael Scott Speicher from KIA/BNR to Missing in Action (MIA), based on new information. Starting on that first day of strikes, John F. Kennedy settled into a routine that lasted through the end of the conflict, engaging in a steady but fast-paced regimen of preparing aircraft, launching them, recovering them, repeating the process. All the while, they kept a mixture of hope and faith in the success of their aircrews, and a suspended disbelief in the lack of casualties. John F. Kennedy’s Intruders launched the first Standoff Land Attack Missiles in combat on 19 January. On 21 January 1991, an F-14 Tomcat of VF-103 aboard Saratoga, was shot down by a surface-to-air missile. Pilot Lt. Devon Jones and Radar Intercept Officer Lt. Lawrence Slade were reported missing. Lt. Jones was recovered the following day, but Lt. Slade was captured as a prisoner of war. Flying on 30 January, all 18 F/A-18s aboard Saratoga delivered 100,000 pounds of MK-83 1,000-lb. bombs on Iraqi position in occupied Kuwait. This was the largest amount of bomb tonnage carried on a single mission. CVW-17 aircraft dropped more than four million pounds of ordnance on enemy targets. The three carrier battle group operations in the Red Sea, commanded by Rear Admiral Mixson, also settled into a routine. John F. Kennedy, Saratoga, and America formed the nucleus of the three groups. Standard procedure called for six-day rotations. Two carriers would launch strike aircraft while the third would operate in an area known as “Gasoline Alley” for two days to replenish munitions, stores, and fuel. Each carrier would be “on the line” for four days conducting either a night or daytime flight operations schedule, then “off duty” for two days. While in “Gasoline Alley,” the carrier under replenishment would also be responsible for AAW, AEW and CTTG alerts. Detached from the Red Sea Battle Force on 7 February 1991, America proceeded to the Persian Gulf. John F. Kennedy and Saratoga changed their procedure to six days on line and two days off duty. In addition to launching strikes, the on-cycle carrier flew combat air patrol aircraft and stood CTTG, while the off-cycle carrier stood AAW, AEW, CTTG, and ASUW alerts when both carriers were on the line. When one of the two carriers was under replenishment, the other carrier would assume responsibility for all alerts. The carrier’s duty cycles of morning (A.M.) or evening (P.M.) were specified as 0000-1500 or 1200-0300 to accommodate returning strike recovery times. Each carrier launched two large strikes with times on target around nine hours apart to allow for deck respot and weapons loading. CAP cycle times were A.M. or P.M. for 12-hour periods. Saratoga departed the Red Sea on 11 March 1991, transiting the Suez Canal on her eighth Suez Canal transit and sixth transit while on her deployment entering the Mediterranean Sea on her 25th Mediterranean Sea voyage and set a course for home, operating with the 6th Fleet and through the North Atlantic, headed south, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, and after seven months and 21 days, 11,700 arrested landings, 12,700 sorties flown, 36,382 miles traveled, Saratoga returned home 28 March to a hero's welcome (7 August 1990 to 28 March 1991)” (Ref. 1-Saratoga, John F. Kennedy, 72, 549 & 1145).

*USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) - 2nd, 6th & Central Command (1st Persian Gulf & 2nd & 3rd North Arabian Sea)

 

Lant

13th Med       3rd Suez Canal

3rd Red Sea

4th Suez Canal  Med

5th Suez Canal

5th Red Sea 3rd Gulf of Aden

2nd North Arabian Sea Gulf of Oman

Strait of Hormuz

1st Persian Gulf

Strait of Hormuz

Gulf of Oman 3rd North Arabian Sea

4th Gulf of Aden

6th Red Sea

6th Suez Canal

Med

Lant

CVW-3

AC

15 Aug 1990

28 Mar 1991

Europe

Middle East

17th FWFD

224-days

 

National Week ’90 Exercises, 1st Operation Desert Shield and 1st Operation Desert Storm, commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991, with Operation Desert Shield commencing on 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait).

 

Ports of call includes: Alexandria, Egypt; Izmir, Turkey; Antalya, Turkey; Jeddah, Saudi Aabia and Hurgada, Egypt.

 

Squadrons: VF-14 (F-14A); VF-32 (F-14A); VA-46 (A-7E); VA-72 (A-7E); VA-75 (A-6E and KA-6D); VAW-126 (E-2C); VAQ-130 (EA-6B); VS-22 (S-3B) and HS-7 (SH-3H).

 

USS South Carolina (CGN-37); USS Mississippi (CGN-40); USS Thomas S. Gates (CG-51) and USS Thomas C. Hart (FF-1092) were part of USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) task force.

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) - 2nd & Pacific Fleet

NorLant

SoLant

1st Cape Horn

SoPac

EastPac

CVW-11

NH

25 Sep 1990

20 Nov 1990

South America

West Coast Transfer

Training Operations

1st FWFD

57-days

Home Port Transfer to the West Coast

CVW-11 MISSILEX, CVW-11 Cyclic OPS in the Puerto Rican Operations Area and Blue Sky III in the Chilean waters, an exercise with the Chileans.

Ports of call: St. Thomas, Virgin Islands; Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Singapore and Valparaíso, Chile

Guided missile frigate USS Doyle (FFG-39) accompanied USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) as part of her escort on its maiden voyage, riding it around South America en route to its new homeport in Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, while Carrier Air Wing Eleven embarked the Navy's newest carrier, making her homeport at Naval Air Station Lemoore” (Ref. 514 or Global Security).

Squadrons: VF-114, F-14A; VF-213, F-14A; VFA-303, F/A-18A; VFA-305, F/A-18A; VA-95, A-6E / KA-6D; VAW-117, E-2C; HS-17 (*1), SH-3H; VAQ-135, EA-6B and VRC-30 Det., C-2A.

 

(*1) disestablished on Jun.30, 1991.

 

Carrier Air Wing Eleven underwent major changes in 1990. A-7E's were replaced by F/A-18 Hornets, and SH-3's were replaced with SH-60 Sea Hawks specially configured for combat search and rescue. The E-2C and the A-6E underwent major upgrades. F/A-18 Hornet, F-14 Tomcat, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking and E-2C Hawkeye.

 

In September 1990, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Norfolk, Virginia, en route Alameda, California, and assignment to the Pacific Fleet. The embarked air wing was composed of aircraft from CVW-8, CVW-11 and CVWR-30 (approximately 60 total aircraft, making up CVW-11, transiting to Alameda, California with CVW-11 embarked, Carrier Qualifications off the Virginia capes (VACAPES) was  conducted. Governor of Illinois visited on the 25th and 26th.

USS America (CV-66) - 2nd, 6th, Central Command & 7th

(1st Arabian / Persian Gulf dep. and 9th & 10th Red Sea, Gulf of Aden & Arabian Sea voy.)

NorLant

14th Med

9th Suez Canal

1st Red Sea

ODS & ODS

10th Suez Canal

Med

NorLant

CVW-1

AB

28 Dec 1990

18 Apr 1991

Europe

Middle East

1st Iraq War

25th FWFD

112-days

“USS America (CV-66) with CVW-1 embarked departed Norfolk, Virginia 28 December 1990, on her 14th Mediterranean Sea voyage operating with the 6th Fleet, steaming through the North Atlantic, operating with the United States Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet en route to the Mediterranean in support of her 1st Operation Desert Shield and 1st Operation Desert Storm on her first Red Sea deployment, her second Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment, operating under the direction of the U.S. Naval Forces Central Command with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component commander for Central Command, with Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait). Transiting the Straits of Gibraltar on 9 January 1991, America made her ninth Suez Canal transit steaming through the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden, arriving on station in the Red Sea 15 January 1991, to participate in Operation Desert Storm commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991, when Operation Desert Shield became Operation Desert Storm, during which time America/CVW-1 team distinguished themselves, on 15 February 1991, as the only carrier and air wing to fight in both the Red Sea and Arabian Sea/Gulf (Persian Gulf), while on 20 February 1991, America VS-32 became the first S-3 squadron to engage, bomb and destroy a hostile vessel — an Iraqi gunboat and on 23 February, aircraft from America destroyed a Silkworm (anti-ship) missile battery after Iraq unsuccessfully fired a missile at USS Missouri (BB 63). Departing the Arabian Gulf on 4 March, America had launched over 3,000 combat sorties, significantly contributing to the liberation of Kuwait, making a port visit to Hurghada, Egypt, making the first port call of the deployment after 78 consecutive days at sea (16 through 22 March 1991), transiting the Suez northward on her tenth Suez Canal transit steaming through the Gulf of Aden and Red Sea to the Mediterranean Sea on 3 April 1991 and five days later, America went through the Straits of Gibraltar to enter the Atlantic Ocean, operating with the United States Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet en on her way home (28 December 1990 to 18 April 1991)”  (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

1st Operation Desert Shield and 1st Operation Desert Storm, commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991, with Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait).

 

Ports visited not reported.

 

Squadrons: VF-102, F-14A; VF-33, F-14A; VFA-82, FA-18C; VFA-86, FA-18C; VA-85, A-6E / KA-6D; VAW-123, E-2C; HS-11, SH-3H; VAQ-137, EA-6B and VS-32, S-3B.

 

USS Normandy (CG-60) was part of USS America (CV-66) battle group.

USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) - 2nd, 6th & Central Command                (1st Arabian

/ Persian Gulf dep. & 1st & 2nd Red Sea & Gulf of Aden)

NoLant

2nd Med

1st Suez Canal

1st Red Sea

1st ODS/Storm

OPC

2nd Suez Canal

NoLant

CVW-8

AJ

28 Dec 1990

28 Jun 1991

Europe

Middle East

1st Iraq War

3rd FWFD

212-days

1st Operation Desert Shield, 1st Operation Provide Comfort, a military operation by the United States, starting in 1990, to defend Kurds fleeing their homes in northern Iraq in the aftermath of the Persian Gulf War and 1st Operation Desert Storm, commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991 until 27 February 1992, when President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated and Operation Desert Storm would end at midnight) and Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait).

