U. S. COMMISSIONED AIRCRAFT CARRIERS PHOTOS (CV-1 to CVN-78)

Part III to IV - CVB/CVA/CV-41 to CVN-69

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIER SHIP

HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U. S. COMMISSIONED AIRCRAFT CARRIERS PHOTOS (CV-1 to CVN-78)

 

Commissioned U.S. Aircraft Carriers Photos (1920 to Present)

CV-1 to CV/CVA/CV-19

CV-20 to CV-40

CVB/CVA/CV-41 to CVN-69

CVN-70 to CVN-78

 

 

 

USS Midway (CV-41)

 

 

http://www.bluejacket.com/usn/images/sp/cv/cv41_midway.jpg

 

“The Midway (CV-41), former CVA-41 & CVB-41 (40th CC), the 35th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 35th, commissioning on 10 September 1945, with Capt. Joseph F. Bolger in command, who had earned his wings in 1920, was awarded two Navy Crosses in World War II and commanded USS Intrepid (CV-11) in combat, the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II and sponsored by, Mrs. Bradford William Ripley, Jr.; launched on 20 March 1945 at the Newport News Shipbuilding Co., Newport News, Virginia; the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II and sponsored by, Mrs. Bradford William Ripley, Jr.; keel was laid down on 27 October 1943 by Newport News Shipbuilding Co., Newport News, Virginia; the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

USS Roosevelt (CV-42)

 

 

http://www.bluejacket.com/usn/images/sp/cv/cv42_roosevelt.jpg

 

USS Roosevelt (CVA-42)

 

 

http://www.bluejacket.com/usn/images/sp/cv/cva42_fd-roosevelt_a.jpg

 

USS Roosevelt (CVA-42)
Loading F8F Bearcats

 

 

http://www.bluejacket.com/usn/images/sp/cv/cva42_fd-roosevelt_f8f.jpg

 

“The Franklin D. Roosevelt (CV-42), former CVA-42, CVB-42 & Coral Sea (CVB-42) (41st CC), the 42nd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 36th, commissioning on 27 October 1945, with Captain A. Soucek in command; renamed on 8 May 1945; named after Franklin D. Roosevelt; launched on 29 April 1945 by New York Naval Shipyard as Coral Sea (CVB-42); sponsored by Mrs. John H. Towers, wife of the Deputy Commander in Chief, Pacific Fleet, named after Franklin D. Roosevelt; keel was laid down at the New York Naval Shipyard as Coral Sea (CVB-42) on 1 December 1943” (Ref. Roosevelt & 72).

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43)

 

 

http://www.bluejacket.com/usn/images/sp/cv/cv43_coralsea.jpg

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43)

 

 

http://www.bluejacket.com/usn/images/sp/cv/cv43_coral-sea_a.jpg

 

“The Coral Sea (CV-43), former CVA-43, CVB-43 & CV-42, the 43rd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 45th, commissioning on 1 October 1947, with her 1st CO Captain A. P. Storrs, III, in command, and reported to the Atlantic Fleet, Norfolk, Va., which was designated as her home port. The ship’s patch insignia in color, signal flag and radio call sign was issued by the U.S. Navy—BIG C, CORAL MARU, AGELESS WARRIOR—which was launched on 2 April 1946 by Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company of Newport News, Va.; it was sponsored and christened by Mrs. Thomas C. Kincaid, wife of RADM Thomas Kincaid, who had commanded a cruiser division under RADM Frank Jack Fletcher at Coral Sea, a Coral Sea hero.  While under construction, the unnamed (CV-42) was first named the Coral Sea, on 10 October 1944; keel was laid down 10 July 1944 at the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company of Newport News, Va.. It was originally classified as an aircraft carrier with hull classification symbol CV-42, then reclassified as a “Large Aircraft Carrier” (CVB-43) on 15 July 1943, while the contract to build her was awarded 14 June 1943” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea & 72).

