U. S. Navy/Marine Aircraft

Part I of VIII - CVW, VFA, VMFA, VMA & VMFA(AW)

Part II of VIII - CACCLW, VAW, VAQ & VMAQ

Part III of VIII - VQ, CFLSW & COMFLELOGSUPPWING

Part IV of VIII - TACAMO, FLELOGSUPPRON, CFLSW, VR & Cnic // Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base New Orleans

Part V of VIII - VRC & VS

Part VI of VIII - VFC & CNATRA

Part VII of VIII - Naval Training Aircraft Photos; UAV Squadrons; COMOPTEVFOR, VX / HX - Air Test and Evaluation Squadron, CPRW-2, CPRW-5, CPRW-10, CPRW-11 and VP

Part VIII of VIII – VT

 

Training Squadron

 

VT-1

VT-2

VT-2B

VT-3

VT-4

VT-5

VT-5A

VT-6

VT-7

VT-8

VT-9

VT-10

VT-11

VT-12

VT-13

VT-14

VT-15

VT-16

VT-19

VT-21

VT-22

VT-23

VT-24

VT-25

VT-26

VT-27

VT-28

VT-29

VT-30

VT-31

VT-35

VT-80

VT-86

 

 

 

Insignias Proceed Selection

History Proceed Selection

Aircraft Location Proceed Selection

 http://www.vpnavy.com/vt.html

 

Training Squadron

 

“There are three types of fixed wing training squadrons - Primary, Intermediate, and Advanced - that train Student Naval Aviators to become United States Naval Aviators and Naval Flight Officers in the Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard. Some United States Air Force pilots are also trained in Navy squadrons. Likewise, some Student Naval Aviators receive some of their training at USAF training squadrons. Navy training aircraft are typically painted orange and white” (Ref. List of United States Navy aircraft squadrons - Wikipedia & Navy web site).

 

Navy – Home / Facebook

Public History Web Site

VT-1 / VT-1

VT-2 / VT-2

VT-2B / VT-2B

Eaglets

VT-1

NAS Saufley Field, Pensacola, Florida
VT-1 Established: 00XXX56 | Disestablished 1 Oct. 1977

 

VT-2

VT-2.png

Doerbirds

T-34

Primary
NAS Whiting Field, Florida

Images for VT-2 navy

Redesignated 1 May 1960 – Present

VT-2B

BTG-2

 

VT-3 / VT-3

VT-4 / VT-4

VT-5 / VT-5

VT-3 / VT-3

Vt3 insig.jpg

Red Knights

T-6B

Primary
NAS Whiting Field, Florida


VT-3 Established: ?
Redesignated 1 May 1960 – Present

VT-4 / VT-4 / VT-4 / VT-4

Vt-4 patch.jpg

Warbucks

T-6A
T-39
T-1A

NFO Primary/Intermediate
NAS Pensacola, Florida

Redesignated 1 May 1960 – Present

VT-5 / VT-5

Squadron Logo
Pussy Cats
VT-5 Established: 1943 |
Disestablished 1  Oct. 1977

 

VT-6 / VT-6

VT-7 / VT-7

VT-5A

Comm. 1 July 1927 - Present

VT-6 / VT-6

Vt6 insig.jpg

Shooters

T-6B

Primary
NAS Whiting Field, Florida

Redesignated 1 May 1960 – Present

VT-7 / VT-7

Vt7 insig.jpg

Strike Eagles T-45

Intermediate Tailhook, Advanced Jet
NAS Meridian, Mississippi Redesignated 1 July 1960 – Present

VT-8 / VT-8

VT-9 / VT-9

VT-10 / VT-10

VT-8 / VT-8

History not available or never existed

 

VT-9 / VT-9 / VT-9

Vt9.gif

Tigers

T-45

Intermediate Tailhook, Advanced Jet
McCain Field, U.S. Naval Air Station, Meridian, Mississippi

Comm. In 1929 – Present

VT-10 / VT-10 / VT-10

TRARON10.jpg

Wildcats

T-6A
T-1A

NFO Primary/Intermediate
NAS Pensacola, Florida

Redesignated: 15 Jan. 1968 – Present

VT-11 / VT-11

VT-12 / VT-12

VT-13 / VT-13

VT-11 / VT-11

Saufley's Satans

History not available

VT-12 / VT-12

History not available or never existed

VT- VT-13 / VT-13

History not available or never existed

VT-14 / VT-14

VT-15 / VT-15

VT-16 / VT-16

VT-14 / VT-14

History not available or never existed

VT-15 / VT-15

History not available or never existed

VT-16 / VT-16

History not available or never existed

VT-19 / VT-19

VT-21 / VT-21

VT-22 / VT-22

VT-19 / VT-19

Fighting Frogs
Established: 2 Aug. 1971

Redesignated VT-9 in 1998 – Present

VT-21 / VT-21

Vt21a insig.jpg

Fighting Redhawks

T-45

Intermediate Tailhook, Advanced Jet
NAS Kingsville, Texas

ATU-202 Established: in Apr. 1951

Redesignated 1 May 1960 – Present

VT-22 / VT-22

VT-22 logo.png

Golden Eagles

T-45

Intermediate Tailhook, Advanced Jet
NAS Kingsville, Texas

Established: 13 June 1949 – Present

VT-23 / VT-23

VT-24 / VT-24

VT-25 / VT-25

VT-23 / VT-23

Professionals

VT-23 Redesignated 1 May 1960

Disestablished in 1999

VT-24 / VT-24

Bobcats

VT-24 Disestablished 18 Sep. 1992

 

VT-25 / VT-25

Cougars

NAAS Corry Field, Pensacola, Florida
VT-25 Disestablished 18 Sep. 1992

VT-26 / VT-26

VT-27 / VT-27

VT-28 / VT-28

VT-26 / VT-26

Flying Tigers

VT-26 Disestablished in 1992

 

VT-27 / VT-27

Vt27a insig.jpg

Boomers

T-34

Primary
NAS Corpus Christi, Texas

Redesignated 1 July  1960 – Present

VT-28 / VT-28

VT-28.png

Rangers

T-34

Primary
NAS Corpus Christi, Texas

Redesignated 1 May 1960 – Present

VT-29 / VT-29

VT-30 / VT-30

VT-31 / VT-31

VT-29 / VT-29

NAS Corpus Christi, Texas

History not available

VT-30/ VT-30

History not available or never existed

 

VT-31 / VT-31

Vt31 b insig.jpg

Wise Owls

T-44

Advanced Multi-engine
NAS Corpus Christi, Texas

Redesignated 1 May 1960 – Present

VT-35 / VT-35

VT-80 / VT-80

VT-86 / VT-86

VT-35 / VT-35

VT-35.png

Stingrays

TC-12

Advanced Multi-engine
NAS Corpus Christi, Texas

VT-80 / VT-80

History not available or never existed

VT-86 / VT-86

VT-86 logo.png

Sabrehawks

T-39
T-45C

T-39N/G Sabreliner

McDonnell Douglas / Boeing T-45C Goshawk

NFO Advanced Jet
NAS Pensacola, Florida

 

Training Squadron TWO (VT-2), the Navy's oldest primary training squadron, was born from Basic Training Group TWO and commissioned on May 1, 1960, at NAS Whiting Field. VT-2's mission is to provide primary and intermediate stage flight training to selected student aviators of the United States Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, and several allied nations.

 

Training Squadron TWO graduates approximately 210 students each year. Logging nearly 2,000 flight hours each month VT-2 has flown in excess of 1,800,000 flight hours and trained more than 19,000 students since its commissioning” (Ref. https://www.cnatra.navy.mil/tw5/vt2/index.asp).

 

VT-2
Squadron Logo
Tail Code: [2G]
Name: Doerbirds
BTG-2
VT-2 Established: 06JUL26
VT-2B Redesignated: 01JUL27
VT-3 Redesignated: 01JUL37
VA-4A Redesignated: 01JUL37
VA-35 Redesignated: 01JUL37 | Disestablished 15FEB50
VT-2 Redesignated: 01MAY60

http://www.vpnavy.com/vt2.html

VT-2B
BTG-2

VT-2 Established: 06JUL26
VT-2B Redesignated: 01JUL27
VT-3 Redesignated: 0
VA-35 Redesignated: 01JUL37 | Disestablished 15FEB50
VT-2 Redesignated: 01MAY60

http://www.vpnavy.com/vt2b.html

“Training Squadron Three (VT-3) was commissioned on May 1, 1960, at South Whiting Field. Its primary mission at the time was to instruct student Naval Aviators in radio instruments, formation flying, and air-to-air gunnery. The primary aircraft at that time was the T-28 Trojan. Air-to-air gunner was discontinued in January 1965 and familiarization and basic instrument training was added in its place. In 1973, VT-3 moved to its present location at North Whiting Field.

 

In 1980, VT-3 became one of the few commands selected to be alternately commanded by a Navy or Marine Corps officer. The Red Knights were honored again in 1994 when they became the Navy's first and only joint primary flight training squadron. The first Air Force instructors reported in February 1994 and the first Air Force students followed in July of that same year. VT-3 now alternates Navy and Air Force commanding officers” (Ref. http://www.cnatra.navy.mil/tw5/vt3/index.asp).