 

Ports visited not reported. Dubai, U.A.E.; Haifa, Israel and Rhodes, Greece.

 

Squadrons: VF-41, F-14A; VF-84, F-14A; VFA-15, FA-18A; VFA-87, FA-18A; VA-65 (*1), A-6E; VA-36, A-6E; VAW-124, E-2C; HS-9, SH-3H; VAQ-141, EA-6B; VS-24, S-3B and VRC-40 Det., C-2A.

 

(*1) VA-65 disestablished on Mar. 31, 1993.

 

USS Richmond K. Turner (CG-20) joined USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) as part of her task force.

 

http://www.biega.com/maps/Arabia.gif

 

1991

 

“When Iraq invaded Kuwait in August 1990, four aircraft carriers were deployed to the region to provide carrier based air support for Operation Desert Shield. As the deadline for Iraqi withdrawal from Kuwait approached in January 1991, USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) and USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) deployed to the region via the Suez Canal. VF-33 deployed with USS America (CV-66) arriving just as Operation Desert Storm commenced. America flew sorties alongside John F. Kennedy and Saratoga in the Red Sea before moving to the Persian Gulf to join USS Midway (CV-41), USS Ranger (CV-61) and Theodore Roosevelt. VF-33 and her sister squadron VF-102 were the only Tomcat squadrons to fly missions from both the Red Sea and Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment during Operation Desert Storm” (Ref. 1146).

 

Operation Desert Storm

 

“In the early morning hours of 17 January 1991, Operation Desert Shield became Operation Desert Storm” (Ref. 1-Saratoga & 72).

“In January 1991, with the beginning of Operation Desert Storm, the Middle East Force was absorbed into U.S. Naval Forces Central Command, the Naval component of the U.S. Central Command. Central Command is responsible for all U.S. Military activity in the Middle East and eastern Africa. In the aftermath of the 1990/91 Gulf War, U.S. Naval Forces Central Command ships and those of the coalition partners undertook the largest mine clearing operation since World War II. Nearly 1,300 sophisticated sea mines of various types were swept from the Arabian Gulf, providing the safest passage for naval and merchant ships in decades” (Ref. 359).

 

During Operation Desert Storm in 1991, Carriers operated under operational control of U.S. Naval Forces Central Command where it remained following the war. The Commander, Seventh Fleet served as naval component commander for Central Command. Since the Gulf War, NAVCENT fulfilled the roles of both a naval component command and as the fleet command. Ships from the East and West Coasts comprised the fleet, but it operated without a traditionally understood structure or number” (Ref. 313 & 313A).

 

United Nations Security Council Resolution 688, passed in April 1991, demanded that Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein end the repression of the Iraqi civilian population. Iraqi military bombing and strafing attacks against the Shi’ite Muslims in Southern Iraq during the remainder of 1991” (Ref. 457).

 

Operation Provide Comfort

 

“When Iraqi forces turned on the Kurds, USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) and CVW-8 were among the first coalition forces in Operation Provide Comfort, flying patrols over northern Iraq”  (Ref. 383).

 

Operation Provide Comfort was a military operation by the United States, starting in 1990, to defend Kurds fleeing their homes in northern Iraq in the aftermath of the Persian Gulf War and was formed on 6 April 1991 and deployed to Incirlik Air Base, Turkey, to conduct humanitarian operations in northern Iraq. Maj Gen James L. Jamerson, the USAFE deputy chief of staff for operations, commanded the effort. After British and French cargo aircraft arrived the next day, he redesignated the organization as a Combined Task Force. The task force dropped its first supplies to Kurdish refugees on 7 April. The result of President Bush’s order and UN resolution 688, culminated in a coalition of 13 nations with material contributions from 30 countries working under the command and control of the Coalition Task Force. Although many nations ultimately contributed to the operation, the primary countries involved were the US, the United Kingdom, France, and Turkey.

 

“On 16 April 1991, the President of the US, authorized by UN resolution 688, expanded Operation Provide Comfort to include multinational forces with the additional mission of establishing temporary refuge camps in northern Iraq. This unit was first labeled "Express Care." On 17 April, when it had become apparent that a ground presence in northern Iraq was necessary, Lt Gen John M. Shalikashvili, US Army, replaced General Jamerson as commander” (Ref. 679).

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

AIR WING

T.C.

DEPART

RETURN

Days at  Sea

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) -2nd & 3rd

SoLant        SocPac

2nd Cape Horn

EastPac

CVW-15

NL

18 Oct 1991

11 Dec 1991

South America

West Coast Transfer

18th FWFD

Home Port transfer to the West Coast

 

Ports of call included: ?

 

Squadrons: VF-51, F-14A; VF-111, F-14A; VFA-97, FA-18A; VFA-27, FA-18A; VA-52, A-6E/KA-6D; VAW-114, E-2C; HS-4, SH-60F/HH-60H; VAQ-134, EA-6B; VS-37, S-3A and VRC-50 Det., C-2A.

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) - 2nd, 6th, NAVCENT & 7th (1st Arabian

/ Persian Gulf & 1st voy. & 2nd North Arabian dep. and 2nd, 3rd & 4th North Arabian Sea voy.)

NorLant

7th Med

3rd Suez Canal

1st ODS

2nd Red Sea dep.

4th Suez Canal

Med

NorLant

CVW-7

AG

26 Sep 1991

2 Apr 1992

Europe

Middle East

1st Iraq War

13th FWFD

190-days

Teamwork 92 consisting of three phrases at the end of her deployment beginning with Freeplay, involving initial wing strikes; Frohavet, comprising long range anti-ship missions and TARPs runs supporting amphibious landings; and Vestfjord, including antisubmarine warfare, fjord antisurface operations, and engagements with a Dutch surface action group, her 1st Operation Desert Storm, the first Iraq War, PassEx, an air exercise with the Omanis, Eager Mace, an amphibious exercise with the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit and the Kuwaitis, Red Reef III, a joint U.S. and Saudi naval exercise in the Gulf of Oman and northern Arabian Sea, Neon Arrow, a joint aerial exercise with the Bahrainis, while Dwight D. Eisenhower will deploy five F-14Bs to Shaikh Isa, Bahrain, for Eager Archer, a joint strike exercise with the Kuwaitis, Beacon Flash with the Omanis in the northern Arabian Sea, Indigo Anvil and South Thunder with the Saudis in the south central Red Sea

 

Ports of call included:

 

Squadrons: VF-143, Pukin' Dogs, Fighter Squadron, F-14B; VF-142, Ghostriders, Fighter Squadron, F-14B; VFA-136, VFA-131, Knight Hawks, Strike Fighter Squadron, FA-18C(N) / NFA-18C; VA-34, Blue Blasters, Attack Squadron, A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D; VAW-121, Bluetails, Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron, E-2C; VAQ-140, Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron, EA-6B; HS-5, Night Dippers, Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron, SH-3H and VS-31, Top Cats, Air Anti-Submarine Squadron, S-3B.

 

USS Oklahoma City (SSN-723) joined USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) as part of her task force.

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) - 2nd & 7th (1st Arabian / Persian Gulf dep.)

SoLant

Cape Horn

SocPac

EastPac

17th Westpac

5th Indian Ocean

CVW-15

NL

1 Apr 1991

11 Dec 1991

Middle East

1st Iraq War

Red Sea

Indian Ocean

Persian Gulf

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) with CVW-15 embarked departed Philadelphia Naval Shipyard 1 April 1991, steaming through the South Atlantic operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet in the Atlantic around Cape Horn, steaming through the Southern and Eastern Pacific, transferring to the Pacific Fleet, on her 17th “Westpac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her fifth Indian Ocean deployment, her sixth Indian Ocean voyage and her second Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment in support of her first Operation Desert Storm commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991), operating under the direction of the U.S. Naval Forces Central Command where it remained following the war with Iraq (Operation Desert Storm), with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component commander for Central Command, with Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait). Upon conclusion of operations Kitty Hawk returned to San Diego, Calif., disembarking CVW-15 operating out of her home port at Naval Air Station Lemoore (1 April to 11 December 1991)” (Ref. 1-Kitty Hawk, 72, 325, 359 & 360).

USS Midway (CV-41) -

Relieved of it’s duties as a  forward deployed CV

Final and 43rd forward deployed deployment stationed out of Yokosuka, Japan

Sea of Japan

WestPac

CVW-5

NF

 

10 Aug

1991

14 Sep 1991

7th Fleet Homeport Transfer to West Coast - Japan to San Diego, Ca.

65th FWFD

36-days

USS Midway (CVA-41) with CVW-14

(Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) to West Coast via Pearl Harbor, Hawaii Transfer - 28 August to 14 September 1991)

(Japan to Hawaii – 10 to 22 August 1991)

(Hawaii to West Coast – 28 August to 14 September 1991)

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Carrier Air Wing Fourteen (CVW-14) embarked departed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii by the end of August 1991, for Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California, embarking CVW-14 operating out of her assigned home base in Calif., at San Diego, Calif., continuing her 65th deployment steaming from Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) via Pearl Harbor, Hawaii where she turned over with USS Independence (CV-62) which replaced Midway as the forward-deployed carrier in Yokosuka, Japan in August 1991, disembarking Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5), operating as a forward-deployed unit out of Atsugi Naval Air Station, Japan, since 1973, embarking CVW-14; making 41 deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet.

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Carrier Air Wing Fourteen (CVW-14) embarked arrived North Island Naval Air Station, San Diego, California by the end of August 1991, with Captain Larry Lee Ernst, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, ending her 65th deployment steaming from Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) via Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, where she turned over with USS Independence (CV-62) which replaced Midway as the forward-deployed carrier in Yokosuka, Japan in August 1991, disembarking Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5), operating as a forward-deployed unit out of Atsugi Naval Air Station, Japan, since 1973.