 

Unnamed (CV-44)
Never started

 

USS Valley Forge (CVS-45) c1956

 

 

http://www.bluejacket.com/usn/images/sp/cv/cvs45_valleyforge_1956.jpg

 

“The Valley Forge (LPH-8), former CVS-45, CVA-45 & CV-45 (43rd CC), the 45th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 43rd, commissioning on 3 November 1946, with Captain John W. Harris in command; launched on 18 November 1945, sponsored by Mrs. A. A. Vandegrift, wife of the Commandant of the Marine Corps; keel was laid down on 7 September 1944 by the Philadelphia Navy Yard, built with money raised by the citizens of Philadelphia in a special war bond drive” (Ref. 1-Valley Forge & 72).

 

Iwo Jima (CV-46)
Never Completed, Scrapped

 

USS Philippine Sea (CV-47)

 

 

http://www.bluejacket.com/usn/images/sp/cv/cv47_philippinesea.jpg

 

“The Philippine Sea (AVT-11), former CVS-47, CVA-47 & CV-47 (44th CC), the 47th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 41st, commissioning on 11 May 1946, with Captain D. S. Cornwell in command; launched on 5 September 1945, sponsored by Mrs. Albert B. Chandler; keel was laid down by the Bethlehem Steel Company, Quincy, Mass. on 19 August 1944” (Ref. 1-Philippine Sea & 72).

 

USS Saipan (CVL-48)

 

 

http://www.bluejacket.com/usn/images/sp/cv/cvl48_saipan.jpg

 

“The Arlington (AGMR-2), former Saipan, AGMR-2, CC-3, AVT-6 & CVL-48 (42nd CC), the 48th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy an light aircraft carrier and lead ship of her class of carrier, and in order of commission, the 42nd, commissioning on 14 July 1946, with Captain John G. Crommelin in command; name changed to Arlington on 8 April 1965 and served as an communications relay ship until decommissioned) launched on 8 July 1945, sponsored by Mrs. John W. McCormack; keel was laid down on 10 July 1944 by the New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey” (Ref. 1-Saipan & 72).

 

USS Wright (CVL-49)

 

 

http://www.bluejacket.com/usn/images/sp/cv/cvl49_wright_rep.jpg

 

“The second Wright (CC-2), former AVT-7 & CVL-49 (46th CC), the 49th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 44th, commissioning at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard on 9 February 1947, Captain Frank T. Ward in command; Converted to and commissioned 11 May 1963 as a command ship; launched on 1 September 1945, (the day before the formal Japanese surrender ceremony on board the battleship USS Missouri (BB-63) in Tokyo Bay), sponsored by Mrs. Harold S. Miller, a niece of the Wright brothers; keel was laid down on 21 August 1944 at Camden, New Jersey, by the New York Shipbuilding Corporation, as a Saipan-class light aircraft carrier and named after the Wright brothers” (Ref. 1-Wright & 72).

 

Unnamed (CV-50) to (CV-57)
Never started

 

United States (CV-58) - Never Completed, Scrapped

 

 

A Brief History of U.S. Navy Aircraft Carriers - Ref. 1088

 

USS United States (CVA-58), the third ship of the U.S. Navy named for its nation, was to be the lead ship of a radical new design of aircraft carrier. On 29 July 1948 President of the United States Harry Truman approved construction of five "supercarriers", for which funds had been provided in the Naval Appropriations Act of 1949. The keel of the first of those five postwar carriers was laid down on 18 April 1949 at Newport News Shipbuilding. The flush-deck United States was designed to launch and recover the 100,000 pound (45 t) aircraft required to carry early-model nuclear weapons, which weighed as much as five tons. The ship would have no island and be equipped with four aircraft elevators and four catapults. The construction cost of the new ship alone was estimated at US$190 million. The additional thirty-nine ships required to complete the accompanying task force raised the total cost to US$1.265 billion. United States was also designed to provide air support for amphibious forces and to conduct sea control operations, but its primary mission was long-range nuclear bombardment. That mission put the ship in harm's way long before construction began. The United States Air Force viewed United States as a challenge to their monopoly on strategic nuclear weapons delivery.