 

“With World War II raging in both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and the demand for trained pilots at its peak, the first squadron to bear the name Training Squadron Three was created. On February 15, 1943 (one week after the beginning of the massive air raids against Bougainville and Rabaul in the Solomon Islands) Training Squadron Three Detachment 8-B (VN3D8-b) was organized under the command of LT Thomas Bradbury USN at Saufley Field, Pensacola, Florida. VN3D8-B was relocated to Whiting Field, Milton, Florida on July 1, 1943 and was later joined by VN3D8-a from Chevalier Field to form Training Squadron Three. (Interesting to note, naval training squadrons during the Second World War were identified by the designator "VN". The "VT" designator, used by current Naval training squadrons, was used to denote Torpedo Bomber squadrons.) Throughout the costly struggle with the Axis forces, Training Squadron Three continued to train pilots in order replace those lost in combat/training operations and to man the units which would be needed for the final campaigns against the Japanese mainland. On Sept. 2, 1945, following months of punishment by American forces, the Japanese military government signed the terms of surrender, and the struggle which had claimed the lives of millions came to a sudden halt. Eighteen months later in 1947, with little need for multiple training squadrons with which to train an enormous invasion force, VN-3 was decommissioned. VN-3 took its place in annals of Naval History as a squadron which took great pride in preparing the cream of America's youth for the defense of this nation and its ideals.

The current Red Knights of Training Squadron Three picked up the torch lit by their predecessors on May 1, 1960 and continued the legacy of "Training the Best for America's Defense". On that day Training Squadron Three (VT-3) was commissioned at South Whiting Field. Although the country was not at war (the Vietnam War would not reach its height until 8 years later) the squadron was tasked--utilizing the T-28 Trojan -- to prepare a younger generation of student naval aviators in radio instruments, formation flying, and air-to-air gunnery.

 

In 1965, the air-to air gunnery was discontinued and flight familiarization and basic instrument training were added in its place. In 1968, at the height of the Vietnam War, VT-3 was at its peak in size and consisted of 174 instructors, 494 students, 649 enlisted and 162 T-28 aircraft. By the end of 1968, VT-3 had flown almost 110,000 instructional hours and trained 902 students in the basic prop-training course for that calendar year. These figures represent the record for any training squadron in the history of the Naval Air Training command. With the Vietnam War decreasing in intensity in the early 70's, VT-3, like most other military commands, began to downsize.

 

VT-3 remained at South Whiting Field for thirteen years until 1973, when the squadron joined VT-2 at North Whiting Field to make room for newly formed helicopter training squadrons at South Field. The squadron has remained in these spaces since. Although the squadron hasn. t moved locations for the past 27 years, it has undergone some significant changes. In April of 1977, VT-3 began the official transition from the T-28 Trojan to the T-34C Turbo Mentor. In addition, the squadron began to utilize extensive simulated flight instruction and introduced the Cockpit Procedure Trainer into the training syllabus. The first student completed the new T-34C syllabus in Aug 1978.

 

In 1980, Training Squadron Three became the only one of the primary fixed wing training squadrons to be alternately commanded by a Navy and Marine Corps officer. LtCol G.A. Brown was the first Marine Corps Commanding Officer from 1980-1981. In 1994 The Red Knights were honored again when they became the Navy's first and only joint service primary flight training squadron. The first Air Force instructors reported in February 1994, and the first Air Force students followed in July of that same year. LtCol Shawn Elliott was the first Air Force Commanding Officer from 1995-1996. VT-3 now alternates between Navy and Air Force Commanding Officers.

 

In 1997(??), VT-3 was selected as the first Navy squadron to transition to and fly the new joint primary training aircraft: the T-6 Texan II.

 

The Red Knights of Training Squadron Three continue to provide the highest quality training to student aviators from the Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, Air Force, and several allied nations. Each student is instructed in day and night familization, precision aerobatics, basic and radio instruments, and primary and intermediate formation. Upon completion of their training, students are selected for further training in the naval helicopter, maritime, strike, or E-2/C-2 communities, and the USAF fighter/bomber, tanker/transport, or helicopter communities. Each of the approximately 65 flight instructors, 4 enlisted, and 11 civilian personnel assigned to VT-3 take great pride in being an integral part in the training of student aviators. Their combined effort has been responsible for approximately 22,000 flight hours and the successful completion of over 212 primary and 190 intermediate students per year” (Reef.

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/vt-3.htm).

 

VT-3
Tail Code: [2W]
Name: Red Knights
VT-3 Established: 00XXX00
VA-3A Redesignated: 15NOV46
VT-3 Redesignated: 01MAY60

http://www.vpnavy.com/vt3.html

VT-4 Training Squadron 4 is a training squadron of the United States Navy. Initially established as Basic Training Group NINE (BTG-9) in the 1950s, the squadron was redesignated as Training Squadron FOUR (VT-4) on May 1, 1960 and based at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida.

 

Primary and Intermediate flight school for USN and USMC Naval Flight Officers (NFO) and USAF Weapon Systems Officers (WSO).

 

The squadron's radio callsign is Buck.

 

Its original mission was providing flight instruction for US Navy and US Marine Corps Student Naval Aviators in the basic jet training syllabus utilizing the T-2A version of the T-2 Buckeye aircraft” (Ref. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VT-4 &

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Training_Squadron_4).

 

VP-30 began a new era in naval flight officer (NFO) training recently by conducting their first NFO winging ceremony. This ceremony was the result of the Chief of Naval Air Training's (CNATRA) trial initiative known as the Undergraduate Maritime Flight Officer (UMFO) Program. Through this initiative, CNATRA hopes to streamline the P-3 NFO training pipeline while providing the maritime patrol community a better product. During the ceremony, VP-30's Commanding Officer Capt. Tim Brewer awarded NFO wings to: Ensigns Jon Baccus, Jesse Cleland, Drew Mickleth wait and Justin Rogers. The event and reception drew family members and friends from around the country. For Rogers, a Jacksonville native and former aviation warfare systems operator at VP-45, this designation brings extra significance as he has exchanged his service in a support capacity, for a top leadership position within a P-3 tactical crew. The recipients have completed the undergraduate maritime flight officer syllabus, earning their wings. The four will now enroll in the CAT 1 fleet replacement squadron (FRS) syllabus. Their anticipated graduation date is scheduled for Feb. 9. Upon their graduation at VP-30, they will report to various operational patrol squadrons to begin their initial sea tour. The NFO training pipeline begins with aviation preflight introduction (API) instruction in Pensacola, Fla. After completing API, all student NFOs report for primary training at VT-10 or VT-4, also at NAS Pensacola, Florida. In the traditional training track, multi-engine designated NFOs attend advanced navigation training at Randolph AFB in San Antonio, Texas.

Upon completion of this course, they are awarded their wings of gold prior to transferring to VP-30 where they receive P-3 FRS training. The four UMFOs reported directly to VP-30 following completion at VT-10 or VT-4. With the continued success of this experimental initiative, CNATRA may begin sending all maritime NFO's directly from primary flight training to VP-30, bypassing advanced training at Randolph AFB. The primary and VP-30 courses would add additional events to accommodate the loss of advanced training. As a result, the process would reduce current redundancies in training, reduce the number of PCS moves, create a focus on P-3 specific NFO training, all while reducing the overall training time by 10 weeks” (Ref.

http://www.vpnavy.com/vt4_history.html).

 

Training Squadron FOUR was commissioned on 1 May 1960 and assigned the mission of providing flight instruction in the basic jet training syllabus utilizing the T-2A aircraft. Training consisted of basic and radio instrument procedures, formation, night flying, air to air gunnery and carrier qualifications. In 1965, Training Squadron FOUR transitioned to the T-2B aircraft and changed its mission to become the Naval Air Training Command sole site for providing student pilots basic jet flight instruction in aerial gunnery and carrier qualification.

 

In 1971, Training Squadron FOUR transitioned to the T-2C aircraft. The squadron mission was changed once again, to provide flight training in all phases of the basic jet syllabus. In September 1972, Training Squadron FOUR acquired the TF-9J providing flight instruction in both basic and advanced jet training. This mission was unique in the Naval Air Training Command in that student pilots experienced their first flight in a jet aircraft in VT-4 and remained aboard to be subsequently designated Naval Aviators. November 1973 saw the introduction of the TA-4J to replace the aging TF-9J for advanced flight training. Beginning in December 1975, VT-4 had the added mission of providing flight instruction for allied foreign military pilots. Flight training has been given to student pilots from Kuwait, Spain, Singapore and Indonesia.

 

In addition to pilot training, VT-4 has had two other significant missions. From 1973 to 1978, VT-4 provided summer jet orientation flights for midshipmen of the United States Naval Academy and the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps. From 1975 to 1979, VT-4 was also responsible for the training of Naval Flight Surgeons. In December 1985, VT-4’s mission was changed from strike training to the sole site of E-2/C-2 intermediate training in CNATRA. In this role, the squadron carrier qualified Student Naval Aviators from the multiengine training pipeline, informally called the "prop ppipeline," who we selected to eventually fly the E-2 Hawkeye and C-2 Greyhound aircraft in the Fleet. Graduates of VT-4 would receive their wings and designations as Naval Aviators and proceed to the Fleet Replacement Squadron. In January 1992, VT-4’s mission became the E-2/C-2 advanced training site. To accomplish this mission VT-4 flew the T-2C.