 

CVW-5 Squadrons: VFA-195, FA-18A; VFA-151, FA-18A; VFA-192, FA-18A; VA-185, A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VA-115, A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2C; VAQ-136, EA-6B and HS-12, SH-3H. *AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system), embarking CVW-14 Squadrons: VFA-151, F-14A; VFA-113, F-14A; VFA-25, F/A-18A; VA-185 (*1), F/A-18A; VA-196, A-6E; VAW-113, E-2C; HS-8, SH-3H; VAQ-139, EA-6B and VRC-30 Det., C-2A. (*1) disestablished on Aug.30, 1991.

USS Independence (CV-62) - 7th & Central Command

(3rd North Arabian Sea & 2nd Persian Gulf) (1st Forward Deployed)

Sea of Japan

CVW-5

NF

28 Aug  1991

5 Sep  1991

West Coast to 7th Fleet Homeport Transfer to San Diego to Japan

25th FWFD

35-days

West Coast Transfer - Hawaii to NAF Atsugi, Yokosuka, Japan

(28 August to 11 September 1991)

 

Ports of call included Pearl Harbor, Hawaii and Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan).

 

Captain Robert Lee Ellis, Jr., as Commanding Officer and Cdr/Captain Larry W. Nelms Executive Officer.

 

Squadrons: VF-154, F-14A; VF-21, F-14A; VFA-192, FA-18C; VFA-195, FA-18C; VA-115, A-6E; VAW-115, E-2C; HS-12, SH-3H; VAQ-136, EA-6B; VS-21, S-3B and VRC-50 Det., C-2A/US-3A.

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) - 2nd, 6th, NAVCENT & 7th (1st Arabian

/ Persian Gulf & 1st voy. & 2nd North Arabian dep. and 2nd, 3rd & 4th North Arabian Sea voy.)

NorLant

7th Med

3rd Suez Canal

1st ODS

2nd Red Sea dep.

4th Suez Canal

Med

NorLant

CVW-7

AG

26 Sep 1991

2 Apr 1992

Europe

Middle East

1st Iraq War

13th FWFD

190-days

 Teamwork 92 consisting of three phrases at the end of her deployment beginning with Freeplay, involving initial wing strikes; Frohavet, comprising long range anti-ship missions and TARPs runs supporting amphibious landings; and Vestfjord, including antisubmarine warfare, fjord antisurface operations, and engagements with a Dutch surface action group, her 1st Operation Desert Storm, the first Iraq War, PassEx, an air exercise with the Omanis, Eager Mace, an amphibious exercise with the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit and the Kuwaitis, Red Reef III, a joint U.S. and Saudi naval exercise in the Gulf of Oman and northern Arabian Sea, Neon Arrow, a joint aerial exercise with the Bahrainis, while Dwight D. Eisenhower will deploy five F-14Bs to Shaikh Isa, Bahrain, for Eager Archer, a joint strike exercise with the Kuwaitis, Beacon Flash with the Omanis in the northern Arabian Sea, Indigo Anvil and South Thunder with the Saudis in the south central Red Sea

 

Ports of call included:

 

Squadrons: VF-143, Pukin' Dogs, Fighter Squadron, F-14B; VF-142, Ghostriders, Fighter Squadron, F-14B; VFA-136, VFA-131, Knight Hawks, Strike Fighter Squadron, FA-18C(N) / NFA-18C; VA-34, Blue Blasters, Attack Squadron, A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D; VAW-121, Bluetails, Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron, E-2C; VAQ-140, Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron, EA-6B; HS-5, Night Dippers, Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron, SH-3H and VS-31, Top Cats, Air Anti-Submarine Squadron, S-3B.

 

USS Oklahoma City (SSN-723) joined USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) as part of her task force.

USS America (CVA-66) -

2nd, 6th, Central Command & 7th

(2nd Arabian / Persian Gulf dep. & 11th & 12th Red Sea, Gulf of Aden & Arabian Sea voy.)

NorLant

15th Med

11th Suez Canal

2nd Red Sea

2nd ODS

12th Suez Canal

Med

NorLant

CVW-1

AB

2 Dec 1991

6 Jun 1992

Europe

Middle East

1st Iraq War

27th FWFD

184-days

 

2nd Operation Desert Storm commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991 until 27 February 1992, when President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated and Operation Desert Storm would end at midnight) and Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait).

 

Ports visited not reported.

 

Squadrons: VF-102, F-14A; VF-33 (*1), F-14A; VFA-82, FA-18C; VFA-86, FA-18C; VA-85, A-6E / KA-6D; VAW-123, E-2C; HS-11, SH-3H; VAQ-137, EA-6B and VS-32, S-3B.

 

(*1) disestablished on Oct.1, 1993.

Air Anti-Submarine Squadron redesignated Sea Control Squadron in 1993.

 

USS Simpson (FFG-56) was part of USS America (CV-66) battle group.

 

1400 combat flight hours

http://www.topedge.com/alley/squadron/lant/vf102his.htm

 

1992

 

“In April 1992, the Iraqi government sponsored an assassination attempt on President Bush during his visit to Kuwait” (Ref. 457).

“On 26 August 1992, President George H. W. Bush announced that the United States and its allies had informed Iraq that in 24 hours Allied aircraft would fly surveillance missions in southern Iraq and were prepared to shoot down any Iraqi aircraft flying south of the 32nd parallel. The action was precipitated by Iraq's failure to comply with U.N. Resolution 688 which demanded that the Iraqi government stop the repression of its Shiite population in southern Iraq , a decision by a coalition of U.N. forces to begin” (Ref. 1 Independence 72 & 457).

 

“The goal was to ensure Iraq’s compliance with UNSCR 688. To facilitate the monitoring, the coalition barred all Iraqi fixed and rotary wing aircraft from flying over the surveillance area. With the president’s announcement, U.S. Central Command activated Joint Task Force Southwest Asia, a command and control unit for coalition forces monitoring the no-fly zone. The mission was dubbed Operation Southern Watch. The first Southern Watch sortie was flown Aug. 27, 1992 - less than 24 hours after the announcement” (Ref. 457).

“Persian Gulf allies began to enforce the ban on Iraqi planes from flying south of the 32nd parallel on 27 August 1992 in Operation Southern Watch. Any Iraqi planes that violated the ban would be shot down. Twenty Navy aircraft from CVW-5 aboard Independence in the Persian Gulf were the first coalition aircraft on station over Iraq as Operation Southern Watch began. Southern Watch was the enforcement of a ban on Iraqi warplanes and helicopters from flying south of the 32nd parallel” (Ref. 1 Independence & 72).

 

Operation Southern Watch

 

United Nations Security Council Resolution 688, passed in April 1991, demanded that Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein end the repression of the Iraqi civilian population. Iraqi military bombing and strafing attacks against the Shi’ite Muslims in Southern Iraq during the remainder of 1991and during 1992 indicated Hussein chose not to comply with the U.N. resolution” (Ref. 457).

 

Operation Southern Watch

 

“A No-Fly Zone was established by the U.S., the U.K. and France north of the 36th parallel. This was enforced by American and British aircraft. Also included in this effort was the delivery of humanitarian relief and military protection of the Kurds by a small American ground force based in Turkey” (Ref. 453).

 

“On 26 August 1992, President George H. W. Bush announced that the United States and its allies had informed Iraq that in 24 hours Allied aircraft would fly surveillance missions in southern Iraq and were prepared to shoot down any Iraqi aircraft flying south of the 32nd parallel. The action was precipitated by Iraq's failure to comply with U.N. Resolution 688 which demanded that the Iraqi government stop the repression of its Shiite population in southern Iraq” (Ref. 1 Independence & 72).

 

“Persian Gulf allies began to enforce the ban on Iraqi planes from flying south of the 32nd parallel on 27 August 1992 in Operation Southern Watch. Any Iraqi planes that violated the ban would be shot down. Twenty Navy aircraft from CVW-5 aboard Independence in the Persian Gulf were the first coalition aircraft on station over Iraq as Operation Southern Watch began. Southern Watch was the enforcement of a ban on Iraqi warplanes and helicopters from flying south of the 32nd parallel” (Ref. 1 Independence & 72).

 

Operation Deny Flight enforced the no-fly zone, provided close air support to UN troops, and conducted approved air strikes under a "dual-key" command arrangement with the UN. NATO Airborne Early Warning and Control (AWACS) aircraft began monitoring operations in October 1992, in support of UN Security Council Resolution 781, which established a no-fly zone over Bosnia-Herzegovina. Data on possible violations of the no-fly zone has been passed to the appropriate UN authorities on a regular basis” (Ref. 540).

 

Operation Southern Watch

 

“At first, Iraq complied with the no-fly restriction, but Hussein began challenging Southern Watch operations after the UN’s decision to retain sanctions against Iraq, Nov. 24, 1992” (Ref. 457).

 

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/ops/images/020930-d-6570c-006.jpg

 

NATO Operation Maritime Guard ALLIED FORCES SOUTHERN EUROPE Fact Sheet

 

“The North Atlantic Council met on 20 November 1992 to follow up its earlier decision in principle to support UN Security Council resolution 787 aimed at enforcing the UN embargoes in the former Yugoslavia. The Council agreed that enforcement operations by NATO maritime forces could commence, in co-ordination with WEU forces in the Adriatic” (Ref. 1141).

 

WEU Operation "Sharp Fence" and was directed by the Commander-in-Chief Allied Forces Southern Europe, US Admiral Mike Boorda in Naples. It followed the NATO operation "Maritime Monitor", conducted from 16 July to 22 November 1992” (Ref. 1142).

“Subsequently the Defense Planning Committee met to authorize the forces of NATO's integrated military structure to carry out the enforcement and to endorse the operational concept proposed by alliance military authorities for NATO's Standing Naval Force Mediterranean (STANAVFORMED).

 

The Supreme Allied Commander Europe directed NATO naval, maritime and air forces to commence enforcing the embargoes on 22 November 1992, at 1600 GMT. The first ever NATO operation of this kind was started then, with the name "MARITIME GUARD". This operation was coordinated with WEU forces (WEU Operation "Sharp Fence"), and was directed by the Commander-in-Chief Allied Forces Southern Europe, US Admiral Mike Boorda in Naples. It followed the NATO operation "Maritime Monitor", conducted from 16 July to 22 November 1992.