 

Swayed by limited funds and bitter opposition from the United States Army and Air Force, Secretary of Defense Louis A. Johnson announced on 23 April 1949 — five days after the ship's keel was laid down — the cancellation of construction of United States. Secretary of the Navy John Sullivan immediately resigned, and the subsequent "Revolt of the Admirals" cost Admiral Louis Denfeld his position as Chief of Naval Operations, but atomic bombs went to sea on the aircraft carrier USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVB-42), former Coral Sea (CVB-42) in 1950. United States was also designed to provide air support for amphibious forces and to conduct sea control operations, but its primary mission was long-range nuclear bombardment. That mission put the ship in harm's way long before construction began. The United States Air Force viewed United States as a challenge to their monopoly on strategic nuclear weapons delivery. Swayed by limited funds and bitter opposition from the United States Army and Air Force, Secretary of Defense Louis A. Johnson announced on 23 April 1949 — five days after the ship's keel was laid down — the cancellation of construction of United States. Secretary of the Navy John Sullivan immediately resigned, and the subsequent "Revolt of the Admirals" cost Admiral Louis Denfeld his position as Chief of Naval Operations, but atomic bombs went to sea on the aircraft carrier USS Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1950.

 

 

USS Forrestal (CV-59)

 

 

http://www.bluejacket.com/usn/images/sp/cv/cv59_forrestal.gif

 

“The first of the "supercarriers," Forrestal (AVT-59), former CV-59 & CVA-59 (47th CC), the 59th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 47th, commissioning on 1 October 1955, Captain R. L. Johnson in command; launched on 11 December 1954 by Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Co., Newport News, Virginia, sponsored by Mrs. James V Forrestal, widow of Secretary of the Navy James Forrestal. Forrestal represented more than one step in the evolutionary chain of modern carrier aviation. Besides her sheer size and weight, she was the first built with an angled flight deck, which allows simultaneous takeoffs and landings. She also featured four catapults and four deck edge elevators to move aircraft from the hangar bay to the flight deck; keel was laid down at Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Co., Newport News, Virginia on 14 July 1952. USS Forrestal (CVA-59) represented more than one step in the evolutionary chain of modern carrier aviation. Besides her sheer size and weight, she was the first built with an angled flight deck, which allows simultaneous takeoffs and landings” (Ref. 1-Forrestal & 72).

 

USS Saratoga (CV-60)

 

 

http://www.bluejacket.com/usn/images/sp/cv/cv60_saratoga2.jpg

 

USS Saratoga (CV-60)

 

 

http://www.bluejacket.com/usn/images/sp/cv/cv60_saratoga.jpg

 

USS Saratoga (CVA-60)

 

 

http://www.bluejacket.com/usn/images/sp/cv/cva60_saratoga.jpg

 

“The Saratoga (CV-60), former CVA-60 & CVB-60 (48th CC), the 60th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 48th, commissioning on 14 April 1956 with Captain R.J. Stroh in command; launched on 8 October 1955, sponsored by Mrs. Charles S. Thomas; keel was laid down on 16 December 1952; reclassified as an "Attack Aircraft Carrier" (CVA-60) on 1 October 1952; ordered as a Forrestal-class aircraft carrier and was named for the American Revolutionary War Battle of Saratoga with the contract for construction being awarded to New York Naval Shipyard of New York City on 23 July 1952” (Ref. 1-Saratoga & 72).

 

USS Ranger (CVA-61)

 

 

http://www.bluejacket.com/usn/images/sp/cv/cva61_ranger_bow.jpg

 

USS Ranger (CVA-61)

 

 

http://www.bluejacket.com/usn/images/sp/cv/cv61_ranger.jpg

 

USS Ranger (CVA-61)
Car City

 

 

http://www.bluejacket.com/usn/images/sp/cv/cv61_ranger_cars.jpg

 

“The seventh Ranger (CV-61), former CVA-61 (49th CC), the 61st aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 49th, commissioning at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard 10 August 1957, with Captain Charles T. Booth II in command; launched on 29 September 1956, sponsored by Mrs. Arthur Radford (wife of Admiral Radford, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff); keel was laid down on 2 August 1954 by Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., Newport News, Virginia, and was a United States Navy Forrestal-class aircraft carrier” (Ref. 1-Ranger & 72).