 

During 1996, VT-4 underwent significant change. From a small all Navy Advanced E-2/C-2 pilot training squadron with a student throughput of 36 per year, it became a joint Primary and Intermediate Naval Flight Officer/Navigator training squadron with an annual student throughput of 450. Instructor ranks grew from fourteen Navy pilots to 71 Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force pilots and NFO/Navigators. The squadron transitioned from flying the T-2C to flying the T-34C Turbo Mentor and T-1A Jayhawk. VT-4 also instructs student navigators from Germany, Italy, Saudi Arabia, Norway and Denmark. From April to September 1996 the squadron had primary NFO/NAV and advanced pilot training being conducted simultaneously. Following the final CQ detachment in September, the mission converted entirely to NFO/NAV training. On 30 September 1996, the last VT-4 Naval Aviators earned their wings.

 

In January 2003, VT-4 initiated instructor orientation flights in the T-6A “Texan II”, the joint Air Force/Navy platform slated to replace the T-34C as the Primary phase syllabus trainer. The T-6A “Texan II” is a single engine, two-seat trainer which is fully aerobatic. It features a pressurized cockpit, a G-tolerance enhancement system and dual zero-zero ejection seats. The T-6A utilizes a state-of-the-art digital cockpit to help familiarize students with what they will encounter in their fleet tours. In August 2003, VT-4 marked its first training flight in the T-6A “Texan II”. In April 2005, VT-4 completed the transition to the T-6A “Texan II” and flew its last T-34C “Turbomentor” student sortie.

 

In December 2010, VT-4 officially became a part of Training Squadron 10. All VT-4 instructors and students became a part of VT-10 and the squadron officially answers to the VT-10 Commanding Officer.

 

Since its commissioning, VT-4 has amassed over 600,000 flight hours. The squadron has logged 42,000 carrier landings as 2012” (Ref. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VT-4;

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Training_Squadron_4 &

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/vt-4.htm).

 

VT-4
NAS Pensacola, Florida
Tail Code: [2F]
Name: Rubber Ducks
VT-4 Established: 00XXX00
VA-2A Redesignated: 15NOV46
VT-4 Redesignated: 01MAY60

http://www.vpnavy.com/vt4.html

VT-5
Squadron Logo
Tail Code: [2S]
Name: Pussy Cats
VT-5 Established: 1943 | Disestablished 01OCT77

VT-5A
VT-5A Established: 01JUL27

http://www.vpnavy.com/vt5a.html

Training Squadron SIX is home to "Instructor Pilots" of the United States Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard. The mission of VT-6 is to provide academic, flight, and other such training as may be directed by the Naval Air Training Command (NATRACOM)  to assigned Navy, Marine, Coast Guard, and Allied Forces Student Naval Aviators” (Ref. http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/vt-6.htm & http://www.cnatra.navy.mil/tw5/vt6/mission.asp).

 

Training Squadron SIX (VT-6) provides primary flight training to selected Student Naval Aviators (SNAs). Since its inception, VT-6 has flown a wide variety of naval training aircraft to include the TC-45, T-28, T-34, and now the T-6B. The squadron serves as an indoctrination point for Naval Aviation and takes pride in building professional U.S and International Aviators” (Ref.

http://www.cnatra.navy.mil/tw5/vt6).

VT-5
Squadron Logo
Tail Code: [2S]
Name: Pussy Cats
VT-5 Established: 1943 | Disestablished 01OCT77

VT-5A
VT-5A Established: 01JUL27

http://www.vpnavy.com/vt5a.html

 

 

VT-6's lineage goes back to the formation of the Multi-Engine Training Group (METG) that was established at NAS Forrest Sherman Field on 1 July 1956. At the time of the formation of the METG, prop students in the Basic Training Command received primary training in the T-34B and intermediate training in the T-28B/C. On May 1, 1960 the METG was re-designated Training Squadron SIX (VT-6) as the third primary flight training squadron for the United States Navy located in NAS Whiting Field Milton, Florida. Originally, the TC-45 was used in the advanced instrument training pipeline for students going to helicopters or Lighter-than-Air (LTA) training. VT-6 has served uninterrupted in this capacity since its commissioning providing the initial flight training education for essentially one fifth of all Navy and Marine Corps student Naval Aviators. An additional requirement placed upon all of the existing training squadrons currently includes the instruction of U.S. Coast Guard and U.S. Air Force aviators as well as international students from various allied nations” (Ref. http://www.cnatra.navy.mil/tw5/vt6/history.asp).

 

Training Squadron SIX (VT-6) was established in 1960 as the third primary flight training squadron for the United States Navy located in Pensacola, Florida” (Ref. http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/vt-6.htm).

 

“Since the establishment of VT-6 in 1960, there have been five aircraft used for student training: TC-45 Expeditor, T-28 Trojan, T-34B Mentor, T-34C Turbo Mentor and currently the T6-B Texan . Concurrent with the transition from the older more sturdy T-28 to the present T-6B there was a major modification in the mission of VT-6. During the era of the T-28, the training squadrons now referred to as "primary" squadrons were used to train pilots from entry level flight training to air-to-air combat, air-to-ground gunnery and ultimately, to land aboard the aircraft carrier. With the introduction of the T-34 and T-6B, and subsequently intermediate and advanced flight training, that mission was modified to provide only the initial training in aviation hence the derivation of the name "primary" training squadron” (Ref. http://www.cnatra.navy.mil/tw5/vt6/history.asp).

 

“In the time subsequent to its commissioning, the Navy's requirement for designated Naval Aviators has been in constant flux reaching a peak during the period ranging from the late 1970's through the end of the 1989. This increased requirement ran concurrent with the Reagan presidency and the concept of realizing the six-hundred ship navy and all capital assets, including personnel, required to support such an undertaking. During this time period, an additional training squadron was established in Corpus Christi, Texas to assist in the training of student aviators. VT-6 has served uninterrupted in this capacity for the past twenty-five years providing the initial flight training education for essentially one fourth of all Navy and Marine Corp student Naval Aviators. An additional requirement placed upon all of the existing training squadrons currently includes the instruction of twenty-five U.S. Coast Guard aviators as well as approximately fifty international students from various allied nations.

 

Since the establishment of VT-6 in 1960, there have been primarily only three aircraft used for student training. The T-28 Trojan, T-34B Mentor, and currently the T-34C Turbo Mentor which is essentially the same airframe as the "B" model but much improved with the addition of a turbine engine and a propeller with three blades. Concurrent with the transition from the older more sturdy T-28 to the present T-34B/C  there was a major modification in the mission of VT-6. During the era of the T-28, the training squadrons now referred to as "primary" squadrons were used to train pilots from entry level flight training to air-to-air combat, air-to-ground gunnery and ultimately to land aboard the aircraft carrier. With the introduction of the T-34, and subsequently intermediate and advanced flight training, that mission was modified to provide only the initial training in aviation hence the derivation of the name "primary" training squadron. This modification significantly narrowed the mission and objectives of the now "primary" flight training squadron VT-6.

 

Maintenance or repair work on the capital assets utilized by VT-6 was initially completed by squadron staff personnel. In recent years however, it has become more cost effective to sub-contract all maintenance to civilian contractors. This includes not only aircraft maintenance services but administrative, janitorial and general contracting as well for both aircraft and building upkeep. There were two major benefits realized by the implementation of this practice. First was the massive reduction in personnel requirements brought on by the removal of the maintenance department. Second was the removal of the necessity to dilute the efforts of the remaining squadron members to accomplish "housekeeping" tasks and other essential jobs not directly related to mission accomplishment. This allowed a more concerted effort to be directed towards operational tasking by squadron members.

 

Since the introduction of these sweeping changes over ten years ago, all of the Navy's Training Squadrons have been working within the framework provided by the Chief of Naval Education and Training (CNET) and higher authorities in the chain-of-command to provide the best possible training in the most efficient fashion possible. The squadron as it stands today is the culmination of years of trial and error, introspection, and countless iterations of the guidelines and procedures delineated for the successful training of naval aviators” (Ref. http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/vt-6.htm).

 

 

"Train Warriors and Develop Leaders"

 

VT-6
NAS Whiting Field, Milton, Florida
Tail Code: [2P]
Name: Shooters
Multi-Engine Training Group
VT-6 Redesignated: 01MAY60

http://www.vpnavy.com/vt6.html

“The "Eagles" of Training Squadron SEVEN (VT-7) have the mission of safely and effectively training the world's finest Naval Aviators and preparing them for service and success in the Fleet. Student Naval Aviators train for approximately twelve months in the fundamentals of strike aviation. Initial flights and simulators are devoted to Instrument Flight Rules, culminating in an instrument rating. In the Familiarization stage, students learn basic aircraft maneuvering, aerobatics, and landing skills foundational to the aircraft carrier environment. Numerous multi-aircraft flights provide requisite skills in two-plane, four-plane, and night formation flying. The second phase of flight training exposes students to manual air-to-ground bombing, Tactical Formation, Air Combat Maneuvering, and Operational Navigation at low altitude. Finally, students perform Field Carrier Landing Practice (FCLP) in preparation for their Carrier Qualifications (CQ). In order to become "tailhookers" and earn their Wings of Gold, students must safely complete four touch-and-goes and ten arrested landings aboard a carrier at sea.