 

In order to enforce strict compliance with the terms of Security Council resolutions 713 and 757, all ships bound to or from the territorial waters of Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro) were halted to inspect and verify their cargoes and destinations, as well as all ships proceeding to all other ports of the former Yugoslavia” (Ref. 1141).

 

STANAVFORMED started patrols under operation "MARITIME GUARD" in an area in International waters off the Montenegro coast, while the WEU forces patrolled the Otranto Straits in international waters within operation "SHARP FENCE". The two forces have swapped patrol areas periodically since 29 December 1992.

 

In addition to the NATO ships, airborne radar and maritime patrol aircraft participated in the NATO operation. NATO airborne radar aircraft provided an air/sea picture to all the NATO and WEU units operating in the Adriatic Sea and in the Otranto Channel. French aircraft operating under the auspices of the WEU contributed to this effort. This picture was further integrated with the surveillance continuously provided by NATO and WEU maritime patrol aircraft (MPA), which helps in locating and identifying the ships for inspection. British, US, and Portuguese MPA aircraft operated under NATO control. Additionally, Greek MPA aircraft flew patrols south of the Otranto Channel in support of NATO and WEU forces.

 

NATO and French airborne radar aircraft, concurrent with the assistance to Maritime Guard forces, continued their monitoring operations in support of UN Security Council Resolution 781, which established a ban on military flights in the air space of Bosnia-Herzegovina. This aspect of the combined operation was called operation "SKY MONITOR"” (Ref. 1141).

 

Operation Southern Watch

 

“A U.S. Air Force F-16 on patrol in the no-fly zone Dec. 27, 1992, encountered a MiG-25 Foxbat. When the MiG pilot locked his air-to-air radar on the F-16, the American pilot destroyed the Foxbat with an air-to-air missile. Shortly after the shoot down, Hussein positioned surface-to-air missiles in Southern Iraq below the 32nd parallel. Since these missiles threatened pilots flying Southern Watch missions, the coalition ordered Hussein to move them above the 32nd parallel. Hussein ignored the ultimatum, even after warnings from the U.N.” (Ref. 457).

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

AIR WING

T.C.

DEPART

RETURN

Days at  Sea

USS Saratoga (CV-60) -

2nd, 6th, Central Command & 7th

(1st Arabian Sea/Gulf (Persian Gulf) and 3rd & 4th Arabian Sea, 6th & 7th Red Sea & 4th & 5th Gulf of Aden)

NoLant

21st Med

Adriatic Sea

9th Suez Canal

1st OSW

10th Suez Canal

Med

NoLant

CVW-17

AA

6 May 1992

28 Nov 1992

Europe

Middle East

Iraq no Fly Zone

Persian Gulf

 

“USS Saratoga (CV-60) with CVW-17 embarked departed Mayport, Florida 6 May 1992, on her 21st Mediterranean Sea (26th & 27th Med voyage) and first Adriatic Sea deployment, an arm of the Med operating with the 6th Fleet, where she provided close-air support for humanitarian relief flights flying into the war-torn former Yugoslavia, flying thousands of support missions with out dropping a single piece of ordnance, proving that U.S. military presence is a powerful deterrent, steaming through the North Atlantic, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, en route to the Mediterranean Sea, making her ninth Suez Canal transit, entering the Red Sea, on her 6th Red Sea voyage and 4th Gulf of Aden voyage, steaming through the Gulf of Aden to the Arabian Sea (3rd voyage since her Indian Ocean deployment), on her first Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment in support of her 1st Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq, shooting down any Iraqi warplanes violating that airspace while preventing the Iraqis from attacking Shiite Moslem ethnic groups in the marshes of southern Iraq, operating under operational control of the US Naval Forces Central Command, operational control of the Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment, Red Sea, and Arabian Sea, headquartered in Manama, Bahrain in July 1995, while U.S. Naval Forces Central Command operational control extends to the Indian Ocean following the war with Iraq (Operation Desert Storm), with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component commander for Central Command, with the beginning of Operation Southern Watch commencing 26 August 1992, (when President George H. W. Bush announced that the United States and its allies had informed Iraq that in 24 hours Allied aircraft would fly surveillance missions in southern Iraq and were prepared to shoot down any Iraqi aircraft flying south of the 32nd parallel, while President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated at 9 p.m. EST 27 February 1992, flight operations ending at midnight), with Operation Desert Storm commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991 until 27 February 1992, when President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated and Operation Desert Storm would end at midnight) and Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait). On 27 August, aircraft from Saratoga and USS Independence (CV 62), both in the Arabian Gulf, began enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq under Operation Southern Watch. Any Iraqi warplanes violating that airspace would be shot down. This was to prevent the Iraqis from attacking Shiite Muslim ethnic groups in the marshes of southern Iraq. In the fall of 1992, the United States, Turkey, and several other NATO members participated in "Exercise Display Determination 1992," a combined forces naval exercise under the overall command of Admiral Jeremy Michael Boorda of the United States Navy, when on 1 October 1992 the Combat Direction Center Officer aboard Saratoga decided to launch a simulated attack on nearby opposition forces utilizing the Sea Sparrow missile system and after securing the approval of Saratoga Commanding Officer and the Battle Group Commander, the Combat Direction Center Officer implemented the simulated assault plan. The Battle Group Commander woke up the enlisted Sea Sparrow missile team without providing prior notice and directed them to conduct the simulated attack (certain members of the missile firing team were not told that the exercise was a drill, rather than an actual event), which resulted in tragedy when due to the absence of standard terminology between the missile system operator and officers supervising the drill, fired two live Sea Sparrow missiles at Muavenet, hitting the bridge, destroying it and the Combat Information Center, killing most of the Turkish ship's officers. From the Gulf, Saratoga returned to the Mediterranean Sea steaming through the Arabian Sea (4th voyage), Gulf of Aden en route to the Suez Canal via the Red Sea, on her 7th Red Sea voyage and 5th Gulf of Aden voyage, making her tenth Suez Canal transit, entering the Mediterranean Sea (27th Med voyage) and was there relieved on 7 October by USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) and then steamed through the North Atlantic, operating with the United States Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, steaming South on her way home (6 May to 6 November 1992)” (Ref. 1-Saratoga & 72).

 

1993

 

Operation Southern Watch

 

 “On Jan. 6, 1993, four U.N. allies, the United States, Russia, France and the United Kingdom, agreed to work together in enforcing UNSCR 688. A week later, coalition aircraft destroyed surface to air missile sites and their command and control units in Southern Iraq. In addition to this action, on Jan. 17 coalition naval forces disabled an Iraqi nuclear facility with Tomahawk cruise missiles in support of UNSCR 687, the resolution demanding the destruction of all Iraqi weapons of mass destruction. The following day, the allies launched a successful air raid against Iraqi SAM systems below the 32nd parallel. Three months later, on April 18, 1993, a coalition F-4G aircraft fired a missile into an Iraqi anti-aircraft position after being illuminated by radar from that site” (Ref. 457).

 

Operation Deny Flight

 

“On 31 March 1993, the UN Security Council passed Resolution 816 authorising enforcement of the no-fly zone over Bosnia-Herzegovina and extending the ban to cover flights by all fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft except those authorized by UNPROFOR. In the event of further violations, it authorized UN member states to take all necessary measures to ensure compliance” (Ref. 540).

 

“An enforcement operation, called "Deny Flight", began on 12 April 1993. It initially involved some 50 fighter and reconnaissance aircraft (later increased to over 100) from various Alliance nations, flying from airbases in Italy and from aircraft carriers in the Adriatic” (Ref. 540).

 

“In June 1993, NATO Foreign Ministers decided to offer protective air power for the United Nations Protection Force (UNPROFOR) in the performance of its overall mandate” (Ref. 540).

 

Operation Southern Watch

 

“In April 1992, the Iraqi government sponsored an assassination attempt on President Bush during his visit to Kuwait. This plot prompted a unilateral U.S. Tomahawk missile strike June 26, 1993” (Ref. 457).

 

Operation Deny Flight

 

“In July 1993, NATO aircraft began flying training missions for providing such Close Air Support (CAS)” (Ref. 540).

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

AIR WING

T.C.

DEPART

RETURN

Days at  Sea

USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) -\2nd, 6th & Central Command

(3rd Red Sea)

NoLant

3rd Med

1st ODF

1st ODF

1st Adriatic

3rd Suez Canal

2nd Red Sea

1st OSW

4th Suez Canal

Med

NoLant

CVW-8

AJ

11 Mar 1993

8 Sep 1993

Europe

Middle East

Iraq no Fly Zone

4th FWFD

182-days

1st Operation Deny Flight in the U.S. no-fly zone over Bosnia and her 1st Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq.

 

Ports of call include: Rhodes, Greece; Naples, Italy and Corfu, Greece.

 

Squadrons: VF-84 (*1) (F-14A); VFA-15 (F/A-18C); VMFA-312 (F/A-18C); VFA-87 (F/A-18C); VA-36 (*2) (A-6E); VAW-124 (E-2C); VAQ-141 (EA-6B); HS-3 (HH/SH-60H/F) and HMH-362 (CH-53D and UH-1N).

 

(*1) VF-84 disestablished on Oct. 1, 1995
(*2) VA-36 disestablished on Apr. 1, 1994

 

USS Hue City (CG-66); USS Richmond K. Turner (CG-20) and USS Arleigh Burke (DDG-51) joined USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) as part of her task force.