 

USS Independence (CV-62)

 

 

http://www.bluejacket.com/usn/images/sp/cv/cv62_independence.jpg

 

“The fifth Independence (CV-62) (50th CC), the 62nd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 50th, commissioning at the Brooklyn Naval Shipyard, New York, on 10 January 1959, with Captain R. Y. McElroy in command. One of the newest class of "supercarriers” at the time of her commissioning; launched on by New York Navy Yard on 6 June 1958; sponsored by Mrs. Thomas Gates, wife of the Secretary of the Navy; keel was laid down in July 1955 at the New York Navy Yard as a Forrestal Class Attack Aircraft Carrier” (Ref. 1-Independence, 72, 84A & 325).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CVA-63)

 

 

http://www.bluejacket.com/usn/images/sp/cv/cva63_kittyhawk.jpg

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63)

 

 

http://www.bluejacket.com/usn/images/sp/cv/cv63_kittyhawk.jpg

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63)
ROKN Submarine

 

 

http://www.bluejacket.com/usn/images/sp/cv/cv63_kittyhawk_rkn_sub.jpg

 

“The second Kitty Hawk (CV-63) (51st CC), the 63rd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 51st, commissioning on 29 April 1961 at Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, with Captain William F. Bringle in command and was the first of the Kitty Hawk class (the only other two being the USS Constellation (CVA-64) and USS America (CVA-66). ADM Arleigh A. Burke, Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), delivered the principal address, hailing Kitty Hawk as the “forerunner of a new and greatly improved line of carriers.”; launched on 21 May 1960, sponsored by Mrs. Camilla F. McElroy, wife of Secretary of Defense Neil H. McElroy (9 Oct 1957–1 Dec 1959); keel was laid down by the New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey, 27 December 1956 and is the second U.S. Navy ship named after the small North Carolina town near which Orville and Wilbur Wright flew the first-ever successful, controlled, powered aircraft on 17 December 1903. Kitty Hawk changed homeports from San Diego, Calif. to Hunter's Point San Francisco, Calif. January 1973. Completed "CV" designation modification and alterations at Hunter's Point San Francisco, Calif., in July 1973 and returned to her homeport of from San Diego, Calif.; moved out of dry dock on 28 April 1973, and the next day, on her 12th birthday, was reclassified a Multi-Purpose Aircraft Carrier (CV)” (Ref. 1-Kitty Hawk, 72, 331A & 331B-1961).

 

USS Constellation (CV-64)

 

 

http://www.bluejacket.com/usn/images/sp/cv/cv64_constellation.jpg

 

USS Constellation (CV-64)
circa 1977

 

 

http://www.bluejacket.com/usn/images/sp/cv/cv64_constellation_1977.jpg

 

USS Constellation (CV-64)

 

 

“The Constellation (CV-64) (52nd CC), the 64th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 52nd, commissioning on 27 October 1961, with Captain T.J. Walker in command, having been delivered to the Navy 1 October 1961; launched on 8 October 1960, sponsored by Mary Herter (wife of Secretary of State Christian Herter); keel was laid down on 14 September 1957, at the New York Navy Yard, Brooklyn, New York, as a Kitty Hawk-class aircraft carrier, while the contract to build her was awarded on 1 July 1956, she was the third ship of the United States Navy to be named in honor of the "new constellation of stars" on the flag of the United States, which was named for one of the six frigates bought by the Continental Congress in the late 1790s. The first of those frigates made American naval history and was named for the ring of 13 stars that formed a "new Constellation" on the flag of the new United States” (Ref. 1-Constellation & 72).

http://www.bluejacket.com/usn/images/sp/cv/cv64_constellation_sundwn.jpg

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65)

 

The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) transit the Philippine Sea while conducting a Vertical Replenishment (VERTREP) with the Military Sealift Command (MSC) combat stores ship USNS San Jose (T-AFS 7).