 

VT-7 originated as a Naval Advanced Training Activity located at Naval Air Station Memphis, Tennessee. It was initially composed of two advanced training units. These were consolidated into Basic Training Group SEVEN, which employed the T-28 “Trojan” and T-29 “Seastar” to train student aviators in basic instrument flying. BTG-7 was designated as VT-7 in July, 1960, and relocated to NAS Meridian, Mississippi, one year later. VT-7 then split to form a “sister” squadron, Training Squadron NINE (VT-9) in December, 1961. In 1964, VT-7 won its first of eighteen Chief of Naval Operations Aviation Safety "S" Awards. A superior safety record and an aggressively professional approach to safeguarding lives and aircraft enabled the Command to again receive the CNO Safety Award in 2008.

The T-2 "Buckeye" was used in VT-7 from 1962 until 1971.

 

\The Command then transitioned to the Douglas TA-4J “Skyhawk” to train pilots for advanced strike missions. The first advanced strike student earned his Wings of Gold in the spring of 1972. The last Naval Aviator trained by VT-7 in the TA-4J graduated in 1999 when VT-7 transitioned to the Boeing T-45C "Goshawk." In its first year of Goshawk service, VT-7 flew over 18,000 sorties and made nearly 1,300 carrier landings. From January 2008 to May 2009, the Squadron flew more than 24,455 hours and winged 82 students trained by a staff of 45 Active Duty and 25 Reserve Instructor pilots. To date, the “Eagles” of VT-7 have winged more than 3,900 Naval and Marine Corps Aviators including 331 International Students from France, Italy, Kuwait, Spain, Thailand, Singapore, Taiwan, and Brazil. VT-7's Eagles are dedicated to their mission of training Student Naval Aviators, and will continue providing the fleet with the finest Naval Aviators in the world” (Ref. http://www.cnatra.navy.mil/tw1/vt7/index.asp).

 

The "EAGLES" of Training Squadron Seven originated as a Naval Advanced Training Activity located at Naval Air Station Millington, Memphis, Tennessee. Originally composed of two advanced training units, ATU-105 and ATU-205, in July 1958 they were consolidated into a single squadron, BTU-7. This Squadron used T-28 "Trojans" and T-29 "Seastars" to train student aviators in basic instrument flying.

 

In June 1960, the Squadron moved to Naval Air Station, Kingsville, Texas and began receiving the T2J-1 "Buckeye", a two-place jet trainer built by the North American Aviation Corporation and the forerunner of today's basic jet trainer. The Squadron was designated Training Squadron SEVEN (VT-7) in July 1960 and received the mission to provide training in jet transition, precision aerobatics, basic and radio instruments, formation, gunnery, and carrier qualifications.

 

In July of 1961, Training Squadron SEVEN moved to newly established NAS Meridian, MS. On 15 December 1961, the Squadron split to form a "sister" squadron, Training Squadron NINE. In 1964, Training Squadron SEVEN won its first of fifteen Chief of Naval Operations Aviation Safety Awards for representing not only a superior safety record, but also an aggressive and professional approach to safeguarding the lives of all personnel. 1999 marked the most recent year that Training squadron SEVEN yet again was awarded the CNO safety award. In October of 1970, the newest member of the "Buckeye" family, the twin-engine T-2C aircraft, made its appearance aboard Training Squadron SEVEN in response to the Navy's need for a more reliable and powerful training aircraft. A year later, in August 1971, a major change took place in the structure of the Naval Air Training Command.

 

Training Squadron NINE split to form a "sister" squadron, Training Squadron NINETEEN, and both squadrons began sharing the basic training role at Meridian. At that time, Training Squadron SEVEN transitioned to the Douglas TA-4J "Skyhawk" and took over the advanced strike missions including air-to-ground weapons delivery, low-level navigation, air combat maneuvering, and carrier qualifications. This allowed a flight student to complete both intermediate and advanced jet training at one Naval Air Station. Training Squadron SEVEN completed its first advanced strike student in the spring of 1972 when First Lieutenant L. C. Ernst received his "Wings of Gold". As of October 2000, the "Eagles" of Training Squadron SEVEN winged over 3,200 Naval and Marine Corps Aviators. Additionally, the Squadron trained over 200 International Students from France, Italy, Kuwait, Spain, Thailand, and Brazil.

 

Training Squadron SEVEN has received many awards throughout its history. In 1964, VT-7 was awarded its first of thirteen Chief of Naval Operations Aviation Safety Awards for representing not only a superior safety record, but also an aggressive and professional approach to safeguarding the lives of all personnel. In January of 1975, VT-7 completed its first accident-free year in the A-4 "Skyhawk," and in July of that same year amassed a total of 35,000 accident-free hours. In November 1981, the squadron received a unit commendation from Secretary of the Navy John Lehman for accomplishing the squadron's Pilot Training Requirement (PTR) for fiscal year 1980, while remaining accident free for the entire year. In 1994, the squadron was presented the Vice Admiral Goldthwaite Award, the Golden Anchor Award and the CNO Safety Award. They also received the Safety Award in 1995 and the Vice Adm. John H. Towers Flight Safety Award in 1996.

 

September 1999 marked the end of an era in Naval Aviation and Training Squadron SEVEN. After over 28 years of faithful service, the Eagles winged their last Naval Aviator in the venerable TA-4J, and the last Skyhawk flew from the VT-7 flightline. A new chapter began as Training Squadron SEVEN transitioned to the T-45C Goshawk. In its first year of Goshawk service, VT-7 flew over 18,000 sorties, accumulated over 21,000 flight hours, and 1295 Carrier landings. The student naval aviator pipeline takes approximately two years of intense flight training involving many hours of ground school, flight simulator work and close to 300 hours of flight time in three different aircraft. The students also accomplish a feat known only to a handful of pilots in the world -- they land jet aircraft on board an aircraft carrier, qualifying them as carrier aviators. There is a continuous pool of approximately 90 student naval aviators in VT-7 at any one tim” (Rrf. http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/vt-7.htm).

 

VT-7

Tail Code: [2M/2K]
Name: Strike Eagles
BTG-7 Activated: 01JUN58
VT-7 Redesignated: 01JUL60

http://www.vpnavy.com/vt7.html

VT-8 History

http://www.history.navy.mil/nan/backissues/1940s/1945/15oct45.pdf

 

VT-8

http://www.vpnavy.com/vt8.html

“Training Squadron NINE (VT-9) is the third naval squadron to be designated VT-9. The first VT-9 was commissioned in 1927 as a torpedo squadron, flying the Curtis T-3M Convertible Land/Seaplane. The second VT-9 was commissioned on December 15, 1961 at McCain Field, U.S. Naval Air Station, Meridian, Mississippi. On August 2, 1971, the VT-9 "Tigers" branched off to form its "sister" squadron, designated VT-19 "Frogs", and both squadrons then assumed the intermediate jet training role at Meridian. Training Squadron NINE was disestablished in July 1987 and consolidated with Training Squadron NINETEEN. On October 1, 1998, Training Squadron NINETEEN was re-designated as Training Squadron NINE and the "Tigers" were again reborn. In June 2004, the squadron completed the last Student Naval Aviator flight in the T-2C "Buckeye."

 

Presently, VT-9 is under the command of Commander Craig Snyder, USN. Its mission is to safely train Student Naval Aviators for the United States and other International Navies in the air strike mission. The squadron has trained International students from Spain, France, Brazil, and Italy. Training Squadron NINE currently operates the Boeing T-45C "Goshawk". Civilian maintenance contractors maintain the 89 T-45C aircraft flown by VT-9. Fidelity Technologies Corporation operates the T-45C flight simulator for the squadron. Student Naval Aviators and International Military Students are aboard VT-9 for approximately nine to twelve months and are trained in all of the fundamental stages of strike aviation. Many initial flights and simulators are devoted to Instrument training, which eventually culminates in an instrument rating. Sixteen day and four night flights are then devoted to the Familiarization stage. Here, students learn basic aircraft maneuvering, aerobatics, and carrier landing skills. Twenty-three Formation flights provide students the sound skills in both two and four plane Formation flying. These flights lay the foundation required during later tactical events. In the Weaponry stage, students learn fundamental ground weapon delivery procedures. Four Night Formation flights are followed by 10 flights focused on the basics of Air Combat Maneuvering. Finally, the students fly Field Carrier Landing Practices (FCLPs) in preparation for carrier qualifications, which consist of 4 touch-and-go landings and 10 carrier-arrested landings aboard a carrier at sea. Following this, the students receive their "Wings of Gold".

 

Training Squadron NINE's unprecedented safety record has culminated in ten Chief of Naval Operations Aviation Safety Awards. In 2005, the squadron was awarded the CNO Safety "S" from CNATRA. Training Squadron NINE's other recent awards include two Secretary of the Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation awards in recognition of exceeding the established goals of safety, quality, and projected training rates” (Ref. http://www.cnatra.navy.mil/tw1/vt9/index.asp).