USS Constellation (CV-64) - 2nd, 3rd & Pacific Fleet

WestLant SoLant

Cape Horn

SocPac

EastPac

CVW-2

NE

27 May 1993

22 Jul 1993

Transfer to the West Coast

23rd FWFD

87-days

USS Constellation (CV-64) departed Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Pa. 27 May 1993, conducting her post-SLEP shakedown with a number of CVW-17 squadrons embarked (March 4 to April 8, 1993), returning to Norfolk, Va., then sailed for Mayport, Fla. 29 May 1993, where she embarked CVW-2, on her East to West coast transfer, steaming through the Southern Atlantic, operating with the United States Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, around Cape Horn, conducting exercises with various South American air forces, while en route to San Diego, Calif. Through the Eastern Pacific; completing of a three-year Service Life Extension Program (SLEP) at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Pa. (July 1990 to 3 March 1993), the fifth and last carrier to complete SLEP, which was a cross between new construction and a comprehensive overhaul ($800-million), designed to add 15 years to the carrier’s operational life, with upgrades to virtually every system on the ship (27 May to 22 July 1993)” (Ref. 1-Constellation & 72).

 

Squadrons: VF-151, FA-18C (N); VF-137, FA-18C (N); VA-145, A-6E; VAW-113, E-2C; VRC-30 Det., EA-6B; HS-14, SH-3H; VS-37, S-3B; VRC-30 Det., C-2A and HC-11 Det., CH-46D.

USS America (CVA-66) -

2nd, 6th, Central Command & 7th

(13th & 14th Red Sea, Gulf of Aden & Arabian Sea voy.)

NorLant

16th Med

ODF

PP & SG

3rd Adriatic Sea

13th Suez Canal

3rd Red Sea

1st OSW

5th Indian Ocean

OCH

UNISOM-II in Somalia

14th Suez Canal

Med

NorLant

CVW-1

AB

11 Aug 1993

5 Feb 1994

Europe

Bosnia-Herzegovina,

Middle East

Iraq War no Fly Zone

African nation of Somalia

28th FWFD

179-days

Operation Deny Flight, Provide Promise and Sharp Guard, supporting United Nations peacekeeping efforts over Bosnia, Operation Continue Hope, UNISOM-II in Somalia, supporting the U.N humanitarian efforts in Somalia was the Naval Battle Force Somalia, commanded by Rear Adm. Arthur Cebrowski, Commander, Carrier Group Six embarked in America and 1st Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq.

 

Ports visited not reported.

 

Squadrons: VF-102, F-14A; VF-33 (*1), F-14A; VFA-82, FA-18C; VFA-86, FA-18C; VA-85 (*2), A-6E / KA-6D; VAW-123, E-2C; HS-11, SH-3H; VAQ-137 (*3), EA-6B; VS-32, S-3B; VRC-40 Det. 3, C-2A and HMM-162 Det. A, CH-46E.

 

(*1) disestablished on Sep.30, 1994.

(*2) disestablished on Sep.30, 1994.

(*3 disestablished on May 26, 1994.

 

USS Normandy (CG-60) and USS Simpson (FFG-56) were part of USS America (CV-66) Joint Task Group” (Ref. 84A).

VS-32 http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/vs-32.htm

 

The new US Navy air wing concept

http://www.topedge.com/alley/squadron/lant/vf102his.htm

http://www.anft.net/f-14/f14-squadron-vf102.htm

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS RECORD OF

EAST/WEST COAST TRANSFERS AND TRANSITS

(Panama Canal, Cape Horn, Cape of Good Hope and Suez Canal)

 

Summary Total - September 1945 to Present

 

U. S. Aircraft Carrier Deployments and or both Panama Canal, Cape Horn, Cape of Good Hope and Suez Canal Transits and East /West Coast Transfers

Panama Canal, Cape Horn, Cape of Good Hope and Suez Canal Transits and East Coast/West Coast Transfers

 

Part I of VIII – 1928 to 1945

Part II of VIII – 1946 to 1969

Part III of VIII – 1970 to 1989

Part IV of VIII – 1990 to 1993

Part V of VIII – 1994 to 2000

Part VI of VIII – 2001 to 2005

Part VII of VIII – 2006 to 2012

Part VIII of VIII – 2013 to Present

 

 

USS Saratoga (CV-60) -

2nd, 6th, Central Command & 7th

(1st Arabian Sea/Gulf (Persian Gulf) and 3rd & 4th Arabian Sea, 6th & 7th Red Sea & 4th & 5th Gulf of Aden)

NoLant

21st Med

Adriatic Sea

9th Suez Canal

1st OSW

10th Suez Canal

Med

NoLant

CVW-17

AA

6 May 1992

28 Nov 1992

Days at  Sea

“USS Saratoga (CV-60) with CVW-17 embarked departed Mayport, Florida 6 May 1992, on her 21st Mediterranean Sea (26th & 27th Med voyage) and first Adriatic Sea deployment, an arm of the Med operating with the 6th Fleet, where she provided close-air support for humanitarian relief flights flying into the war-torn former Yugoslavia, flying thousands of support missions with out dropping a single piece of ordnance, proving that U.S. military presence is a powerful deterrent, steaming through the North Atlantic, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, en route to the Mediterranean Sea, making her ninth Suez Canal transit, entering the Red Sea, on her 6th Red Sea voyage and 4th Gulf of Aden voyage, steaming through the Gulf of Aden to the Arabian Sea (3rd voyage since her Indian Ocean deployment), on her first Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment in support of her 1st Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq, shooting down any Iraqi warplanes violating that airspace while preventing the Iraqis from attacking Shiite Moslem ethnic groups in the marshes of southern Iraq, operating under operational control of the US Naval Forces Central Command, operational control of the Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment, Red Sea, and Arabian Sea, headquartered in Manama, Bahrain in July 1995, while U.S. Naval Forces Central Command operational control extends to the Indian Ocean following the war with Iraq (Operation Desert Storm), with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component commander for Central Command, with the beginning of Operation Southern Watch commencing 26 August 1992, (when President George H. W. Bush announced that the United States and its allies had informed Iraq that in 24 hours Allied aircraft would fly surveillance missions in southern Iraq and were prepared to shoot down any Iraqi aircraft flying south of the 32nd parallel, while President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated at 9 p.m. EST 27 February 1992, flight operations ending at midnight), with Operation Desert Storm commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991 until 27 February 1992, when President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated and Operation Desert Storm would end at midnight) and Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait). On 27 August, aircraft from Saratoga and USS Independence (CV 62), both in the Arabian Gulf, began enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq under Operation Southern Watch. Any Iraqi warplanes violating that airspace would be shot down. This was to prevent the Iraqis from attacking Shiite Muslim ethnic groups in the marshes of southern Iraq. In the fall of 1992, the United States, Turkey, and several other NATO members participated in "Exercise Display Determination 1992," a combined forces naval exercise under the overall command of Admiral Jeremy Michael Boorda of the United States Navy, when on 1 October 1992 the Combat Direction Center Officer aboard Saratoga decided to launch a simulated attack on nearby opposition forces utilizing the Sea Sparrow missile system and after securing the approval of Saratoga Commanding Officer and the Battle Group Commander, the Combat Direction Center Officer implemented the simulated assault plan. The Battle Group Commander woke up the enlisted Sea Sparrow missile team without providing prior notice and directed them to conduct the simulated attack (certain members of the missile firing team were not told that the exercise was a drill, rather than an actual event), which resulted in tragedy when due to the absence of standard terminology between the missile system operator and officers supervising the drill, fired two live Sea Sparrow missiles at Muavenet, hitting the bridge, destroying it and the Combat Information Center, killing most of the Turkish ship's officers. From the Gulf, Saratoga returned to the Mediterranean Sea steaming through the Arabian Sea (4th voyage), Gulf of Aden en route to the Suez Canal via the Red Sea, on her 7th Red Sea voyage and 5th Gulf of Aden voyage, making her tenth Suez Canal transit, entering the Mediterranean Sea (27th Med voyage) and was there relieved on 7 October by USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) and then steamed through the North Atlantic, operating with the United States Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, steaming South on her way home (6 May to 6 November 1992)” (Ref. 1-Saratoga & 72).

“USS Saratoga (CV-60) with CVW-17 embarked departed Mayport, Florida 6 May 1992, on her 21st Mediterranean Sea (26th & 27th Med voyage) and first Adriatic Sea deployment, an arm of the Med operating with the 6th Fleet, where she provided close-air support for humanitarian relief flights flying into the war-torn former Yugoslavia, flying thousands of support missions with out dropping a single piece of ordnance, proving that U.S. military presence is a powerful deterrent, steaming through the North Atlantic, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, en route to the Mediterranean Sea, making her ninth Suez Canal transit, entering the Red Sea, on her 6th Red Sea voyage and 4th Gulf of Aden voyage, steaming through the Gulf of Aden to the Arabian Sea (3rd voyage since her Indian Ocean deployment), on her first Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment in support of her 1st Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq, shooting down any Iraqi warplanes violating that airspace while preventing the Iraqis from attacking Shiite Moslem ethnic groups in the marshes of southern Iraq, operating under operational control of the US Naval Forces Central Command, operational control of the Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment, Red Sea, and Arabian Sea, headquartered in Manama, Bahrain in July 1995, while U.S. Naval Forces Central Command operational control extends to the Indian Ocean following the war with Iraq (Operation Desert Storm), with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component commander for Central Command, with the beginning of Operation Southern Watch commencing 26 August 1992, (when President George H. W. Bush announced that the United States and its allies had informed Iraq that in 24 hours Allied aircraft would fly surveillance missions in southern Iraq and were prepared to shoot down any Iraqi aircraft flying south of the 32nd parallel, while President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated at 9 p.m. EST 27 February 1992, flight operations ending at midnight), with Operation Desert Storm commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991 until 27 February 1992, when President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated and Operation Desert Storm would end at midnight) and Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait). On 27 August, aircraft from Saratoga and USS Independence (CV 62), both in the Arabian Gulf, began enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq under Operation Southern Watch. Any Iraqi warplanes violating that airspace would be shot down. This was to prevent the Iraqis from attacking Shiite Muslim ethnic groups in the marshes of southern Iraq. In the fall of 1992, the United States, Turkey, and several other NATO members participated in "Exercise Display Determination 1992," a combined forces naval exercise under the overall command of Admiral Jeremy Michael Boorda of the United States Navy, when on 1 October 1992 the Combat Direction Center Officer aboard Saratoga decided to launch a simulated attack on nearby opposition forces utilizing the Sea Sparrow missile system and after securing the approval of Saratoga Commanding Officer and the Battle Group Commander, the Combat Direction Center Officer implemented the simulated assault plan. The Battle Group Commander woke up the enlisted Sea Sparrow missile team without providing prior notice and directed them to conduct the simulated attack (certain members of the missile firing team were not told that the exercise was a drill, rather than an actual event), which resulted in tragedy when due to the absence of standard terminology between the missile system operator and officers supervising the drill, fired two live Sea Sparrow missiles at Muavenet, hitting the bridge, destroying it and the Combat Information Center, killing most of the Turkish ship's officers. From the Gulf, Saratoga returned to the Mediterranean Sea steaming through the Arabian Sea (4th voyage), Gulf of Aden en route to the Suez Canal via the Red Sea, on her 7th Red Sea voyage and 5th Gulf of Aden voyage, making her tenth Suez Canal transit, entering the Mediterranean Sea (27th Med voyage) and was there relieved on 7 October by USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) and then steamed through the North Atlantic, operating with the United States Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, steaming South on her way home (6 May to 6 November 1992)” (Ref. 1-Saratoga & 72).

