U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS RECORD OF

EAST/WEST COAST TRANSFERS AND TRANSITS

(Panama Canal, Cape Horn, Cape of Good Hope and Suez Canal)

 

Summary Total - September 1945 to Present

 

U. S. Aircraft Carrier Deployments and or both Panama Canal, Cape Horn, Cape of Good Hope and Suez Canal Transits and East /West Coast Transfers

Panama Canal, Cape Horn, Cape of Good Hope and Suez Canal Transits and East Coast/West Coast Transfers

 

Part I of VIII – 1928 to 1945

Part II of VIII – 1946 to 1969

Part III of VIII – 1970 to 1989

Part IV of VIII – 1990 to 1993

Part V of VIII – 1994 to 2000

Part VI of VIII – 2001 to 2005

Part VII of VIII – 2006 to 2012

Part VIII of VIII – 2013 to Present

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

AIR WING

T.C.

DEPART

RETURN

Transit / Transfer

USS Saratoga (CV-3)

Lant

Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

 

 

6 Jan 1928

21 Feb 1928

West Coast Transfer

“USS Saratoga (CV-3) sailed from Philadelphia on 6 January 1928 for shakedown, and, on 11 January, her air officer, the future World War II hero, Marc A. Mitscher, landed the first aircraft on board in a UO-1. In an experiment on 27 January, the rigid airship Los Angeles (ZR-3) moored to Saratoga's stern and took on fuel and stores. The same day Saratoga sailed for the Eastern Pacific through the Caribbean Sea via the Panama Canal. She was diverted briefly between 14 and 16 February to carry Marines to Corinto, Nicaragua, and finally joined the Battle Fleet at San Pedro, Calif., on 21 February. The rest of the year was spent in training and final machinery shakedown” (Ref. 1-Saratoga & 72).

USS Lexington (CV-2)

Lant

Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

 

 

Mar 1928

7 Apr  1928

West Coast Transfer

“After fitting out and shakedown, USS Lexington (CV-2) joined the battle fleet at San Pedro, Calif., 7 April 1928, sailing for the Eastern Pacific through the Caribbean Sea via the Panama Canal. Based there, she operated on the west coast with Aircraft Squadrons, Battle Fleet, in flight training, tactical exercises, and battle problems. Each year she participated in fleet maneuvers in the Hawaiians, in the Caribbean, off the Panama Canal Zone, and in the eastern Pacific. On 16 January 1930, Lexington completed a 30-day period in which she furnished electricity to the city of Tacoma, Wash., in an emergency arising from a failure of the city's power supply. The electricity from the carrier totaled more than 4.25 million kilowatt-hours” (Ref. 1-Lexington & 72).

USS Saratoga (CV-3)

Lant

Caribbean

Panama Canal x 2

EastPac

 

 

15 Jan 1929

May 1929

East & West Coast War Game

“On 15 January 1929, USS Saratoga (CV-3) sailed from San Diego with the Battle Fleet to participate in her first fleet exercise, Fleet Problem IX. In a daring move, Saratoga was detached from the fleet with only a single cruiser as escort to make a wide sweep to the south and "attack" the Panama Canal, which was defended by the Scouting Fleet and Saratoga's sister ship, USS Lexington (CV 2). She successfully launched her strike [340] on 26 January, and despite being "sunk" three times later in the day, proved the versatility of a fast task force centered around a carrier. The idea was incorporated into fleet doctrine and reused the following year in Fleet Problem X in the Caribbean Sea, which found Saratoga sailing from the Eastern Pacific to the Panama Canal. This time, however, Saratoga and carrier, USS Langley (CV 1), were "disabled" by a surprise attack from Lexington, showing how quickly air power could swing the balance in a naval action. Following the fleet concentration in the Caribbean, Saratoga took part in the Presidential Review at Norfolk in May and returned to San Pedro on 21 June 1930, sailing for the Eastern Pacific through the Caribbean Sea via the Panama Canal. During the remaining decade before World War II Saratoga exercised in the San Diego-San Pedro area, except for the annual fleet problems and regular overhauls at the Bremerton Navy Yard” (Ref. 1-Saratoga & 72).

USS Lexington (CV-2) and USS Saratoga (CV-3)

Lant

Caribbean

Panama Canal

EastPac

 

 

1929

1941

East & West Coast Exercises

“Operating out of San Pedro, Calif., from 7 April 1928 to the fall of 1941, when she sailed with the battle force to the Hawaiians for tactical exercises, USS Lexington (CV-2) operated on the west coast with Aircraft Squadrons, Battle Fleet, in flight training, tactical exercises, and battle problems. Each year she participated in fleet maneuvers in the Hawaiians, in the Caribbean, off the Panama Canal Zone, and in the eastern Pacific, with an un disclosed number of Panama Canal transits, as in the case of USS Saratoga (CV-3) operating out of San Pedro beginning 6 January 1928. During the remaining decade before World War II Saratoga exercised in the San Diego-San Pedro area, except for the annual fleet problems and regular overhauls at the Bremerton Navy Yard. In the fleet problems, Saratoga continued to assist in the development of fast carrier tactics, and her importance was recognized by the fact that she was always a high priority target for the opposing forces. The fleet problem for 1932 was planned for Hawaii, and, by coincidence occurred during the peak of the furor following the "Manchurian incident" in which Japan started on the road to World War II. Saratoga exercised in the Hawaii area from 31 January to 19 March and returned to Hawaii for fleet exercises the following year between 23 January and 28 February 1933. On the return trip to the west coast, she launched a successful air "attack" on the Long Beach area. until the last reported Exercises in 1934 that took Saratoga to the Caribbean and the Atlantic for an extended period, from 9 April to 9 November, and were followed by equally extensive operations with the United States Fleet in the Pacific the following year. Between 27 April and 6 June 1936, she participated in a fleet problem in the Canal Zone, and she then returned with the fleet to Hawaii for exercises from 16 April to 28 May 1937” (Ref. 1- Lexington, Saratoga & 72).