 

060724-N-0119G-018 Philippine Sea (July 24, 2006) - The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65) transit the Philippine Sea while conducting a Vertical Replenishment (VERTREP) with the Military Sealift Command (MSC) combat stores ship USNS San Jose (T-AFS 7). Enterprise and embarked Carrier Air Wing One (CVW-1) are currently underway on a scheduled six-month deployment in support of the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Rob Gaston (RELEASED) http://www.news.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=37325

 

“The eighth Enterprise (CVN-65) (53rd CC), the 65th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 53rd, commissioning on 25 November 1961 with Captain V. P. de Poix in command; launched on 24 September 1960 by Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Co., Newport News, Virginia, sponsored by Mrs. W. B. Franke, wife of the Secretary of the Navy; the world's first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, powered by eight A2W reactors, four shafts with the flight deck width at 76 m (252 ft), beam of 40 m (133 ft) and displacement of 89,600 tons fully loaded; keel was laid (336 m (1,101 ft)) in 1958 at Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia” (Ref. 1-Enterprise & 72).

 

USS America (CV-66)

 

 

“The third America (CV-66), former CVA-66 (54th CC), the 66th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 54th  commissioning at the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp. Portsmouth, Virginia, on 23 January 1965, Captain Lawrence Heyworth, Jr., in command; launched on 1 February 1964, sponsored by Mrs. David L. McDonald, wife of Admiral David L. McDonald, the Chief of Naval Operations; keel was laid down on 1 January 1961 by the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., as one of three  supercarriers of the United States Navy, proceeded by USS Constellation (CVA-63) and USS Kitty Hawk (CVA-63)” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

http://www.bluejacket.com/usn/images/sp/cv/cva66_america_.jpg

 

USS John F. Kennedy (CVA-67)

 

 

“The John F. Kennedy (CV-67), former CVA-67 (55th CC), the 67th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 55th, commissioning on 7 September 1968; launched on 27 May 1967; keel was laid down on 22 October 1964 by the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia, as a modification of the earlier Kitty Hawk class aircraft carriers, and they are sometimes considered a single class” (Ref. 72, 76 & 84A).

http://www.bluejacket.com/usn/images/sp/cv/cva67_jf-kennedy2.jpg

 

USS Nimitz (CVN 68)

 

 

Good overhead image, showing the overall details of the Nimitz-class. Picture taken sometime in 1975-1977, with Carrier Air Wing Eight (CVW-8) aboard. NS026803 125k. USN. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026803.jpg

 

“The Nimitz (CVN-68), former CVA(N)-68  (56th CC), the 68th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 56th, commissioning on 3 May 1975 at Norfolk, Va. “Only America can make a machine like this,” noted President Gerald R. Ford at Nimitz’s Commissioning. “There is nothing like her in the world.” RADM Richard E. Rumble, Commander, Fifth Naval District, put Nimitz into commission at Pier 12, NS Norfolk, Va. Secretary  of  Defense James R. Schlesinger, Secretary of the Navy J. William Middendorf, Chief of Naval Operations ADM James L. Holloway, III, and ADM Rickover were among the more than 20,000 guests. Captain Bryan W. Compton, Jr., the ship’s first CO, took command of the Nimitz Precommissioning Unit 12 July 1972; Hull No. 594 launched from Shipway 11, Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co. on 13 May 1972, sponsored by Mrs. James T. Nimitz-Lay. Based upon a design originally submitted to build the Midway class of aircraft carriers during WWII, the company raised the 1,100 foot long submerged shipway from tidal flats and extended it to accommodate Nimitz class aircraft carriers. Her keel was laid down 22 June 1968 by Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia. Senator Henry M. Jackson (D., Wash.) authenticated that company’s Hull No. 594. The company finished and outfitted her at Pier 2. Nimitz was a supercarrier, the lead ship of its class; named for Admiral Chester Nimitz, who commanded the Pacific fleet in World War II. The Navy awarded Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., a $106.3 million award toward the design and construction of Nimitz (CVA(N)-68) on 15 May 1968. It is one of the largest warships in the world. Principal guests at commissioning included: the Honorable James R. Schlesinger, Secretary of Defense; the Honorable J. William Middendorf, II, Secretary of the Navy; Admiral James L. Holloway, III, Chief of Naval Operations and Mrs. James T. Nimitz-Lay, Ship's Sponsor. Speaking to a crowd of over 20,000, the President said in his remarks: "Wherever the United States Ship Nimitz shows her flag, she will be seen as we see her now - a solid symbol of United States strength; United States resolve. Made in America and manned by Americans. Whether her mission is one of defense, diplomacy or humanity, Nimitz will command awe and admiration from some, caution and circumspection from others and respect from all” (Ref. 72, 371 & 372A).