“USS Saratoga (CV-60) with CVW-17 embarked departed Mayport, Florida 6 May 1992, on her 21st Mediterranean Sea (26th & 27th Med voyage) and first Adriatic Sea deployment, an arm of the Med operating with the 6th Fleet, where she provided close-air support for humanitarian relief flights flying into the war-torn former Yugoslavia, flying thousands of support missions with out dropping a single piece of ordnance, proving that U.S. military presence is a powerful deterrent, steaming through the North Atlantic, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, en route to the Mediterranean Sea, making her ninth Suez Canal transit, entering the Red Sea, on her 6th Red Sea voyage and 4th Gulf of Aden voyage, steaming through the Gulf of Aden to the Arabian Sea (3rd voyage since her Indian Ocean deployment), on her first Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment in support of her 1st Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq, shooting down any Iraqi warplanes violating that airspace while preventing the Iraqis from attacking Shiite Moslem ethnic groups in the marshes of southern Iraq, operating under operational control of the US Naval Forces Central Command, operational control of the Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment, Red Sea, and Arabian Sea, headquartered in Manama, Bahrain in July 1995, while U.S. Naval Forces Central Command operational control extends to the Indian Ocean following the war with Iraq (Operation Desert Storm), with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component commander for Central Command, with the beginning of Operation Southern Watch commencing 26 August 1992, (when President George H. W. Bush announced that the United States and its allies had informed Iraq that in 24 hours Allied aircraft would fly surveillance missions in southern Iraq and were prepared to shoot down any Iraqi aircraft flying south of the 32nd parallel, while President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated at 9 p.m. EST 27 February 1992, flight operations ending at midnight), with Operation Desert Storm commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991 until 27 February 1992, when President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated and Operation Desert Storm would end at midnight) and Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait). On 27 August, aircraft from Saratoga and USS Independence (CV 62), both in the Arabian Gulf, began enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq under Operation Southern Watch. Any Iraqi warplanes violating that airspace would be shot down. This was to prevent the Iraqis from attacking Shiite Muslim ethnic groups in the marshes of southern Iraq. In the fall of 1992, the United States, Turkey, and several other NATO members participated in "Exercise Display Determination 1992," a combined forces naval exercise under the overall command of Admiral Jeremy Michael Boorda of the United States Navy, when on 1 October 1992 the Combat Direction Center Officer aboard Saratoga decided to launch a simulated attack on nearby opposition forces utilizing the Sea Sparrow missile system and after securing the approval of Saratoga Commanding Officer and the Battle Group Commander, the Combat Direction Center Officer implemented the simulated assault plan. The Battle Group Commander woke up the enlisted Sea Sparrow missile team without providing prior notice and directed them to conduct the simulated attack (certain members of the missile firing team were not told that the exercise was a drill, rather than an actual event), which resulted in tragedy when due to the absence of standard terminology between the missile system operator and officers supervising the drill, fired two live Sea Sparrow missiles at Muavenet, hitting the bridge, destroying it and the Combat Information Center, killing most of the Turkish ship's officers. From the Gulf, Saratoga returned to the Mediterranean Sea steaming through the Arabian Sea (4th voyage), Gulf of Aden en route to the Suez Canal via the Red Sea, on her 7th Red Sea voyage and 5th Gulf of Aden voyage, making her tenth Suez Canal transit, entering the Mediterranean Sea (27th Med voyage) and was there relieved on 7 October by USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) and then steamed through the North Atlantic, operating with the United States Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, steaming South on her way home (6 May to 6 November 1992)” (Ref. 1-Saratoga & 72).

“USS Saratoga (CV-60) with CVW-17 embarked departed Mayport, Florida 6 May 1992, on her 21st Mediterranean Sea (26th & 27th Med voyage) and first Adriatic Sea deployment, an arm of the Med operating with the 6th Fleet, where she provided close-air support for humanitarian relief flights flying into the war-torn former Yugoslavia, flying thousands of support missions with out dropping a single piece of ordnance, proving that U.S. military presence is a powerful deterrent, steaming through the North Atlantic, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, en route to the Mediterranean Sea, making her ninth Suez Canal transit, entering the Red Sea, on her 6th Red Sea voyage and 4th Gulf of Aden voyage, steaming through the Gulf of Aden to the Arabian Sea (3rd voyage since her Indian Ocean deployment), on her first Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment in support of her 1st Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq, shooting down any Iraqi warplanes violating that airspace while preventing the Iraqis from attacking Shiite Moslem ethnic groups in the marshes of southern Iraq, operating under operational control of the US Naval Forces Central Command, operational control of the Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment, Red Sea, and Arabian Sea, headquartered in Manama, Bahrain in July 1995, while U.S. Naval Forces Central Command operational control extends to the Indian Ocean following the war with Iraq (Operation Desert Storm), with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component commander for Central Command, with the beginning of Operation Southern Watch commencing 26 August 1992, (when President George H. W. Bush announced that the United States and its allies had informed Iraq that in 24 hours Allied aircraft would fly surveillance missions in southern Iraq and were prepared to shoot down any Iraqi aircraft flying south of the 32nd parallel, while President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated at 9 p.m. EST 27 February 1992, flight operations ending at midnight), with Operation Desert Storm commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991 until 27 February 1992, when President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated and Operation Desert Storm would end at midnight) and Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait). On 27 August, aircraft from Saratoga and USS Independence (CV 62), both in the Arabian Gulf, began enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq under Operation Southern Watch. Any Iraqi warplanes violating that airspace would be shot down. This was to prevent the Iraqis from attacking Shiite Muslim ethnic groups in the marshes of southern Iraq. In the fall of 1992, the United States, Turkey, and several other NATO members participated in "Exercise Display Determination 1992," a combined forces naval exercise under the overall command of Admiral Jeremy Michael Boorda of the United States Navy, when on 1 October 1992 the Combat Direction Center Officer aboard Saratoga decided to launch a simulated attack on nearby opposition forces utilizing the Sea Sparrow missile system and after securing the approval of Saratoga Commanding Officer and the Battle Group Commander, the Combat Direction Center Officer implemented the simulated assault plan. The Battle Group Commander woke up the enlisted Sea Sparrow missile team without providing prior notice and directed them to conduct the simulated attack (certain members of the missile firing team were not told that the exercise was a drill, rather than an actual event), which resulted in tragedy when due to the absence of standard terminology between the missile system operator and officers supervising the drill, fired two live Sea Sparrow missiles at Muavenet, hitting the bridge, destroying it and the Combat Information Center, killing most of the Turkish ship's officers. From the Gulf, Saratoga returned to the Mediterranean Sea steaming through the Arabian Sea (4th voyage), Gulf of Aden en route to the Suez Canal via the Red Sea, on her 7th Red Sea voyage and 5th Gulf of Aden voyage, making her tenth Suez Canal transit, entering the Mediterranean Sea (27th Med voyage) and was there relieved on 7 October by USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) and then steamed through the North Atlantic, operating with the United States Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, steaming South on her way home (6 May to 6 November 1992)” (Ref. 1-Saratoga & 72).