USS Ranger (CV-4)

Lant

Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

 

 

7 Apr 1935

15 Apr 1935

West Coast Transfer

“USS Ranger (CV-4) conducted her first air operations off Cape Henry 6 August 1934 and departed Norfolk the 17th for a shakedown training cruise that took her to Rio de Janeiro, Buenos Aires, and Montevideo. She returned to Norfolk 4 October for operations off the Virginia Capes until 28 March 1935, when she sailed for the Eastern Pacific through the Caribbean Sea via the Panama Canal on 7 April, she arrived San Diego on the 15th” (Ref. 1- Ranger).

USS Ranger (CV-4)

EastPac

2nd Panama Canal

Caribbean

Lant

 

 

4 Jan 1939

18 Apr 1939

East Coast Transfer

“USS Ranger (CV-4) participated in fleet problems reaching to Hawaii, and in western seaboard operations that took her as far south as Callao, Peru, and as far north as Seattle, Wash. from 1935 to 1939. On 4 January 1939, she departed San Diego for winter fleet operations in the Caribbean, out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. She then steamed north to Norfolk, Va., sailing forom the Eastern Pacific via the Panama Canal, arriving 18 April. Ranger cruised along the eastern seaboard out of Norfolk and into the Caribbean Sea” (Ref. 1- Ranger).

USS Enterprise (CV-6)

Lant

Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

 

 

Apr 1939

Apr 1939

West Coast Transfer

“USS Enterprise (CV-6) sailed south on a shakedown cruise which took her to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. After her return she operated along the east coast and in the Caribbean until April of 1939 when she was ordered to duty in the Pacific, sailing for the Eastern Pacific through the Caribbean Sea via the Panama Canal. Based first out of San Diego and then in Pearl Harbor, the carrier trained herself and her aircraft squadrons for any eventuality, and carried aircraft among the island bases of the Pacific” (Ref. 1-Enterprise & 72).

USS Yorktown (CV-5)

Lant

Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

 

 

20 Apr 1939

May 1939

West Coast Transfer

“Following Fleet Problem XX, USS Yorktown (CV-5) returned briefly to Hampton Roads before sailing for the Pacific on 20 April 1939. Transiting the Panama Canal a week later, Yorktown soon commenced a regular routine of operations with the Pacific Fleet. Operating out of San Diego into 1940, the carrier participated in Fleet Problem XXI that April. Fleet Problem XXI — a two-part exercise — included some of the operations that would characterize future warfare in the Pacific. The first part of the exercise was devoted to training in making plans and estimates; in screening and scouting; in coordination of combatant units; and in employing fleet and standard dispositions. The second phase included training in convoy protection, the seizure of advanced bases, and, ultimately, the decisive engagement between the opposing fleets. The last pre-war exercise of its type, Fleet Problem XXI, contained two exercises (comparatively minor at the time) where air operations played a major role. Fleet Joint Air Exercise 114A prophetically pointed out the need to coordinate Army and Navy defense plans for the Hawaiian Islands, and Fleet Exercise 114 proved that aircraft could be used for high altitude tracking of surface forces — a significant role for planes that would be fully realized in the war to come. With the retention of the Fleet in Hawaiian waters after the conclusion of Fleet Problem XXI, Yorktown operated in the Pacific off the west coast of the United States and in Hawaiian waters until the following spring, when the success of German U-boats preying upon British shipping in the Atlantic required a shift of American naval strength. Thus, to reinforce the Atlantic Fleet, the Navy transferred a substantial force from the Pacific including Yorktown, a battleship division, and accompanying cruisers and destroyers” (Ref. 1-Yorktown & 72).

USS Yorktown (CV-5)

Lant

Caribbean

2nd Panama Canal

EastPac

WestPac

 

 

20 Apr 1941

12 Apr 1941

West Coast Transfer

“With the retention of the Fleet in Hawaiian waters after the conclusion of Fleet Problem XXI, Yorktown operated in the Pacific off the west coast of the United States and in Hawaiian waters until the following spring, when the success of German U-boats preying upon British shipping in the Atlantic required a shift of American naval strength. Thus, to reinforce the Atlantic Fleet, the Navy transferred a substantial force from the Pacific including Yorktown, a battleship division, and accompanying cruisers and destroyers. USS Yorktown (CV-5) departed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 20 April 1941 in company with USS Warrington (DD-383), USS Somers (DD-381), and USS Jouett (DD-396); headed southeast, steaming through the Western Pacific and Eastern Pacific, operating with the Pacific and Seventh Fleets, transiting  the Panama Canal on the night of 6 and 7 May, arriving at Bermuda on the 12th. From that time to the entry of the United States into the war, Yorktown conducted four patrols in the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, ranging from Newfoundland to Bermuda and logging 17,642 miles steamed while enforcing American neutrality. Although Adolph Hitler had forbidden his submarines to attack American ships, the men who manned the American naval vessels were not aware of this policy and operated on a wartime footing in the Atlantic. On 28 October, while Yorktown, the battleship USS New Mexico (BB 40), and other American warships were screening a convoy, a destroyer picked up a submarine contact and dropped depth charges while the convoy itself made an emergency starboard turn, the first of the convoy's three emergency changes of course. Late that afternoon, engine repairs to one of the ships in the convoy, Empire Pintail, reduced the convoy's speed to 11 knots. During the night, the American ships intercepted strong German radio signals, indicating submarines probably in the vicinity reporting the group. Rear Admiral H. Kent Hewitt, commanding the escort force sent a destroyer to sweep astern of the convoy to destroy the U-boat or at least to drive him under.  The next day, while cruiser scout-planes patrolled overhead, Yorktown and USS Savannah (CL-42) fueled their escorting destroyers, finishing the task just at dusk. On October 30, 1941, Yorktown was preparing to fuel three destroyers when other escorts made sound contacts. The convoy subsequently made 10 emergency turns while USS Morris (DD-417) and USS Anderson (DD-411) dropped depth charges, and USS Hughes (DD-410) assisted in developing the contact. Anderson later made two more depth charge attacks, noticing "considerable oil with slick spreading but no wreckage." The short-of-war period was becoming more like the real thing as each day went on. Elsewhere on 30 October and more than a month before Japanese planes attacked Pearl Harbor, U-562 torpedoed the destroyer USS Reuben James (DD-245), sinking her with a heavy loss of life-the first loss of an American warship in World War II. After another Neutrality Patrol stint in November, Yorktown put into Norfolk, Va. on 2 December and was there five days later when American fighting men in Hawaii were rudely awakened to find their country at war” (Ref. 1-Yorktown).