 

Training Squadron NINE was commissioned on December 15, 1961 at McCain Field, U.S. Naval Air Station, Meridian, Mississippi. It is the third Naval squadron to be designated VT-9. The first VT-9 was commissioned in 1927 as a Torpedo Squadron, flying the Curtis T3-M Convertible Land/Seaplane. On August 2, 1971, VT-9 "Tigers" branched off to form its "sister" squadron designated VT-19 "Frogs", and both squadrons assumed the intermediate jet training role at Meridian. Training Squadron NINE was decommissioned in July 1987 and consolidated with Training Squadron NINETEEN. Training Squadron NINETEEN was redesignated Training Squadron NINE, 01 October 1998, and the "Tigers" were again reborn. The mission of VT-9 is to safely train the world's finest Naval Aviators for the United States and other international Navies in Intermediate Strike and Advanced E2/C2 training. International Student training has consisted of pilots for the Navies of Spain, France, Italy, Thailand, and also Kuwait's Air Force.

 

Training Squadron NINE is the only U.S. Navy pilot training squadron that operates the Rockwell T-2C "Buckeye" to accomplish its mission. A civilian maintenance contractor maintains the 78 T-2C aircraft flown by VT-9. Loral Aerospace Corporation operates T-2C flight simulators. Student Naval Aviators and International Military Students are aboard VT-9 for approximately four to six months and are trained in many fundamental skill stages of strike and carrier aviation. Initially, students fly several instrument flights focused on building a solid flight foundation for instrument scan. Sixteen day and four night flights are then devoted to the familiarization stage where students learn basic aircraft maneuvering, aerobatics, and carrier landing skills. The next stage in training is fifteen formation flights in two and four plane formations laying the foundation for tactical flying. Students then progress to eight air-to-air gunnery flights designed to develop the students' dynamic maneuvering flight abilities and situational awareness. Finally, ten sorties closely controlled by a Landing Signal Officer, culminate in a landing field qualification that designates the individual safe to train on an aircraft carrier. About 24 percent of VT-9 students are trained in the Advanced E-2/C-2 phase curriculum. For these students, the Air-to-Air Gunnery stage listed above is replaced by Carrier Qualification at-sea, including four touch and go landings and ten aircraft carrier arrested landings.

 

Upon successful completion of training at Training Squadron NINE, the E-2/C-2 students receive their coveted "Wings of Gold" and are transferred to the Fleet Replacement Squadron. The basic jet students move on to Advanced Strike Training in the McDonnell Douglas T-45 "Goshawk" where the Student Naval Aviators receive additional instruction in Air Combat maneuvering, Weaponry, and aircraft carrier landing qualification. Training Squadron NINE's record of achievement has culminated in five Chief of Naval Operations, Aviation Safety Awards over the years for sustaining an unprecedented safety record. The squadron was recently awarded the 1998 CNATRA Training Excellence Award. Training Squadron NINE's other awards include two Secretary of the Navy "Meritorious Unit Commendation" awards in recognition of exceeding the established goals of safety, quality, and projected training rates” (Ref. http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/vt-9.htm).

 

“The VT-9 Tigers is one of four U.S. Navy strike jet training squadrons and one of two based at Naval Air Station Meridian in Mississippi (The other two being based at Naval Air Station Kingsville in Texas). U.S. Naval and Marine aviators are trained by the Tigers, along with aviators of the British, Spanish, French and Italian Navies. The current commanding officer of the squadron is CDR Craig Snyder. The squadron flies the T-45C Goshawk, a U.S. Naval derivative of the British BAE Hawk jet aircraft. The students, selected from the very top performing students graduated from primary Flight training (usually trained in the T-6 Texan II Turboprop-jet), are initially trained over 1.5 to two years in basic and advanced aviation skills such as ground school, systems, weapons, aerodynamics, emergency procedures, and other academic course-work; dynamic simulator training; navigation and instrument flying, and progress through extensive formation and tactical flying, low-level navigation, bombing, air combat maneuvering ("dog fighting"). Student Naval Aviators normally complete the syllabus by performing a series of scrutinized arrested landings on an aircraft carrier. The syllabus is high-paced, difficult, and highly competitive; notable training attrition is expected. With this tailhook prerequisite complete, graduating students become "winged Naval Aviators", and then move on to fly a fighter and/or attack jet, with additional post-wing training in their respective combat service” (Ref. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VT-9).

 

VT-9


Tail Code: [2M]
Name: Tigers

http://www.vpnavy.com/vt9.html

Training Squadron TEN (VT-10) is a training squadron of the United States Navy. The squadron is homebased at NAS Pensacola, Florida.

 

Basic and intermediate flight school for Naval Flight Officers (NFO). VT-10 is tasked with training to go to advanced flight school in the United States Navy. NFOs come to VT-10 after graduating from Aviation Preflight Indoctrination "API".

 

In recent years the syllabus has been expanded to included all aspects of pilot training, up to but not including solo flight. The NFO training consists of navigation, communications, formation flying, low-level flight operations, amongst other smaller curricula.

 

VT-10 is a subordinate command to Training Air Wing 6 (TRAWING SIX).

 

The "Cosmic Cats" was the nickname for the squadron for many years, until it was deemed not be to very aggressive in the early 1990s. The Wildcat patch and name came to the front, and have been used almost exclusively.

 

For many years, the Squadron's main focus was on the safety of its instructors and students. The motto was adopted "If there is doubt, there is no doubt."

 

The squadron is homebased at NAS Pensacola, Florida, originally known as Forrest Sherman Field, named after former CNO Admiral Forrest Sherman.

 

The squadron's radio callsign is KATT.

 

Aircraft Flown

 

UC-45J Navigator

T-2A Buckeye

T-1A Sea Star

T-39D SabreLiner

TF-9J Cougar

T-2B Buckeye

T-34C Turbo Mentor

T-47A Citation

T-1A Jayhawk

T-6A Texan II

 

Awards

 

Training Squadron TEN has been awarded five Meritorious Unit Commendations and four Chief of Naval Education and Training “Shore/Technical Training Excellence Awards", the most recent in 2005. “Wildcat" safety initiatives have earned the squadron twenty one Chief of Naval Operations Safety Awards including one in 2005. The squadron was awarded the Towers Award for safety in 1978 and the Grandpaw Pettibone Safety Award in 2004 and 2005. VT-10's extensive energy conservation efforts and improved efficiency enabled the squadron to receive the 1995 and 1996 Secretary of the Navy Energy Conservation Awards. In 2005, VT-10 was presented with the VADM Robert Goldthwaite Award for Training Excellence, the squadrons fourth such award. VT-10's resourceful use of “Self Help” to significantly improve facilities resulted in the squadron being awarded the Chief of Naval Operations Bronze Hammer Award for 2000.

 

History

 

In 1960, Training Squadron TEN (VT-10) was established as a division of the Training Department of NAS Pensacola and was known as the Basic Naval Aviation Officers (BNAO) School. BNAO was developed in response to (1) the increasing importance of navigator and radar operator-type flying officers in the latest generation of multi-seat naval aircraft such as the A-3 Skywarrior, A-5 Vigilante, A-6 Intruder, F-4 Phantom II and P-2 Neptune and (2) in order to create a more standardized training program that better approximated that given to Student Naval Aviators. Until early 1962, BNAO was strictly a ground training operation for prospective Naval Aviation Observers who would receive follow on training at a Fleet Replacement Air Group (RAG) in an operational Fleet combat aircraft and would then receive their NAO wings following conclusion of a training syallbus. Evaluating the lack of training aircraft in the BNAO syllabus as in adequate, the school was assigned nine UC-45J "Navigators" and six T-2A "Buckeyes" in February 1962. The T-2As were soon replaced with nine T-1A “Sea Star" aircraft. In 1965, Naval Aviation Observers were re-designated as Naval Flight Officers (NFOs), and in 1968, BNAO School was officially commissioned as Training Squadron TEN (VT-10).

 

By November 1970, Training Squadron TEN had trained over 6,000 student NFOs. In 1971, Training Squadron TEN transitioned to the T-39D “Sabreliner" jet trainer and the TF-9J “Cougar" which was replaced two years later by the newer T-2C “Buckeye."

The squadron doubled in size between 1972 and 1974 to accommodate an increased training requirement, maintaining 40 aircraft: ten T-39Ds and thirty T-2Cs. During the 1970s several flight ground trainers were introduced to the syllabus, including the 1D23 NAV/comm trainer, the 2F90 instrument trainer, and the 2F101 flight simulator. In 1981, a reassignment of aircraft within NATRACOM replaced VT-10's T-2C aircraft with T-2Bs. The squadron revised its training in 1984 and acquired twenty T-34C "Turbo Mentors"; and the Cessna T-47As replaced the T-39Ds in 1985.

 

During 1991, revolutionary changes were made to the NFO syllabus. To improve NFO air sense and situational awareness, forty additional flight hours were placed in the curriculum allowing instruction in basic piloting skills including aerobatics, takeoffs, and landings. The same year, the squadron replaced the T-47A with the T-39N which had upgraded avionics and radar. The T-2Bs and the air combat maneuvering syllabus were transferred to Training Squadron EIGHTY-SIX (VT-86). At the same time VT-10 acquired twenty additional T-34Cs and two new 2B37 instrument trainers for primary and intermediate training.