“USS Saratoga (CV-60) with CVW-17 embarked departed Mayport, Florida 6 May 1992, on her 21st Mediterranean Sea (26th & 27th Med voyage) and first Adriatic Sea deployment, an arm of the Med operating with the 6th Fleet, where she provided close-air support for humanitarian relief flights flying into the war-torn former Yugoslavia, flying thousands of support missions with out dropping a single piece of ordnance, proving that U.S. military presence is a powerful deterrent, steaming through the North Atlantic, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, en route to the Mediterranean Sea, making her ninth Suez Canal transit, entering the Red Sea, on her 6th Red Sea voyage and 4th Gulf of Aden voyage, steaming through the Gulf of Aden to the Arabian Sea (3rd voyage since her Indian Ocean deployment), on her first Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment in support of her 1st Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq, shooting down any Iraqi warplanes violating that airspace while preventing the Iraqis from attacking Shiite Moslem ethnic groups in the marshes of southern Iraq, operating under operational control of the US Naval Forces Central Command, operational control of the Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment, Red Sea, and Arabian Sea, headquartered in Manama, Bahrain in July 1995, while U.S. Naval Forces Central Command operational control extends to the Indian Ocean following the war with Iraq (Operation Desert Storm), with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component commander for Central Command, with the beginning of Operation Southern Watch commencing 26 August 1992, (when President George H. W. Bush announced that the United States and its allies had informed Iraq that in 24 hours Allied aircraft would fly surveillance missions in southern Iraq and were prepared to shoot down any Iraqi aircraft flying south of the 32nd parallel, while President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated at 9 p.m. EST 27 February 1992, flight operations ending at midnight), with Operation Desert Storm commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991 until 27 February 1992, when President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated and Operation Desert Storm would end at midnight) and Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait). On 27 August, aircraft from Saratoga and USS Independence (CV 62), both in the Arabian Gulf, began enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq under Operation Southern Watch. Any Iraqi warplanes violating that airspace would be shot down. This was to prevent the Iraqis from attacking Shiite Muslim ethnic groups in the marshes of southern Iraq. In the fall of 1992, the United States, Turkey, and several other NATO members participated in "Exercise Display Determination 1992," a combined forces naval exercise under the overall command of Admiral Jeremy Michael Boorda of the United States Navy, when on 1 October 1992 the Combat Direction Center Officer aboard Saratoga decided to launch a simulated attack on nearby opposition forces utilizing the Sea Sparrow missile system and after securing the approval of Saratoga Commanding Officer and the Battle Group Commander, the Combat Direction Center Officer implemented the simulated assault plan. The Battle Group Commander woke up the enlisted Sea Sparrow missile team without providing prior notice and directed them to conduct the simulated attack (certain members of the missile firing team were not told that the exercise was a drill, rather than an actual event), which resulted in tragedy when due to the absence of standard terminology between the missile system operator and officers supervising the drill, fired two live Sea Sparrow missiles at Muavenet, hitting the bridge, destroying it and the Combat Information Center, killing most of the Turkish ship's officers. From the Gulf, Saratoga returned to the Mediterranean Sea steaming through the Arabian Sea (4th voyage), Gulf of Aden en route to the Suez Canal via the Red Sea, on her 7th Red Sea voyage and 5th Gulf of Aden voyage, making her tenth Suez Canal transit, entering the Mediterranean Sea (27th Med voyage) and was there relieved on 7 October by USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) and then steamed through the North Atlantic, operating with the United States Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, steaming South on her way home (6 May to 6 November 1992)” (Ref. 1-Saratoga & 72).

“USS Saratoga (CV-60) with CVW-17 embarked departed Mayport, Florida 6 May 1992, on her 21st Mediterranean Sea (26th & 27th Med voyage) and first Adriatic Sea deployment, an arm of the Med operating with the 6th Fleet, where she provided close-air support for humanitarian relief flights flying into the war-torn former Yugoslavia, flying thousands of support missions with out dropping a single piece of ordnance, proving that U.S. military presence is a powerful deterrent, steaming through the North Atlantic, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, en route to the Mediterranean Sea, making her ninth Suez Canal transit, entering the Red Sea, on her 6th Red Sea voyage and 4th Gulf of Aden voyage, steaming through the Gulf of Aden to the Arabian Sea (3rd voyage since her Indian Ocean deployment), on her first Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment in support of her 1st Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq, shooting down any Iraqi warplanes violating that airspace while preventing the Iraqis from attacking Shiite Moslem ethnic groups in the marshes of southern Iraq, operating under operational control of the US Naval Forces Central Command, operational control of the Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment, Red Sea, and Arabian Sea, headquartered in Manama, Bahrain in July 1995, while U.S. Naval Forces Central Command operational control extends to the Indian Ocean following the war with Iraq (Operation Desert Storm), with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component commander for Central Command, with the beginning of Operation Southern Watch commencing 26 August 1992, (when President George H. W. Bush announced that the United States and its allies had informed Iraq that in 24 hours Allied aircraft would fly surveillance missions in southern Iraq and were prepared to shoot down any Iraqi aircraft flying south of the 32nd parallel, while President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated at 9 p.m. EST 27 February 1992, flight operations ending at midnight), with Operation Desert Storm commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991 until 27 February 1992, when President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated and Operation Desert Storm would end at midnight) and Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait). On 27 August, aircraft from Saratoga and USS Independence (CV 62), both in the Arabian Gulf, began enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq under Operation Southern Watch. Any Iraqi warplanes violating that airspace would be shot down. This was to prevent the Iraqis from attacking Shiite Muslim ethnic groups in the marshes of southern Iraq. In the fall of 1992, the United States, Turkey, and several other NATO members participated in "Exercise Display Determination 1992," a combined forces naval exercise under the overall command of Admiral Jeremy Michael Boorda of the United States Navy, when on 1 October 1992 the Combat Direction Center Officer aboard Saratoga decided to launch a simulated attack on nearby opposition forces utilizing the Sea Sparrow missile system and after securing the approval of Saratoga Commanding Officer and the Battle Group Commander, the Combat Direction Center Officer implemented the simulated assault plan. The Battle Group Commander woke up the enlisted Sea Sparrow missile team without providing prior notice and directed them to conduct the simulated attack (certain members of the missile firing team were not told that the exercise was a drill, rather than an actual event), which resulted in tragedy when due to the absence of standard terminology between the missile system operator and officers supervising the drill, fired two live Sea Sparrow missiles at Muavenet, hitting the bridge, destroying it and the Combat Information Center, killing most of the Turkish ship's officers. From the Gulf, Saratoga returned to the Mediterranean Sea steaming through the Arabian Sea (4th voyage), Gulf of Aden en route to the Suez Canal via the Red Sea, on her 7th Red Sea voyage and 5th Gulf of Aden voyage, making her tenth Suez Canal transit, entering the Mediterranean Sea (27th Med voyage) and was there relieved on 7 October by USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) and then steamed through the North Atlantic, operating with the United States Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, steaming South on her way home (6 May to 6 November 1992)” (Ref. 1-Saratoga & 72).

Europe

Middle East

Iraq no Fly Zone

Persian Gulf

 

“USS Saratoga (CV-60) with CVW-17 embarked departed Mayport, Florida 6 May 1992, on her 21st Mediterranean Sea (26th & 27th Med voyage) and first Adriatic Sea deployment, an arm of the Med operating with the 6th Fleet, where she provided close-air support for humanitarian relief flights flying into the war-torn former Yugoslavia, flying thousands of support missions with out dropping a single piece of ordnance, proving that U.S. military presence is a powerful deterrent, steaming through the North Atlantic, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, en route to the Mediterranean Sea, making her ninth Suez Canal transit, entering the Red Sea, on her 6th Red Sea voyage and 4th Gulf of Aden voyage, steaming through the Gulf of Aden to the Arabian Sea (3rd voyage since her Indian Ocean deployment), on her first Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment in support of her 1st Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq, shooting down any Iraqi warplanes violating that airspace while preventing the Iraqis from attacking Shiite Moslem ethnic groups in the marshes of southern Iraq, operating under operational control of the US Naval Forces Central Command, operational control of the Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment, Red Sea, and Arabian Sea, headquartered in Manama, Bahrain in July 1995, while U.S. Naval Forces Central Command operational control extends to the Indian Ocean following the war with Iraq (Operation Desert Storm), with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component commander for Central Command, with the beginning of Operation Southern Watch commencing 26 August 1992, (when President George H. W. Bush announced that the United States and its allies had informed Iraq that in 24 hours Allied aircraft would fly surveillance missions in southern Iraq and were prepared to shoot down any Iraqi aircraft flying south of the 32nd parallel, while President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated at 9 p.m. EST 27 February 1992, flight operations ending at midnight), with Operation Desert Storm commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991 until 27 February 1992, when President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated and Operation Desert Storm would end at midnight) and Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait). On 27 August, aircraft from Saratoga and USS Independence (CV 62), both in the Arabian Gulf, began enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq under Operation Southern Watch. Any Iraqi warplanes violating that airspace would be shot down. This was to prevent the Iraqis from attacking Shiite Muslim ethnic groups in the marshes of southern Iraq. In the fall of 1992, the United States, Turkey, and several other NATO members participated in "Exercise Display Determination 1992," a combined forces naval exercise under the overall command of Admiral Jeremy Michael Boorda of the United States Navy, when on 1 October 1992 the Combat Direction Center Officer aboard Saratoga decided to launch a simulated attack on nearby opposition forces utilizing the Sea Sparrow missile system and after securing the approval of Saratoga Commanding Officer and the Battle Group Commander, the Combat Direction Center Officer implemented the simulated assault plan. The Battle Group Commander woke up the enlisted Sea Sparrow missile team without providing prior notice and directed them to conduct the simulated attack (certain members of the missile firing team were not told that the exercise was a drill, rather than an actual event), which resulted in tragedy when due to the absence of standard terminology between the missile system operator and officers supervising the drill, fired two live Sea Sparrow missiles at Muavenet, hitting the bridge, destroying it and the Combat Information Center, killing most of the Turkish ship's officers. From the Gulf, Saratoga returned to the Mediterranean Sea steaming through the Arabian Sea (4th voyage), Gulf of Aden en route to the Suez Canal via the Red Sea, on her 7th Red Sea voyage and 5th Gulf of Aden voyage, making her tenth Suez Canal transit, entering the Mediterranean Sea (27th Med voyage) and was there relieved on 7 October by USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) and then steamed through the North Atlantic, operating with the United States Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, steaming South on her way home (6 May to 6 November 1992)” (Ref. 1-Saratoga & 72).