USS Yorktown (CV-5)

EastPac

3rd Panama Canal

Caribbean

Lant

 

 

16 Dec 1941

30 Dec 1941

West Coast Transfer WW II

“The early news from the Pacific was bleak: the Pacific Fleet had taken a beating. With the battle line crippled, the unhurt American carriers assumed great importance. There were, on 7 December, only three in the Pacific. USS Enterprise, USS Lexington (CV-2), and USS Saratoga (CV-3). While USS Ranger (CV-4), USS Wasp (CV-7), and the recently commissioned USS Hornet (CV-8) remained in the Atlantic. USS Yorktown (CV-5) departed Norfolk on 16 December 1941 and sailed for the Pacific, bound for the forward area, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting  the Panama Canal, steaming through the Eastern and Western Pacific, operating with the Pacific and Seventh Fleets, while her secondary gun galleries studded with new 20-millimeter Oerlikon machine guns. She reached San Diego, Calif., on 30 December 1941 and soon became flagship for Rear Admiral Frank Jack Fletcher's newly formed Task Force (TF) 17” (Ref. 1- Yorktown).

USS Hornet (CV-8)

Lant

Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

WestPac

 

 

4 Mar 1942

20 Mar 1942

West Coast Transfer WW II

“During the uneasy period before Pearl Harbor, USS Hornet (CV-8) trained out of Norfolk. A hint of a future mission occurred 2 February 1942 when Hornet departed with two Army B-25 Mitchell medium bombers on deck. Once at sea, the planes were launched, made possible by a technical observation of Captain Francis Low that twin-engined bombers could be launched from an aircraft carrier to the surprise and amazement of Hornet crew. Her men were unaware of the meaning of this experiment. Subsequent tests appeared to prove that a B-25 Mitchell could be launched with a reasonable bomb load, hit targets in Japan and then fly on to land in China. Hornet returned to Norfolk, Virginia, now prepared to leave for combat. Hornet sailed for the west coast bound for the forward area 4 March 1941, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting  the Panama Canal, steaming through the Eastern and Western Pacific, operating with the Pacific and Seventh Fleets” (Ref. 1-Hornet & 72).

USS Wasp (CV-7)

Lant

Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

WestPac

 

 

6 Jun 1942

19 Jun 1942

West Coast Transfer WW II

“USS Wasp (CV-7) was conducting two important missions to Malta, a train of events far to the westward beckoned the carrier to the Pacific theater. Early in May, almost simultaneously with Wasp's second Malta run — Operation Bowery — the Battle of the Coral Sea had been fought. That action turned back the Japanese thrust at Port Moresby. One month later from 4 to 6 June 1942, an American carrier force smashed its Japanese counterpart in the pivotal Battle of Midway. These two victories cost the United States two precious carriers: USS Lexington (CV-2) at Coral Sea and USS Yorktown (CV-5) at Midway. While the Japanese had suffered the damaging of two at Coral Sea and the loss of four carriers at Midway, the United States could scarcely afford to be left with only two operational carriers in the western and central Pacific — USS Enterprise (CV-6) and USS Hornet (CV-8). USS Saratoga (CV-3) was still undergoing repairs and modernization after being torpedoed off Oahu in early January 1942. To prepare to strengthen the American Navy in the Pacific, Wasp was hurried back to the United States for alterations and repairs at the Norfolk Navy Yard. During the carrier's stay in the Tidewater region, Capt. Reeves — who had been promoted to flag rank — was relieved by Capt. Forrest P. Sherman on 31 May 1942. Departing Norfolk on 6 June 1942, the last day of the critical Battle of Midway, USS Wasp (CV-7) sailed with TF 37 which was built around the carrier and the new battleship USS North Carolina (BB-55) and escorted by USS Quincy (CA-39) and USS San Juan (CL-54) and a half-dozen destroyers, bound for the forward area, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting  the Panama Canal on 10 June, at which time Wasp and her consorts became TF 18, the carrier flying the two-starred flag of Rear Admiral Leigh Noyes, steaming through the Eastern and Western Pacific, operating with the Pacific and Seventh Fleets. Arriving at San Diego on 19 June, Wasp embarked the remainder of her complement of aircraft, Grumman TBF-1s and Douglas SBD-3s-10 of the former and 12 of the latter conducting their carrier qualification on 22 and 23 June, respectively, the latter replacing the old Vindicators. On 1 July, she sailed for the Tonga Islands as part of the convoy for the five transports that had embarked the 2d Marine Regiment” (Ref. 1-Wasp).

USS Belleau Wood (CVL-24)

Lant

Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

 

 

Apr 1943

26 Jul 1943

West Coast Transfer WW II

“USS Belleau Wood (CVL-24) was commissioned 31 March 1943,with Captain A. M. Pride in command and after a brief shakedown cruise Belleau Wood reported to the Pacific Fleet, bound for the forward area, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting  the Panama Canal, steaming through the Eastern and Western Pacific, operating with the Pacific and Seventh Fleets, arriving at Pearl Harbor 26 July 1943” (Ref. 1-Belleau Wood & 72).

USS Essex (CV-9)

Lant

Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

 

 

May 1943

May 1943

West Coast Transfer WW II

“Following her shakedown cruise USS Essex (CV-9) sailed to the Pacific in May 1943, bound for the forward area, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting  the Panama Canal, steaming through the Eastern and Western Pacific, operating with the Pacific and Seventh Fleets, to begin a succession of victories which would bring her to Tokyo Bay” (Ref. 1-Enterprise).

USS Independence (CVL-22)

Lant

Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

 

 

Jun 1943

3 July 1943

West Coast Transfer WW II

“USS Independence (CVL-22) sailed for the forward area, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting  the Panama Canal, steaming through the Eastern and Western Pacific, operating with the Pacific and Seventh Fleets, arriving San Francisco 3 July 1943. Independence got underway for Pearl Harbor 14 July, and after 2 weeks of vital training exercises sailed with carriers USS Essex (CV 9)and USS Yorktown (CV 10) for a devastating raid on Marcus Island. Planes from the carrier force struck 1 September and destroyed over 70 percent of the installations on the island. The carrier began her next operation, a similar strike against Wake Island 5 to 6 October as CVL-22, redesignated 15 July 1943” (Ref. 1-Independence & 72).