 

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69)

 

 

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) alongside the nuclear-powered guided-missile cruiser USS California (CGN-36) whilst on a training exercise in the Caribbean in 1978. NS026942. Submitted by: Robert Hurst.  http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026942.jpg

 

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69)

http://www.military.cz/usa/navy/uss/carriers/ike/ike.jpg

http://search.live.com/images/results.aspx?q=uss+dwight+d+eisenhower&mkt=en-us#

 

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69)

 

 

Norfolk, Va., June 10, 1998 — The aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) gets a little shove out to sea as she departs for a scheduled six-month deployment to the Mediterranean. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Ronald Strickland (# 980610-N-2114S-037). http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026907.jpg

 

“The Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69), former CVA(N)-69 (57th CC), the 69th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 57th, commissioning on 18 October 1977 (“Break the commissioning pennant,” ordered CDR Clexton at 1111, exactly two years and seven days to the minute since her christening), with Captain William E. Ramsey in command. Secretary of Defense Dr. Harold Brown, ADMs Holloway and Kidd, VADM Greer, and Mamie and John Eisenhower were among the crowd of thousands gathered beneath “a cloudless blue sky; launched from the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia, and entered the water, at which point eight tugs assisted her across the James River to Pier 2 at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, Virginia, where she was christened by Mrs. Mamie Doud-Eisenhower, the ship’s sponsor and widow of the late president at 11:11 a.m. the same day. Vice President Nelson A. Rockefeller addressed the crowd of over 8,000 at one point in the ceremony, and dignitaries in attendance included Secretary of the Navy J. William Middendorf II, ADM James L. Holloway, III (Chief of Naval Operations), ADM Hyman G. Rickover (Navy Nuclear Propulsion Director), ADM Isaac C. Kidd, Jr. (Commander-in-Chief, Atlantic Fleet) former Ambassador John S. D. Eisenhower, son of the late President, Virginia Governor Mills E. Godwin, Jr., and CAPT Ramsey. The vice president warned the audience that Dwight D. Eisenhower should help them to recognize that the Republic could not fall behind East Bloc expansion to become “the second greatest sea power;” reclassified CVN-69 while still under construction 30 June 1975; keel was laid down as hull number 599 on 15 August 1970 at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia at a cost of $679 million ($4.5 billion in 2007 dollars), and is the second of 10 Nimitz-class supercarrier; nicknamed "Ike. On commissioning, Ike replaced the aged World War II-era carrier USS Franklin D. Roosevelt in the fleet." Congress authorized construction of the third nuclear-powered and second Nimitz-class aircraft carrier in fiscal year 1970 at a cost of $679 million ($4.5 billion in 2007 dollars)” (Ref. 44, 72, 76, 84A, 383 & 383B).

 

 

Commissioned U.S. Aircraft Carriers Photos (1920 to Present)

CV-1 to CV/CVA/CV-19

CV-20 to CV-40

CVB/CVA/CV-41 to CVN-69

CVN-70 to CVN-78