USS Saratoga (CV-60)

1st Arabian Sea/Gulf (Persian Gulf) and 3rd & 4th Arabian Sea, 6th & 7th Red Sea & 4th & 5th Gulf of Aden voyage

NoLant

21st Med

Adriatic Sea

9th Suez Canal

1st OSW

10th Suez Canal

27th Med voyage

NoLant

CVW-17

AA

6 May 1992

28 Nov 1992

Europe

Middle East

Iraq no Fly Zone

Persian Gulf

 

“USS Saratoga (CV-60) with CVW-17 embarked departed Mayport, Florida 6 May 1992, on her 21st Mediterranean Sea (26th & 27th Med voyage) and first Adriatic Sea deployment, an arm of the Med operating with the 6th Fleet, where she provided close-air support for humanitarian relief flights flying into the war-torn former Yugoslavia, flying thousands of support missions with out dropping a single piece of ordnance, proving that U.S. military presence is a powerful deterrent, steaming through the North Atlantic, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, en route to the Mediterranean Sea, making her ninth Suez Canal transit, entering the Red Sea, on her 6th Red Sea voyage and 4th Gulf of Aden voyage, steaming through the Gulf of Aden to the Arabian Sea (3rd voyage since her Indian Ocean deployment), on her first Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment in support of her 1st Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq, shooting down any Iraqi warplanes violating that airspace while preventing the Iraqis from attacking Shiite Moslem ethnic groups in the marshes of southern Iraq, operating under operational control of the US Naval Forces Central Command, operational control of the Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment, Red Sea, and Arabian Sea, headquartered in Manama, Bahrain in July 1995, while U.S. Naval Forces Central Command operational control extends to the Indian Ocean following the war with Iraq (Operation Desert Storm), with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component commander for Central Command, with the beginning of Operation Southern Watch commencing 26 August 1992, (when President George H. W. Bush announced that the United States and its allies had informed Iraq that in 24 hours Allied aircraft would fly surveillance missions in southern Iraq and were prepared to shoot down any Iraqi aircraft flying south of the 32nd parallel, while President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated at 9 p.m. EST 27 February 1992, flight operations ending at midnight), with Operation Desert Storm commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991 until 27 February 1992, when President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated and Operation Desert Storm would end at midnight) and Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait). On 27 August, aircraft from Saratoga and USS Independence (CV 62), both in the Arabian Gulf, began enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq under Operation Southern Watch. Any Iraqi warplanes violating that airspace would be shot down. This was to prevent the Iraqis from attacking Shiite Muslim ethnic groups in the marshes of southern Iraq. In the fall of 1992, the United States, Turkey, and several other NATO members participated in "Exercise Display Determination 1992," a combined forces naval exercise under the overall command of Admiral Jeremy Michael Boorda of the United States Navy, when on 1 October 1992 the Combat Direction Center Officer aboard Saratoga decided to launch a simulated attack on nearby opposition forces utilizing the Sea Sparrow missile system and after securing the approval of Saratoga Commanding Officer and the Battle Group Commander, the Combat Direction Center Officer implemented the simulated assault plan. The Battle Group Commander woke up the enlisted Sea Sparrow missile team without providing prior notice and directed them to conduct the simulated attack (certain members of the missile firing team were not told that the exercise was a drill, rather than an actual event), which resulted in tragedy when due to the absence of standard terminology between the missile system operator and officers supervising the drill, fired two live Sea Sparrow missiles at Muavenet, hitting the bridge, destroying it and the Combat Information Center, killing most of the Turkish ship's officers. From the Gulf, Saratoga returned to the Mediterranean Sea steaming through the Arabian Sea (4th voyage), Gulf of Aden en route to the Suez Canal via the Red Sea, on her 7th Red Sea voyage and 5th Gulf of Aden voyage, making her tenth Suez Canal transit, entering the Mediterranean Sea (27th Med voyage) and was there relieved on 7 October by USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) and then steamed through the North Atlantic, operating with the United States Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, steaming South on her way home (6 May to 6 November 1992)” (Ref. 1-Saratoga & 72).

 

1993

 

Operation Southern Watch

 

 “On Jan. 6, 1993, four U.N. allies, the United States, Russia, France and the United Kingdom, agreed to work together in enforcing UNSCR 688. A week later, coalition aircraft destroyed surface to air missile sites and their command and control units in Southern Iraq. In addition to this action, on Jan. 17 coalition naval forces disabled an Iraqi nuclear facility with Tomahawk cruise missiles in support of UNSCR 687, the resolution demanding the destruction of all Iraqi weapons of mass destruction. The following day, the allies launched a successful air raid against Iraqi SAM systems below the 32nd parallel. Three months later, on April 18, 1993, a coalition F-4G aircraft fired a missile into an Iraqi anti-aircraft position after being illuminated by radar from that site” (Ref. 457).

 

Operation Deny Flight

 

“On 31 March 1993, the UN Security Council passed Resolution 816 authorizing enforcement of the no-fly zone over Bosnia-Herzegovina and extending the ban to cover flights by all fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft except those authorized by UNPROFOR. In the event of further violations, it authorized UN member states to take all necessary measures to ensure compliance” (Ref. 540).

“An enforcement operation, called "Deny Flight", began on 12 April 1993. It initially involved some 50 fighter and reconnaissance aircraft (later increased to over 100) from various Alliance nations, flying from airbases in Italy and from aircraft carriers in the Adriatic” (Ref. 540).

 

“In June 1993, NATO Foreign Ministers decided to offer protective air power for the United Nations Protection Force (UNPROFOR) in the performance of its overall mandate” (Ref. 540).

 

Operation Southern Watch

 

“In April 1992, the Iraqi government sponsored an assassination attempt on President Bush during his visit to Kuwait. This plot prompted a unilateral U.S. Tomahawk missile strike June 26, 1993” (Ref. 457).

 

Operation Deny Flight

 

“In July 1993, NATO aircraft began flying training missions for providing such Close Air Support (CAS)” (Ref. 540).

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

AIR WING

T.C.

DEPART

RETURN

Days at  Sea

USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) -\2nd, 6th & Central Command

(3rd Red Sea)

NoLant

3rd Med

1st ODF

1st ODF

1st Adriatic

3rd Suez Canal

2nd Red Sea

1st OSW

4th Suez Canal

Med

NoLant

CVW-8

AJ

11 Mar 1993

8 Sep 1993

Europe

Middle East

Iraq no Fly Zone

4th FWFD

182-days

1st Operation Deny Flight in the U.S. no-fly zone over Bosnia and her 1st Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq.

 

Ports of call include: Rhodes, Greece; Naples, Italy and Corfu, Greece.

 

Squadrons: VF-84 (*1) (F-14A); VFA-15 (F/A-18C); VMFA-312 (F/A-18C); VFA-87 (F/A-18C); VA-36 (*2) (A-6E); VAW-124 (E-2C); VAQ-141 (EA-6B); HS-3 (HH/SH-60H/F) and HMH-362 (CH-53D and UH-1N).

 

(*1) VF-84 disestablished on Oct. 1, 1995
(*2) VA-36 disestablished on Apr. 1, 1994

USS Hue City (CG-66); USS Richmond K. Turner (CG-20) and USS Arleigh Burke (DDG-51) joined USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) as part of her task force.

USS Constellation (CV-64) - 2nd, 3rd & Pacific Fleet

WestLant SoLant

Cape Horn

SocPac

EastPac

CVW-2

NE

27 May 1993

22 Jul 1993

Transfer to the West Coast

23rd FWFD

87-days

USS Constellation (CV-64) departed Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Pa. 27 May 1993, conducting her post-SLEP shakedown with a number of CVW-17 squadrons embarked (March 4 to April 8, 1993), returning to Norfolk, Va., then sailed for Mayport, Fla. 29 May 1993, where she embarked CVW-2, on her East to West coast transfer, steaming through the Southern Atlantic, operating with the United States Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, around Cape Horn, conducting exercises with various South American air forces, while en route to San Diego, Calif. Through the Eastern Pacific; completing of a three-year Service Life Extension Program (SLEP) at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Pa. (July 1990 to 3 March 1993), the fifth and last carrier to complete SLEP, which was a cross between new construction and a comprehensive overhaul ($800-million), designed to add 15 years to the carrier’s operational life, with upgrades to virtually every system on the ship (27 May to 22 July 1993)” (Ref. 1-Constellation & 72).

Squadrons: VF-151, FA-18C (N); VF-137, FA-18C (N); VA-145, A-6E; VAW-113, E-2C; VRC-30 Det., EA-6B; HS-14, SH-3H; VS-37, S-3B; VRC-30 Det., C-2A and HC-11 Det., CH-46D.

USS America (CVA-66) -

2nd, 6th, Central Command & 7th

(13th & 14th Red Sea, Gulf of Aden & Arabian Sea voy.)

NorLant

16th Med

ODF

PP & SG

3rd Adriatic Sea

13th Suez Canal

3rd Red Sea

1st OSW

5th Indian Ocean

OCH

UNISOM-II in Somalia

14th Suez Canal

Med

NorLant

CVW-1

AB

11 Aug 1993

5 Feb 1994

Europe

Bosnia-Herzegovina,

Middle East

Iraq War no Fly Zone

African nation of Somalia

28th FWFD

179-days

Operation Deny Flight, Provide Promise and Sharp Guard, supporting United Nations peacekeeping efforts over Bosnia, Operation Continue Hope, UNISOM-II in Somalia, supporting the U.N humanitarian efforts in Somalia was the Naval Battle Force Somalia, commanded by Rear Adm. Arthur Cebrowski, Commander, Carrier Group Six embarked in America and 1st Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq.

 

Ports visited not reported.

 

Squadrons: VF-102, F-14A; VF-33 (*1), F-14A; VFA-82, FA-18C; VFA-86, FA-18C; VA-85 (*2), A-6E / KA-6D; VAW-123, E-2C; HS-11, SH-3H; VAQ-137 (*3), EA-6B; VS-32, S-3B; VRC-40 Det. 3, C-2A and HMM-162 Det. A, CH-46E.

 

(*1) disestablished on Sep.30, 1994.

(*2) disestablished on Sep.30, 1994.

(*3 disestablished on May 26, 1994.

 

USS Normandy (CG-60) and USS Simpson (FFG-56) were part of USS America (CV-66) Joint Task Group” (Ref. 84A).

VS-32 http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/vs-32.htm

 

The new US Navy air wing concept

http://www.topedge.com/alley/squadron/lant/vf102his.htm

http://www.anft.net/f-14/f14-squadron-vf102.htm

 

 

 

Panama Canal, Cape Horn, Cape of Good Hope and Suez Canal Transits and East Coast/West Coast Transfers

Part IV of VIII – 1990 to 1993

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIER SHIP

HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619