USS Monterey (CVL-26)

Lant

Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

WestPac

 

 

July 1943

19 Nov 1943

West Coast Transfer WW II

USS Monterey (CV-26) was commissioned 17 June 1943, with Capt. Lestor T. Hundt in command and reclassified CVL-26 on 15 July 1943. Shortly after commissioning, and, after shakedown, Monterey departed Philadelphia for the western Pacific, bound for the forward area, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting  the Panama Canal, steaming through the Eastern and Western Pacific, operating with the Pacific and Seventh Fleets. She reached the Gilberts 19 November 1943, in time to help secure Makin Island” (Ref.1-Monterey & 72).

USS Lexington (CV-16)

Lant

Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

 

 

July 1943

9 Aug 1943

West Coast Transfer WW II

USS Lexington (CV-16) was commissioned 17 February 19 43, with Capt. Felix B. Stump in command. After Caribbean shakedown and yard work at Boston, Lexington sailed for the forward area, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting  the Panama Canal, steaming through the Eastern and Western Pacific, operating with the Pacific and Seventh Fleets, arriving Pearl Harbor 9 August 1943” (Ref. 1-Lexington).

USS Princeton (CV-23)

Lant

Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

WestPac

Air

Group 23

 

July 1943

9 Aug 1943

West Coast Transfer WW II

“Following shakedown in the Caribbean, and reclassification to CVL-23 on 15 July 1943, USS Princeton (CV-23) with Air Group 23 embarked, got underway for the Pacific, bound for the forward area, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting  the Panama Canal, steaming through the Eastern and Western Pacific, operating with the Pacific and Seventh Fleets. Arriving at Pearl Harbor 9 August 1943, she sortied with Task Force (TF) 11 on the 25th and headed for Baker Island. There she served as flagship, Task Group (TG) 11.2, and provided air cover during the occupation of the island and the construction of an airfield there, 1-14 September. During that time her planes downed Japanese Emily reconnaissance planes and, more importantly, furnished the fleet with photographs of them” (Ref. 1-Princeton & 72).

USS Yorktown (CV-10)

Lant

Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

WestPac

 

 

July 1943

9 Aug 1943

West Coast Transfer WW II

USS Yorktown (CV-10) remained in the Norfolk area until 21 May 1943 at which time she got underway for shakedown training in the vicinity of Trinidad. She returned to Norfolk on 17 June and began post-shakedown availability. The aircraft carrier completed repairs on 1 July and began air operations out of Norfolk until the 6th  On the latter day, she exited Chesapeake Bay on her way to the Pacific Ocean, bound for the forward area, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting  the Panama Canal on 11 July and departed Balboa on the 12th, steaming through the Eastern and Western Pacific, operating with the Pacific and Seventh Fleets, arriving in Pearl Harbor on 24 July 1943 and began a month of exercises in the Hawaiian Islands” (Ref. 1-Yorktown & 72).

USS Cowpens (CVL-25)

Lant

Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

WestPac

 

 

29 Aug 1943

19 Sep 1943

West Coast Transfer WW II

Departing Philadelphia 29 August 1943, USS Cowpens (CVL-25) bound for the forward area, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting  the Panama Canal, steaming through the Eastern and Western Pacific, operating with the Pacific and Seventh Fleets, arriving at Pearl Harbor 19 September to begin the active and distinguished war career which was to earn a Navy Unit Commendation” (Ref. 1-Cowpens & 72).

USS Bunker Hill (CV-17)

Lant

Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

 

 

Sep 1943

Sep 1943

West Coast Transfer WW II

USS Bunker Hill (CV-17) reported to the Pacific in the fall of 1943, bound for the forward area, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting  the Panama Canal, steaming through the Eastern and Western Pacific, operating with the Pacific and Seventh Fleets. USS Bunker Hill (CV-17)participated in carrier operations during the Rabaul strike (11 November 1943); Gilbert Islands operation, including support of the landings on Tarawa (13 November-8 December); the Kavieng strikes in support of the Bismarck Archipelago operation (25 December 1943, 1 and 4 January 1944); Marshall Islands operation (29 January-8 February); strikes against Truk (17-18 February), during which eight Japanese combatant vessels were sunk; Marinas raid (23 February); Palau-Yap-Ulithi-Woleai raids (30 March-1 April); Truk-Satawan-Ponape raids (29 April-1 May); Hollandia operation (21-28 April); and Marianas operation (12 June-10 August), including the Battle of the Philippine Sea” (Ref. 1-Bunker Hill & 72).

USS Cabot (CVL-28)

Lant

Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

WestPac

 

 

8 Nov 1943

2 Dec 1943

West Coast Transfer WW II

USS Cabot (CVL-28) sailed from Quonset Point, R.I., 8 November 1943 for Pearl Harbor, bound for the forward area, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting  the Panama Canal, steaming through the Eastern and Western Pacific, operating with the Pacific and Seventh Fleets, arriving Pearl Harbor 2 December” (Ref. 1-Cabot & 72).

USS Bataan (CVL-29), former CV-29 & Buffalo (CL-99) 8th & 7th

Lant

Caribbean    1st Panama Canal

EastPac Westpac

EastPac

2nd Panama Canal

Caribbean

Lant

 

 

After 17 Nov 1943

17 Oct 1945

Pacific

World War II

701 est. days

First transpacific voyage and first major deployment of World War II.

 

USS Bataan (CVL-29) was commissioned 17 November 1943, with Captain V. H. Schaeffer in command; and reported to the Pacific Fleet, most likely  transited from the East Coast to the West Coast through the Panama Canal” (Ref. 1-Bataan).

 

Received six battle stars during World War II.

USS San Jacinto (CVL-30)

Lant

Lant

Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

WestPac

 

 

Dec 1943

Jan 1944

West Coast Transfer WW II

USS San Jacinto (CVL-30) commissioned on 15 November 1943, with Capt. Harold M. Martin, in command. After shakedown in the Caribbean, San Jacinto sailed, bound for the forward area, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting  the Panama Canal, steaming through the Eastern and Western Pacific, to San Diego, Ca. and Pearl Harbor, Hawaii for the Pacific war zone,  operating with the Pacific and Seventh Fleets. Arriving at Majuro, Marshall Islands, she became part of the growing might of Vice Adm. Marc A. Mitscher's Task Force 58/38, the fast carrier striking force of the Pacific Fleet. There, San Jacinto embarked Air Group 51, whose fighters and torpedo planes would be the ship's chief weapons in battle” (Ref. 1-San Jacinto & 72).