 

In 1994, the first U.S. Air Force instructors and student navigators (NAVs) reported to Training Squadron TEN under a joint memorandum of agreement between the services. The agreement included the 1996 transition from the T-39N to the Air Force T-1A “Jayhawk" as the training platform for the Intermediate syllabus events. In April 1996, VT-10 split instructor and student assets to assist in the establishment of Training Squadron FOUR (VT-4) as a second NFO/NAV Primary/Intermediate Training Squadron. In 1999 the T-39G/N was re-integrated into the NFO intermediate training syllabus as the training platform for Navy and International Students with the T-1 remaining as the training platform for Air Force and Marine Corps Students. In April 2004 VT-10 flew its last T-39G/N sortie with the T-1 taking over as the primary training platform for all VT-10 student NFO intermediate training syllabus flights. In October 2010, the T-39G/N replaced the T-1 in the NFO intermediate syllabus. On December 3, 2010, VT-4 will be placed in cadre status, and VT-10 will be the sole NFO primary and intermediate training squadron.

 

VT-10 has a 60 member Navy and Marine Corps instructor staff that currently trains over 300 NFOs annually. In 1997, command of VT-10 began alternating between Navy and Air Force Officers.

 

Upon graduation from the Primary or Intermediate phases of flight training, students proceed to follow-on training according to branch of service and ultimate operational aircraft:

 

Navy:

 

VT-86 at NAS Pensacola, FL for EA-6B, EA-18G, and F/A-18F

VP-30 at NAS Jacksonville, FL for P-3C and EP-3

Tinker AFB, OK for E-6B Mercury

VAW-120 at Naval Station Norfolk/Chambers Field, VA for E-2C and E-2D

 

Marine Corps:

 

VT-86 at NAS Pensacola, FL for F/A-18D and EA-6B

 

In January 2003, VT-10 initiated instructor orientation flights in the T-6A “Texan II”, the joint Air Force/Navy platform slated to replace the T-34C “Turbomentor” as the primary phase syllabus trainer. The T-6A “Texan II”, is a single engine, two-seat trainer, which is fully aerobatic. It features a pressurized cockpit, a G-tolerance enhancement system and dual zero-zero ejection seats. The T-6A utilizes a state-of-the-art digital cockpit, to help familiarize students with what they will encounter in their fleet tours.

 

In August 2003, VT-10 marked its first training flight in the T-6A Texan II. The first student class consisted of 4 Navy, 1 Marine and 1 Air Force students who received over 180 hours of academic training, 27 hours of simulator training, and 60 hours of actual flight time.

 

In April 2005, VT-10 completed the transition to the T-6 and flew its last T-34C “Turbomentor” student sortie. VT-10 conducted two detachments to Key West NAS, one detachment to Randolph AFB, TX, as well as two separate hurricane evacuations when hurricanes Dennis and Katrina made landfall on the Gulf Coast. The squadron implemented the Joint Primary Aircraft Training System (JPATS) format for training and rewrote T-6A course-ware to reflect the first major change in Naval Aviation grading philosophy in a generation; the Multi-Service Navigator Training System (MNTS)” (Ref. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VT-10).

 

“In 1960, Training Squadron TEN (VT-10) was established as a division of the Training Department of NAS Pensacola and was known as the Basic Naval Aviation Officers (BNAO) School. It was strictly a ground training operation until the school was assigned nine UC-45J "Navigators" and six T-2A "Buckeyes" in February 1962. The T-2As were soon replaced with nine T-1A “Sea Star" aircraft. In 1965, Naval Aviation Observers were re-designated as Naval Flight Officers (NFOs) and in 1968, BNAO School was officially commissioned as VT-10.

 

By November 1970, Training Squadron TEN had trained over 6,000 student NFOs. In 1971, Training Squadron TEN transitioned to the T-39D “Sabreliner" jet trainer and the TF-9J “Cougar" which was replaced two years later by the newer T-2C “Buckeye."

 

The squadron doubled in size between 1972 and 1974 to accommodate an increased training requirement, maintaining 40 aircraft: ten T-39Ds and thirty T-2Cs. During the 1970s several flight ground trainers were introduced to the syllabus, including the 1D23 NAV/comm trainer, the 2F90 instrument trainer, and the 2F101 flight simulator. In 1981, a reassignment of aircraft within NATRACOM replaced VT-10's T-2C aircraft with T-2Bs. The squadron revised its training in 1984 and acquired twenty T-34C "Turbo Mentors". Cessna T-47As replaced the T-39Ds in 1985.

 

During 1991, revolutionary changes were made to the NFO syllabus. To improve NFO air sense and situational awareness, 40 additional flight hours were placed in the curriculum allowing instruction in basic piloting skills including aerobatics, takeoffs and landings. The same year, the squadron replaced the T-47A with the T-39N "Sabreliner" which had upgraded avionics and radar. The T-2Bs and the air combat maneuvering syllabus were transferred to Training Squadron EIGHTY-SIX (VT-86). At the same time, VT-10 acquired 20 additional T-34Cs and 2 new 2B37 instrument trainers for primary and intermediate training.

 

In 1994, the first U.S. Air Force instructors and student navigators (NAVs) reported to Training Squadron TEN under a joint memorandum of agreement between the services. The agreement included the 1996 transition from the T-39N to the Air Force T-1A “Jayhawk" as the training platform for the Intermediate syllabus events. In April 1996, VT-10 split instructor and student assets to assist in the establishment of Training Squadron FOUR (VT-4) as a second NFO/NAV Primary/Intermediate Training Squadron. In 1999 the T-39G/N was re-integrated into the NFO intermediate training syllabus as the training platform for Navy and International students while the T-1 remained the training platform for Air Force and Marine Corps students. In April 2004, VT-10 flew its last T-39G/N sortie with the T-1 taking over as the primary training platform for all VT-10 student NFO intermediate training syllabus flights.

 

In January 2003, VT-10 initiated instructor orientation flights in the T-6A “Texan II”, the joint Air Force/Navy platform slated to replace the T-34C as the Primary phase syllabus trainer. The T-6A “Texan II” is a single engine, two-seat trainer which is fully aerobatic. It features a pressurized cockpit, a G-tolerance enhancement system and dual zero-zero ejection seats. The T-6A utilizes a state-of-the-art digital cockpit to help familiarize students with what they will encounter in their fleet tours.

 

In August 2003, VT-10 marked its first training flight in the T-6A “Texan II”. The first student class consisted of 4 Navy, 1 Marine and 1 Air Force students who received over 180 hours of academic training, 27 hours of simulator training, and 60 hours of actual flight time.

 

In April 2005, VT-10 completed the transition to the T-6A “Texan II” and flew its last T-34C “Turbomentor” student sortie. VT-10 conducted two detachments to NAS Key West, one detachment to Randolph AFB, TX as well as two separate hurricane evacuations when hurricanes Dennis and Katrina made landfall on the Gulf Coast. The squadron implemented the Joint Primary Aircraft Training System (JPATS) format for training and rewrote T-6A courseware to reflect the first major change in Naval Aviation grading philosophy in a generation: the Multi-Service Navigator Training System (MNTS).

 

2006 saw a continued evolution of the T-6A program through the development of hi-fidelity low-level visual simulators. Detachments to Key West, FL; San Antonio, TX and Savannah, GA, were conducted and the squadron transitioned back to permanant facilities as repairs to damage from Hurricane Ivan were completed. The squadron actively supported the Global War on Terrorism through the efforts of four Individual Augmentees assigned to ground units throughout the Southwest Aisa AOR.

 

VT-10 has a 60 member Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps instructor staff that currently trains over 300 NFOs and Air Force Weapon Systems Officers (WSOs) annually. In 1997, command of VT-10 began alternating between Navy and Air Force Officers. VT-10 flies approximately 11,000 hours in the T-6A and 2,400 hours in the T-1A annually.

 

Upon graduation from the Primary or Intermediate phases of flight training, Navy students proceed to follow-on training at either VT-86 (EA-6B, F/A-18F), Randolph AFB, TX (P-3C, EP-3, E-6B) or VAW-120 in Norfolk, VA (E-2C). Marine Corps students receive additional training at VT-86 (F/A-18D/F, EA-6B). Air Force students proceed to VT-86 (F-15E, B-lB).

 

Training Squadron TEN has been awarded five Meritorious Unit Commendations and four Chief of Naval Education and Training “Shore/Technical Training Excellence Awards", the most recent in 2005. “Wildcat" safety initiatives have earned the squadron 21 Chief of Naval Operations Safety Awards including one in 2005. The squadron was awarded the Towers Award for safety in 1978 and the Grampaw Pettibone Safety Award in 2004 and 2005. VT-10's extensive energy conservation efforts and improved efficiency enabled the squadron to receive the 1995, 1996 and 2002 Secretary of the Navy Energy Conservation Awards. In 2005, VT-10 was presented with the VADM Robert Goldthwaite Award for Training Excellence, the squadron's fourth such award. VT-10's resourceful use of “Self Help” to significantly improve facilities resulted in the squadron being awarded the Chief of Naval Operations Bronze Hammer Award for 2000. VT-10 Squadron Augmentation Unit (SAU) received the CNATRA Active Reserve Integration Excellence Award in 2006.

 

VT-10 has and will continue to aggressively meet the challenges of a changing training environment and continues to proudly serve as the “NFOs Gateway to the Fleet” (Ref. https://www.cnatra.navy.mil/tw6/vt10/history.asp).

 

Mission statement

 

FROM: Commanding Officer

TO: All Hands

SUBJ: Training Squadron TEN's Mission

 

Training Squadron TEN’s MISSION is simple: Provide the best foundational training to grow the world’s best Naval Flight.

 

Vision

 

We will lead our students by being the example 24/7 and by upholding our Command’s Philosophy.