USS Intrepid (CV-11)

Lant

Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

WestPac

 

 

3 Dec 1943

10 Jan 1944

West Coast Transfer WW II

“After training in the Caribbean USS Intrepid (CV-11) departed Norfolk 3 December 1943 for San Francisco, bound for the forward area, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting  the Panama Canal, steaming through the Eastern and Western Pacific, operating with the Pacific and Seventh Fleet, arriving Pearl Harbor 10 January 1944 and prepared for the invasion of the Marshall Islands, the next objective in the Navy's mighty is land-hopping campaign with Air Group 6 squadrons of VF-6 (37 F6F), VB-6 (36 SBD) and VT-6 (19 TBF) embarked from January 1944 to February 1944 (3 December 1943 to 10 January 1944)” (Ref. 1-Intrepid & 72).

USS Langley (CVL-27)

Lant

Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

 

 

6 Dec 1943

Jan 1944

West Coast Transfer WW II

USS Langley (CVL-27) departed Philadelphia 6 December 1943 for Pearl Harbor, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting  the Panama Canal, steaming through the Eastern and Western Pacific, operating with the Pacific Fleet, where she participated in training operations” (Ref. 1-Langley & 72).

USS Hornet (CV-12)

Lant

Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

WestPac

 

 

14 Feb 1944

20 Mar 1944

West Coast Transfer WW II

USS Hornet (CV-12) conducted shakedown training off Bermuda before departing Norfolk, Va.14 February 1944,  bound to for the forward area, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting  the Panama Canal, steaming through the Eastern and Western Pacific, operating with the Pacific and Seventh Fleets, to join the Fast Carrier Task Force 20 March at Majuro Atoll in the Marshalls” (Ref. 1-Hornet & 72).

USS Franklin (CV-13)

Lant

Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

 

 

Feb 1944

Mar 1944

West Coast Transfer WW II

USS Franklin (CV-13) commissioned on 31 January 1944, with Captain James M. Shoemaker in command. Franklin cruised to Trinidad for shakedown and soon thereafter departed in Task Group (TG) 27.7 for San Diego, Ca.  steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting  the Panama Canal, steaming through the Eastern and Western Pacific, operating with the Pacific Fleet, to engage in intensive training exercises preliminary to combat duty. In June she sailed via Pearl Harbor for Eniwetok where she joined TG 58.2. On the last day of June 1944 she sortied for carrier strikes on the Bonins in support of the subsequent Marianas assault” (Ref. 1-Franklin & 72).

USS Wasp (CV-18)

Lant

Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

WestPac

 

 

Mar 1944

4 Apr 1944

West Coast Transfer WW II

“On 10 January 1944, USS Wasp (CV-18) departed Boston; steamed to Hampton Roads, Va.; and remained there until the last day of the month, when she sailed for Trinidad, her base of operations through 22 February. She returned to Boston five days later and prepared for service in the Pacific. Early in March, the ship sailed south, bound to for the forward area, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting  the Panama Canal, steaming through the Eastern and Western Pacific, operating with the Pacific and Seventh Fleets, arriving at San Diego, Calif. 21 March and reached Pearl Harbor on 4 April. Following training exercises in Hawaiian waters, Wasp steamed to the Marshall Islands and at Majuro Rear Adm. Alfred E. Montgomery's newly formed Task Group (TG) 58.6 of Vice Adm. Marc A. Mitscher's Fast Carrier Task Force (TF 58)” (Ref. 1-Wasp & 72).

USS Ranger (CV-4)

Lant

Caribbean

3rd Panama Canal

EastPac

WestPac

 

 

11 July 1944

28 Jul 1944

West Coast Transfer WW II

“Touching at New York 16 May 1944, USS Ranger (CV-4) then entered the Norfolk Navy Yard to have her flight deck strengthened and for installation of a new type catapult, radar, and associated gear that provided her with a capacity for night fighter interceptor training. On 11 July 1944, she departed Norfolk, Va., bound for the forward area, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting  the Panama Canal 5 days later, and embarked several hundred Army passengers at Balboa for transportation to San Diego, Ca., steaming through the Eastern and Western Pacific, operating with the Pacific and Seventh Fleets, arriving San Diego 25 July. After embarking the men and aircraft of Night Fighting Squadron 102 and nearly a thousand Marines, she sailed for Hawaiian waters 28 July, reaching Pearl Harbor 3 August. During the next 3 months she conducted night carrier training operations out of Pearl Harbor” (Ref. 1-Ranger & 72).

USS Ticonderoga (CV-14)

Lant

Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

WestPac

Air

Group 89

 

30 July 1944

24 Sep 1944

West Coast Transfer WW II

USS Ticonderoga (CV-14) remained at Norfolk for almost two months outfitting and embarking Air Group 89. On 26 June 1944, the carrier shaped a course for the British West Indies. She conducted air operations and drills en route and reached Port of Spain, Trinidad, on the 30th. For the next 15 days, Ticonderoga trained intensively to weld her air group and crew into an efficient wartime team. She departed the West Indies on 16 July and headed back to Norfolk where she arrived on the 22nd. Eight days later, the carrier headed to for the forward area, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting  the Panama Canal, steaming through the Eastern and Western Pacific, operating with the Pacific and Seventh Fleets. She transited the canal on 4 September and steamed up the coast to San Diego the following day. On the 13th, the carrier moored at San Diego where she loaded provisions, fuel, aviation gas, and an additional 77 planes, as well as the Marine Corps aviation and defense units that went with them. On the 19th she sailed for Hawaii where she arrived five days later” (Ref. 1-Ticonderoga & 72).

USS Hancock (CV-19)

Lant

Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

WestPac

 

 

31 July 1944

5 Oct 1944

West Coast Transfer WW II

USS Hancock (CV-19) was commissioned 15 April 1944, Captain Fred C. Dickey in command. After fitting out in the Boston Navy Yard and shake-down training off Trinidad and Venezuela, Hancock returned to Boston for alterations 9 July. She departed Boston 31 July 1944, bound for the forward area, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting  the Panama Canal, steaming through the Eastern and Western Pacific, operating with the Pacific Fleet, en route to San Diego,  Ca. and Pearl Harbor and from there sailed 24 September to join Adm. W. F. Halsey's Third Fleet at Ulithi 5 October. She was assigned to Rear Adm. Bogan's Carrier Task Group 38.2” (Ref. 1-Hancock, 30 & 72).

USS Bennington (CV-20)

Lant

Caribbean Sea  1st Panama Canal

EastPac

WestPac

CVG-82

CVG-1

 

15 Dec 1944

7 Nov 1945

Transfer to the West Coast

Pacific

World War II

329 days

First transpacific voyage and first major deployment of World War II, operating out of Ulithi Atoll, Caroline Islands.

San Diego to Pearl Harbor

Bennington took part in the strikes against the Japanese home islands,
Iwo Jima Operations, Okinawa Gunto Operations
and Shares in sinking of Japan's super battleship YAMOTO.

 

Squadrons: VMF-123, F4U-1D's; VMF-112's, F4U; VT-82, TBM-3; VF-1, (AG-1); VF-1 (AG-1), F4U-D and VBF-1 (AG-1), F4U-D.

 

“On 15 December 1944, USS Bennington (CV-20) got underway from New York, bound for the forward area, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting  the Panama Canal on the 21st, steaming through the Eastern and Western Pacific, operating with the Pacific and Seventh Fleets. and transited the Panama Canal on the 21st. The carrier arrived at Pearl Harbor 8 January 1945 and then proceeded to Ulithi Atoll, Caroline Islands, where she joined TG 58.1, 8 February. Operating out of Ulithi she took part in the strikes against the Japanese home islands (16-17 and 25 February), Volcano Islands (18 February-4 March), Okinawa (1 March), and the raids in support of the Okinawa campaign (18 March-11 June). On 7 April Bennington's planes participated in the attacks on the Japanese task force moving through the East China Sea toward Okinawa which resulted in the sinking of the Japanese battleship Yamato, light cruiser Yahagi, and four destroyers. On 5 June the carrier was damaged by a typhoon off Okinawa and retired to Leyte for repairs, arriving 12 June. Her repairs completed, Bennington left Leyte 1 July and during 10 July-15 August took part in the final raids on the Japanese home islands. She continued operations in the western Pacific, supporting the occupation of Japan until 21 October 1945. On 2 September her planes participated in the mass flight over USS Missouri (BB-63) and Tokyo during the surrender ceremonies. Bennington arrived at San Francisco 7 November 1945 and early in March 1946 transited the Panama Canal en route to Norfolk. Following pre-inactivation overhaul, she went out of commission in reserve at Norfolk 8 November 1946” (Ref. 1-Bennington).

USS Randolph (CV-15)

Lant

Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

Air Group 87

 

Dec 1944

31 Dec 1944

West Coast Transfer WW II

 “USS Randolph (CV-15) was commissioned 9 October 1944, with Capt. Felix Baker in command. Following shakedown off Trinidad, Randolph got underway bound for the forward area, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting  the Panama Canal, steaming through the Eastern and Western Pacific, operating with the Pacific and Seventh Fleets. On 31 December she reached San Francisco where Air Group 87 was detached and Air Group 12 reported on board for four months duty” (Ref. 1- Randolph & 72).

USS Shangri-la (CV-38)

Lant

Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

WestPac

 

 

17 Jan 1945

15 Feb 1945

West Coast Transfer WW II

USS Shangri-la (CV-38) completed fitting out at Norfolk and took her shakedown cruise to Trinidad, B.W.I., between 15 September and 21 December 1944, at which time she returned to Norfolk. On 17 January 1945, she stood out of Hampton Roads, formed up with the large cruiser USS Guam (CB-2) and USS Harry E. Hubbard (DD-748), bound for the forward area, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet. The three ships arrived at Cristobal, C.Z., on the 23rd and transited the Panama Canal on the 24th, steaming through the Eastern and Western Pacific, operating with the Pacific and Seventh Fleets. Shangri-La departed from Balboa, C.Z., on 25 January and arrived at San Diego, Calif., on 4 February. There she loaded passengers, stores, and extra planes for transit to Hawaii and got underway on 7 February. Upon her arrival at Pearl Harbor on 15 February, she commenced two months of duty, qualifying land-based Navy pilots in carrier landings” (Ref. 1-Shangri-la & 72).

USS Franklin (CV-13)

EastPac

2nd Panama Canal

Caribbean

Lant

 

 

March 1945

28 Apr 1945

East Coast Transfer WW II

“Before dawn on 19 March 1945, USS Franklin (CV-13) who had maneuvered closer to the Japanese mainland than had any other U.S. carrier during the war, launched a fighter sweep against Honshu and later a strike against shipping in Kobe Harbor. Suddenly, a single enemy plane pierced the cloud cover and made a low level run on the gallant ship to drop two semi-armor piercing bombs. One struck the flight deck centerline, penetrating to the hangar deck, effecting destruction and igniting fires through the second and third decks, and knocking out the combat information center and airplot. The second hit aft, tearing through two decks and fanning fires which triggered ammunition, bombs and rockets. Franklin, within 50 miles of the Japanese mainland, lay dead in the water, took a 13° starboard list, lost all radio communications, and broiled under the heat from enveloping fires. Many of the crew were blown overboard, driven off by fire, killed or wounded, but the 106 officers and 604 enlisted who voluntarily remained saved their ship through sheer valor and tenacity. The casualties totaled 724 killed and 265 wounded, and would have far exceeded this number except for the heroic work of many survivors. Among these were Medal of Honor winners, Lt. Cmdr. Joseph T. O'Callahan, S. J., USNR, the ship's chaplain, who administered the last rites organized and directed firefighting and rescue parties and led men below to wet down magazines that threatened to explode, and Lt. (j.g.) Donald Gary who discovered 300 men trapped in a blackened mess compartment, and finding an exit returned repeatedly to lead groups to safety. USS Santa Fe (CL-60) similarly rendered vital assistance in rescuing crewmen from the sea and closing Franklin to take off the numerous wounded. Franklin was taken in tow by USS Pittsburgh (CA 72) until she managed to churn up speed to 14 knots and proceed to Pearl Harbor where a cleanup job permitted her to sail under her own power to Brooklyn, N.Y., steaming  through the Eastern Pacific, transiting the Panama Canal to the Caribbean Sea to the Atlantic, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, arriving Brooklyn, N.Y on 28 April” (Ref. 1-Franklin & 72).