 

Mission Focused – Train students so that they can defend fellow Soldiers, Sailors, Marines and Airman and the American way of life.

 

Safety Oriented – Every routine is not routine; Safety awareness must be ever present in staff and student.

 

Integrity Always – Firm adherence to a moral and ethical code is expected by all member’s; staff and student.

 

/s/
V. Reeves
Commander
United States Navy

https://www.cnatra.navy.mil/tw6/vt10/mission.asp

 

“Training Squadron TEN Is known by several names: TRARON 10, VT-10, or simply the WILDCATS. The mission of the squadron is to conduct primary and intermediate training for Naval Flight Officers (NFO) and U.S. Air Force Weapon Systems Officers (WSO). Additionally, the squadron has taken on the responsibility of training international students, including officers from Saudi Arabia, Italy and Germany.

 

Training at VT-10 is conducted in the T-34C Turbo Mentor, the T-39 Sabreliner and the T-1A Jayhawk. After completion of training at VT-10 students go on to VT-86, VAW-120, or Randolph AFB for advanced flight training.

 

Upon completion of the program at VT-10 and the follow on squadrons at advanced, students will undergo further training at their respective RAG / RTU bases. Naval Flight Officers will go on to fly either the S-3 Viking, ES-3 Shadow, EA-6B Prowler, E-6 Mercury,E-2C Hawkeye, P-3 Orion, or the F-14 Tomcat. Air Force WSOs and Navigators will go on to fly either the B-1B Lancer, B-52 Stratofortress, or the F-15E Strike Eagle. Marine WSOs will go on to fly either the EA-6B Prowler, or the F-18 Hornet. German WSOs will fly either the Tornado, or the mighty F-4 Phantom, while the Italian WSOs will fly the Tornado. Saudi Arabian students will all go on to fly the F-15E Strike Eagle.

 

In 1960, Training Squadron TEN (VT-10) was established as a division of the Training Department of NAS Pensacola and was known as the Basic Naval Aviation Officers (BNAO) School. It was strictly a ground training operation until the school was assigned nine UC-45J "Navigators" and six T-2A "Buckeyes" in February 1962. The T-2As were soon replaced with nine T-1A "Sea Star" aircraft. In 1965, Naval Aviation Observers were redesignated as Naval Flight Officers (NFOs); and in 1968, BNAO School was officially commissioned as VT-10.

 

By November 1970, Training Squadron TEN had trained over 6,000 student NFOs. In 1971, Training Squadron TEN transitioned to the T-39D "Sabreliner" jet trainer and the TF-9J "Cougar" which was replaced two years later by the newer T-2C "Buckeye".

 

The squadron doubled in size between 1972 and 1974 to accommodate an increased training requirement, maintaining 40 aircraft: ten T-39Ds and thirty T-2Cs. During the 1970s several flight ground trainers were introduced to the syllabus, including the ID23 NAV/comm trainer, the 2F90 instrument trainer, and the 2F101 flight simulator. In 1981, a reassignment of aircraft within NATRACOM replaced VT-10's T-2C aircraft with T-2Bs. The squadron revised its training in 1984 and acquired twenty T-34C "TurboMentors"; and the Cessna T-47As replaced the T-39Ds in 1985.

 

During 1991, revolutionary changes were made to the NFO syllabus. To improve NFO air sense and situational awareness, forty additional flight hours were placed in the curriculum allowing instruction in basic piloting skills including aerobatics, takeoffs, and landings. The same year, the squadron replaced the T-47A with the T-39N "Sabreliner" which had upgraded avionics and radar. The T-2Bs and the air combat maneuvering syllabus were transferred to Training Squadron EIGHTY-SIX (VT-86). At the same time VT-10 acquired twenty additional T-34Cs and two new 2B37 instrument trainers for primary and intermediate training.

 

In 1994, the first U.S. Air Force instructors and student navigators (NAVs) reported to Training Squadron TEN under a joint memorandum of agreement between the services. The agreement included the 1996 transition from the T-39N to the Air Force T-1A "Jayhawk" as the training platform for the intermediate syllabus events. In April 1996, VT-10 split instructor and student assets to assist in the establishment of Training Squadron FOUR (VT-4) as a second NFO/NAV Primary/Intermediate Training Squadron. VT-10 has an 80 member Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps instructor staff which currently trains over 400 NFOs/NAVs and 50 foreign student navigators annually. In 1997, command of VT-10 began alternating between the Navy and Air Force.

 

Upon graduation from the Primary or Intermediate phases at Training Squadron TEN, Navy students proceed to follow-on training at VT-86 (S-3B, ES-3A, EA-6B, F-14), Randolph AFB, TX (P-3C, EP-3, E-6A) or to VAW-120 in Norfolk, VA (E-2C). Marine Corps students receive additional training at VT-86 (F/A-18D, EA-6B). Air Force students selected for strike training (F-15E, B-1B, B-52) proceed to VT-86, Electronic Warfare Officers (MC-130, AC-130, RD-135, B-52) proceed to Corry Station, and Panel Navigators (C-130, KC-135) receive further training at Randolph AFB, TX.

 

Training Squadron TEN has been awarded five Meritorious Unit Commendations and seven Chief of Naval Education and Training "Shore/Technical Training Excellence Awards", the most recent in 1997. "Wildcat" safety initiatives have earned the squadron thirteen Chief of Naval Operations Safety Awards. The squadron was awarded the Towers Award for safety in 1978. VT-10's extensive energy conservation efforts and improved efficiency enabled the squadron to receive the 1995 and 1996 Secretary of the Navy Energy Conservation Awards” (Ref. http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/vt-10.htm).

 

VT-10
Squadron Logo
BNAO School
Nickname: Wildcats
VT-10 Redesignated: 15JAN68

http://www.vpnavy.com/vt10.html

VT-11
Tail Code: [??]
Name: Saufley's Satans

http://www.vpnavy.com/vt11.html

VT-12

http://www.vpnavy.com/vt12.html

VT-13
Tail Code: [??]
Name: Unknown

http://www.vpnavy.com/vt13.html

VT-14
Tail Code: [??]
Name: Unknown

http://www.vpnavy.com/vt14.html

VT-15
Tail Code: [??]
Name: Unknown

http://www.vpnavy.com/vt15.html

VT-16
Tail Code: [??]
Name: Unknown

http://www.vpnavy.com/vt16.html

VT-19
Name: Fighting Frogs
VT-19 Established: 02AUG71

http://www.vpnavy.com/vt19.html

VT-21
NAS Kingsville, Texas
Tail Code: [3E]
Name: Fighting Redhawks
ATU-202 Established: 00APR51
VT-21 Redesignated: 01MAY60

http://www.vpnavy.com/vt21.html

VT-22
Squadron Logo
Tail Code: [3F]
Name: Golden Eagles
VT-22 Redesignated: 00SEP70
ATU-212 Redesignated: 00JUN55
ATU-200 Redesignated: 20XXX51
ATU-3 Redesignated: 20AUG51
JTTU-1 Redesignated: 00AUG49
ATU-6 Redesignated: 00JUL49
VT-22 Established: 13JUN49

http://www.vpnavy.com/vt22.html

VT-23
Tail Code: [3H]
ATU-222 Established: 00NOV58
VT-23 Redesignated: 01MAY60

http://www.vpnavy.com/vt23.html

VT-24
NAS Chase Field, Beeville, Texas
Tail Code: [3K]
Name: Bobcat
VT-24 Disestablished: 18SEP92

http://www.vpnavy.com/vt24.html

VT-25
NAAS Corry Field, Pensacola, Florida
VT-25 Disestablished: 18SEP92

Training Squadron TWENTY-SEVEN was initially established on July 11, 1951 as Advanced Training Unit-B at Naval Air Station, Corpus Christi. The command moved to Naval Air Station, Kingsville in 1952 and again to Naval Air Station, New Iberia, Louisiana in 1960. It was there the squadron was redesignated VT-27. In July 1964, the "Boomers" were returned to Naval Air Station, Corpus Christi where we continue to be an important member of the community” (Ref. http://www.cnatra.navy.mil/tw4/vt27/history.asp). CNATRA Building

 

“One of just five Navy primary training squadrons, VT-27 is one of two located on the Coastal Bend; we take pride in representing our area and the State of Texas.

 

In 1973, the squadron began a transition to the role of primary training squadron with the arrival on 1 August of the first T-28 Trojan. By 1 October 1973, the last TS-2A, had departed, signifying the end of the advanced training role and the completion of the transition to primary training. In August 1983, the squadron took delivery of the first T-34C Mentor aircraft. Since March 1984, when the last T-28 ever used for naval flight training departed, the T-34C has been the mainstay of the Navy and Marine Corps primary flight training.

 

The "Boomers" average well over 11,000 training missions a year, and more than 70 sorties per training day. Since taking delivery of the T-34C, our safety record sets the standard for excellence in CNATRA. Expected to achieve high levels of production while maintaining the highest standards of safety, VT-27 consistently accomplishes its important mission by producing Navy and Marine Corps pilots of the highest quality for our nation’s defense” (Ref. http://www.cnatra.navy.mil/tw4/vt27/history.asp).