USS Bon Homme Richard (CV-31) - 8th

Lant

Caribbean    1st Panama Canal

EastPac

WestPac

CVG-16

CVG(N)-91

CVG-88 CVG-2

 

19 Mar 1945

20 Oct 1945

World War II

304-days

First transpacific voyage and first major deployment toward the end of World War II.

From 19 March 1945 to 16 January 1946, Bon Homme Richard made trans-Pacific voyages out of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, assigned to Operation Magic Carpet personnel transportation service returning servicemen to the United States.

 

Squadrons: VF-781, F9F-2B; VF-783, F4U-4; VF-874, F4U-4 and VA-923, AD-3 & AD-4Q.

 

USS Bon Homme Richard (CV-31) departed Norfolk 19 March 1945, bound for the forward area, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting  the Panama Canal, steaming through the Eastern and Western Pacific, operating with the Pacific and Seventh Fleets, arriving at Pearl Harbor 5 April 1945. Following additional training in Hawaiian waters, the carrier joined TF 38 off Okinawa 6 June 1945” (Ref. 1- Bon Homme Richard & 72).

 

Received one battle stars for World War II service.

USS Antietam (CV-36) – 8th & Pacific Fleet

Lant

Caribbean    1st Panama Canal

EastPac

WestPac

EastPac

 

 

19 May 1945

late 1945 or early 1946

Pacific

West Coast Transfer

167-days+

First transpacific voyage and first major deployment toward the end of World War II operating off the coast of the Asian mainland in Chinese waters near Shanghai in the Yellow Sea.

 

USS Antietam (CV-36) departed Philadelphia 19 May 1945, bound for the forward area,  making a three-day stop at Norfolk, Va., the warship resumed her voyage, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting  the Panama Canal, steaming through the Eastern and Western Pacific, operating with the Pacific and Seventh Fleets, in company with USS Higbee (DD-806), USS George W. Ingram (APD-43), and USS Ira Jeffery (APD-44) on her home port transfer to the West Coast from the east coast (19 May to 10 June 1945)” (Ref. 1-Antietam & 72).

USS Tarawa (CV-40)

Lant

Caribbean

1st Panama Canal

EastPac

 

 

28 Jun 1945

15 Jul 1946

West Coast Transfer WW II

On 28 June 1945, USS Tarawa (CV-40) exited Hampton Roads bound for the forward area, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting  the Panama Canal early in July, steaming through the Eastern and Western Pacific, operating with the Pacific and Seventh Fleets, reaching San Diego, Ca. on 15 July 1946” (Ref. 1-Tarawa & 72).

USS Boxer (CV-21)

– 8th

Lant

Caribbean    1st Panama Canal

EastPac

West Pac

CVAG-19

 

17 Jul 1945

29 Jul 1945

Transfer to the West Coast

51-days

Home port transfer from Norfolk, Va. to San Francisco, California.

USS Langley (CVL-27)

WestPac

EastPac

2nd Panama Canal

Caribbean

Lant

 

 

1 Aug 1945

8 Aug 1945

West Coast Transfer WW II

“USS Langley (CVL-27) departed the East Coast 1 August 1945 for the forward area, steaming through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea to the South Atlantic, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting the Panama Canal, steaming through the Eastern and Western Pacific, reaching Pearl Harbor, Hawaii  8 August 1945. While there, word arrived that hostilities had ended (1 to 8 August 1945)” (Ref. 1-Langley & 72).

USS Randolph (CV-15)

EastPac

2nd Panama Canal

Caribbean

Lant

 

 

Sep 1945

15 Oct 1945

East Coast Transfer WW II

“Following the end of the war, USS Randolph (CV-15) headed home in late September 1945, sailing for the east coast, steaming through the Eastern Pacific, transiting the Panama Canal to the Caribbean Sea to the Atlantic, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, arriving at Norfolk, 15 October 1945, where she was rigged for the “Magic Carpet” service (September to 15 October 1945)” (Ref. 1- Randolph & 72).

USS Bataan (CVL-29)

WestPac

EastPac

2nd Panama Canal

Caribbean

Lant

 

 

Sep 1945

17 Oct 1945

East Coast Transfer WW II

“USS Bataan (CVL-29) returned to the United States, sailing for the east coast, steaming through the Eastern Pacific, transiting the Panama Canal to the Caribbean Sea to the Atlantic, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, arriving at New York 17 October 1945, and was assigned to “Magic Carpet” duty. On 10 January 1946 she arrived at Philadelphia to prepare for inactivation (September to 17 October 1945)” (Ref. 1-Bataan & 72).

USS Ranger (CV-4)

WestPac

EastPac

4th Panama Canal

Caribbean

Lant

 

 

30 Sep 1945

18 Oct 1945

East Coast Transfer WW II

“USS Ranger (CV-4) departed Pearl Harbor to train pilots for combat duty. Operating out of San Diego under Commander, Fleet Air, Alameda, she continued training air groups and squadrons along the California coast throughout the remainder of the war, departing San Diego, Calif. 30 September 1945, Ranger, steamed through the Eastern Pacific, embarked civilian and military passengers at Balboa the Canal Zone, via the Panama Canal to the Caribbean Sea to the Atlantic, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet and then steamed for New Orleans, arriving 18 October. Following Navy Day celebrations there, she sailed 30 October for brief operations at Pensacola. After calling at Norfolk, she entered the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard 18 November for overhaul. She remained on the eastern seaboard until decommissioned at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard 18 October 1946. Struck from the Navy list 29 October 1946, she was sold for scrap to Sun Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., Chester, Pa., 28 January 1947(September to 18 October 1945)” (Ref. 1-Ranger & 72).

USS Langley (CVL-27)

WestPac

EastPac

2nd Panama Canal

Caribbean

Lant

 

 

1 Oct 1945

6 Jan 1946

East Coast Transfer WW II

“USS Langley (CVL-27) completed two "Magic Carpet" voyages to the Western Pacific, and got underway 1 October for Philadelphia and then sailed for the east coast, steaming through the Eastern Pacific, transiting the Panama Canal to the Caribbean Sea to the Atlantic, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, returning to Philadelphia 6 January 1946 and was assigned to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet, Philadelphia Group, 31 May 1946  (1 October 1945 to 6 January 1946)” (Ref. 1-Langley & 72).

USS Enterprise (CV-6)

WestPac

EastPac

2nd Panama Canal

Caribbean

Lant

 

 

Oct 1945

17 Oct 1945

East Coast Transfer WW II

“On 14 May 1945, the "Big E" suffered her last wound of World War II when a suicide plane destroyed her forward elevator, killing 14 and wounding 34 men. USS Enterprise (CV-6) sailed for repairs at the Puget Sound Navy Yard, arriving 7 June 1945. Restored to peak condition, Enterprise voyaged to Pearl Harbor, returning to the States with some 1,100 servicemen due for discharge, then sailed on to New York, arriving 17 October 1945, steaming through the Eastern Pacific, transiting the Panama Canal, and entered the Caribbean Sea, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet. Two weeks later she proceeded to Boston through the Atlantic for installation of additional berthing facilities, then began a series of "Magic Carpet" voyages to Europe, bringing more than 10,000 veterans home in her final service to her country (October to 17 October 1945)” (Ref. 1-Enterprise & 72).

USS Cabot (CVL-28)

WestPac

EastPac

2nd Panama Canal

Caribbean

Lant

 

 

Oct 1945

9 Nov 1945

East Coast Transfer WW II

“Embarking homeward-bound men at Guam, USS Cabot (CVL-28) arrived at San Diego, Calif. 9 November 1945, then sailed for the east coast, steaming through the Eastern Pacific, transiting the Panama Canal to the Caribbean Sea to the Atlantic, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet. After refresher training at Pearl Harbor, Cabot launched strikes on Wake Island on 1 August 1945 while en route to Eniwetok. Here she remained on training duty until the end of the war. Sailing 21 August, she joined TG 38.3 to support the landings of occupation troops in the Yellow Sea area in September and October 1945(October to 9 November 1945)” (Ref. 1-Cabot & 72).

USS Bennington (CV-20) – 2nd & Pacific Fleet

Lant

Caribbean Sea  1st Panama Canal

EastPac

WestPac

CVG-82

CVG-1

 

15 Dec 1945

7 Nov 1945

Transfer to the West Coast

Pacific

World War II

329 days

First transpacific voyage and first major deployment of World War II, operating out of Ulithi Atoll, Caroline Islands.

San Diego to Pearl Harbor

Bennington took part in the strikes against the Japanese home islands,
Iwo Jima Operations, Okinawa Gunto Operations
and Shares in sinking of Japan's super battleship YAMOTO.

 

Squadrons: VMF-123, F4U-1D; VMF-112, F4U; VT-82, TBM-3; VF-1, (AG-1), F4U-1D; VF-1 (AG-1), F4U-1D and VBF-1 (AG-1), F4U-1D.

 

“On 15 December 1944, USS Bennington (CV-20) got underway from New York, bound for the forward area, steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, while operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting  the Panama Canal on the 21st, steaming through the Eastern and Western Pacific, operating with the Pacific and Seventh Fleets. and transited the Panama Canal on the 21st. The carrier arrived at Pearl Harbor 8 January 1945 and then proceeded to Ulithi Atoll, Caroline Islands, where she joined TG 58.1, 8 February. Operating out of Ulithi she took part in the strikes against the Japanese home islands (16-17 and 25 February), Volcano Islands (18 February-4 March), Okinawa (1 March), and the raids in support of the Okinawa campaign (18 March-11 June). On 7 April Bennington's planes participated in the attacks on the Japanese task force moving through the East China Sea toward Okinawa which resulted in the sinking of the Japanese battleship Yamato, light cruiser Yahagi, and four destroyers. On 5 June the carrier was damaged by a typhoon off Okinawa and retired to Leyte for repairs, arriving 12 June. CVG-82 departed Bennington on 17 June 1945. Geometric ship's aircraft ID, double arrow pointing up. departed for the United States on 17 June 1945 embarked in USS White Plains (CVE-66) for transit back to the States on 17 June 1945. The rest was well earned. Her repairs completed, Bennington left Leyte 1 July and during 10 July-15 August took part in the final raids on the Japanese home islands. She continued operations in the western Pacific, supporting the occupation of Japan until 21 October 1945. On 2 September her planes participated in the mass flight over USS Missouri (BB-63) and Tokyo during the surrender ceremonies. Bennington arrived at San Francisco 7 November 1945 and early in March 1946 transited the Panama Canal en route to Norfolk. Following pre-inactivation overhaul, she went out of commission in reserve at Norfolk 8 November 1946” (Ref. 1-Bennington). During the four and one-half months of intensive combat, the Air Group shot down 167 enemy planes destroyed 220 aircraft on the ground and damaged an additional 150-200. It had helped to break the back of the Imperial Air Force. The price it paid for its accomplishments was heavy. Forty pilots and 13 aircrewmen (25 percent of the compliment) were listed as lost or missing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ref. 1- U.S. Navy

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS RECORD OF

EAST/WEST COAST TRANSFERS AND TRANSITS

(Panama Canal, Cape Horn, Cape of Good Hope and Suez Canal)

 

Summary Total - September 1945 to Present

 

U. S. Aircraft Carrier Deployments and or both Panama Canal, Cape Horn, Cape of Good Hope and Suez Canal Transits and East /West Coast Transfers

Panama Canal, Cape Horn, Cape of Good Hope and Suez Canal Transits and East Coast/West Coast Transfers

 

Part I of VIII – 1928 to 1945

Part II of VIII – 1946 to 1969

Part III of VIII – 1970 to 1989

Part IV of VIII – 1990 to 1993

Part V of VIII – 1994 to 2000

Part VI of VIII – 2001 to 2005

Part VII of VIII – 2006 to 2012

Part VIII of VIII – 2013 to Present

Panama Canal, Cape Horn and Suez Canal Transits and East Coast/West Coast Transfers

Part I of VIII – 1928 to 1945

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4