 

“VT-27's mission is to train our future Naval Aviators in Primary Flight Training, Leadership, and Officer Values. We will utilize the following principles to accomplish our mission:

 

Integrity - Adherence to moral and ethical principles

Professionalism - Being an expert at our work

Communication - Interchange of thoughts, opinions, or information

Growth - Never being content; always striving to know more

Training future Naval Aviators is our mission----doing that safely is our policy!” ef. http://www.cnatra.navy.mil/tw4/vt27/mission.asp).

 

“Future Naval Aviators checking into Training Squadron TWENTY-SEVEN are trained in three categories of basic flying skills. These categories are represented by the tri-colored trail left by the speeding boomerang. The red symbolizes the initial familiarization and basic instrument phase; the white for Radio Instruments and Acrobatics; and the blue for Formation and Night Flying. The lightning bolt, which signifies the dynamics of flight training, occupies the central position of the insignia.

In the forefront of Naval Aviation Training, the Boomers, symbolized by the boomerang design which adorns all squadron aircraft, represent a new breed of instructors and students alike. Infused with a new patriotism, these aviators have rededicated themselves to their tasks at hand, training and becoming the best pilots in the world” (Ref. http://www.cnatra.navy.mil/tw4/vt27/patch_history.asp).

 

Home of the "World Famous" VT-27 Boomers.

VT-27


Squadron Logo
ATU-402
VT-27 Redesignated: 01JUL60

http://www.vpnavy.com/vt27.html

VT-28


Squadron Logo
NAS Corpus Christi, Texas
Nickname: Rangers
VC-30
VT-28 Redesignated: 01MAY60

http://www.vpnavy.com/vt28.html

VT-29
NAS Corpus Christi, Texas

http://www.vpnavy.com/vt29.html

VT-30
NAS Corpus Christi, Texas

http://www.vpnavy.com/vt30.html

VT-31


Squadron Logo
NAS Corpus Christi, Texas
ATU-601
VT-31 Redesignated: 01MAY60

http://www.vpnavy.com/vt31.html

VT-35


Squadron Logo
Tail Code: [??]
Name: Stingrays
http://www.www.vpnavy.com/vt35.html

VT-80

http://www.vpnavy.com/vt80.html

VT-86 'SabreHawks' or Training Squadron 86 is an aircraft training squadron of the United States Navy.

 

Training Squadron 86 is known by several names: TRARON EIGHT SIX, VT-86, or simply the Sabrehawks, a name derived from its history of flying the T-39D/G/N Sabreliner and the TA-4J Skyhawk II. The squadron was commissioned on the 5th of June 1972, under the operational control of Commander, Training Air Wing EIGHT (TRAWING 8) at Naval Air Station Glynco, Georgia. The mission of the new squadron was to conduct advanced Naval Flight Officer (NFO) training, which had previously been overseen by Naval Air Technical Training Center (NATTC) Glynco. The training was in four areas: Radar Intercept Officer, Basic Jet Navigation, Airborne Electronic Warfare and Airborne Tactical Data Systems. Training was conducted in aircraft previously assigned to and supported by NATTC Glynco until February 1973, when the squadron accepted 24 T-39 Sabreliner, 20 A-4C Skyhawk, 2 EC-121K Warning Star, and 12 TS-2A Tracker aircraft and approximately 350 enlisted maintenance and support personnel from NATTC and NAS Glynco. After receiving the aircraft and personnel, the squadron’s mission was expanded to include flight support for Air Intercept Control and Ground Controlled Approach training functions.

 

Following a decision to close NAS Glynco and deactivate TRAWING 8, a Sabrehawk detachment was established at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida in March 1974. On 1 June 1974, the squadron commenced flight operations at Naval Air Station Pensacola under operational command of Commander, Training Air Wing SIX (TRAWING 6), training Naval Flight Officers for nearly all carrier-based aircraft.

 

Since its establishment, Training Squadron EIGHT SIX has received numerous awards to include multiple Meritorious Unit Commendations, the Training Effectiveness Award from the Chief of Naval Air Training (CNATRA), the CNATRA Retention Award, the Chief of Naval Operations Safety Award and 26 CNATRA Safety awards for accident-free operations. The squadron later amassed over 310,000 mishap-free flight hours and received the Admiral John H. Towers Safety Award and the Chief of Naval Education and Training (CNET) Shore/Technical Training Excellence Award.

 

In 1994, Training Squadron EIGHT SIX’s role was expanded to include the training of U.S. Air Force Navigators/Combat Systems Officers (CSO) slated for eventual assignment as Weapon Systems Officers (WSO) in fighter and bomber aircraft” (Ref.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VT-86 & https://www.cnatra.navy.mil/tw6/vt86/index.asp).

 

“Additionally, in 1995, the squadron began of training international military officers from Saudi Arabia, Singapore, and Germany.

 

The command has also historically provided training to international students. In 1996, VT-86's responsibilities also entailed training international officer students from Saudi Arabia, Italy, Singapore, and Germany; nearly 200 International Military Trainees have earned their wings through VT-86” (Ref. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VT-86).

 

VT-86 celebrated its 25th anniversary of mishap-free flying on April 8, 2002. Since its inception in June 1972, VT-86 has logged more than 332,000 mishap-free flight hours and has the distinction of maintaining the longest documented accident-free period of any active flying squadron in Naval Aviation history. This flight-hour total and cumulative time without mishaps also represents the longest mishap-free safety record in Naval Air Training Command history. Over the years, VT-86 has also earned twenty-seven Chief of Naval Air Training safety awards for accident-free operations and it also won the Admiral John H. Towers Safety Award in 1995.

 

The 25 years of mishap-free flying 332,000 hours breaks down to more than 1,100 hours per month.

 

Retirement of the T-2C Buckeye, which preceded the T-45, was completed in September 2008 after 51 years of service in training naval aviators and flight officers with its last flight being conducted by VT-86 personnel. The T-45C Goshawk replaced the T-2C as the premier Advanced Naval Flight Officer training platform. 2010 marked the final year of Air Force WSO training by VT-86.

 

Today, VT-86 trains Naval Flight Officers and Navigators/Combat Systems Officers in the U.S. Navy's T-39 Sabreliner and T-45C Goshawk. Retirement of the T-2C Buckeye, which preceded the T-45, was completed in September 2008” (Ref. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VT-86 & https://www.cnatra.navy.mil/tw6/vt86/index.asp).

“Currently the squadron trains over 150 students annually, and to date, has provided the United States military and Allied forces with over 7,300 NFOs, WSOs, and Navigators/Combat Systems Officers for the U.S. Air Force flying various tactical aircraft worldwide” (Ref. https://www.cnatra.navy.mil/tw6/vt86/index.asp).

 

“Today, VT-86's mission is to provide advanced flight instruction to Student Naval Flight Officers (NFO) destined for strike fighter, bomber and electronic warfare aircraft. The squadron syllabus builds on that training previously received in the primary and intermediate NFO training squadrons, with additional emphasis on systems, instrument and radar navigation, radar intercept and attack, high-speed low-level flight, advanced aerial combat maneuvering and advanced communications.

 

Upon completion of VT-86's program, newly-winged NFOs undergo further training at the respective Fleet Replacement Squadrons (FRS) for their new aircraft before reporting to their first operational Fleet squadron. Air Force Navigators/CSOs follow a similar track, reporting to a Replacement Training Unit (RTU) prior to being assigned to an operational fighter or bomber squadron.

 

VT-86 previously trained NFOs for many well-known retired aircraft such as the F-14 Tomcat, F-4 Phantom II, A-6 Intruder, RA-5C Vigilante, RF-4B Phantom II, S-3 Viking, ES-3 Shadow, and the A-3 (whose variants included the KA-3, EKA-3 and EA-3). In addition, VT-86 previously provided training for the still serving E-2 Hawkeye until that mission was assumed by the E-2 Fleet Replacement Squadron” (Ref. https://www.cnatra.navy.mil/tw6/vt86/index.asp).

 

“Upon completion of the program, students will undergo further training at their respective Fleet Replacement Squadron. Naval Flight Officers will go on to fly EA-6B  EA-6B Prowlers or F/A-18F/G -  Super Hornet, Marine Corps F/A-18D Hornet, WSOs will fly EA-6B Prowler; German WSOs will fly Tornados; Saudi Arabian Navigators will fly F-15S Strike Eagles; and Singaporean Navigators will fly F-16 Fighting Falcons or F-15SG Strike Eagles” (Ref. https://www.cnatra.navy.mil/tw6/vt86/index.asp).

 

“German Air Force (Luftwaffe) and German Navy (Deutsche Marine) Navigators/WSOs go on to fly either the Panavia Tornado Interdictor/Strike (IDS) or Electronic Combat/Reconnaissance (ECR) variants, while some Luftwaffe WSOs will also fly the F-4 Phantom II.

 

Italian Air Force Navigators/WSOs go on to fly the Panavia Tornado IDS and ECR variants.

 

Royal Saudi Air Force WSOs go on to fly the F-15S Strike Eagle and the Panavia Tornado IDS and Air Defence (ADV) variants.

 

Republic of Singapore Air Force WSOs currently go on to fly the F-16D Fighting Falcon, but in addition, will also soon fly the F-15SG Strike Eagle” (Ref. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VT-86).

 

VT-86 is staffed by 47 Navy, Marine Corps, and international officers, 11 civilians, and is supported by 14 Associates and 14 Reservists.

 

Since its establishment, VT-86 has received numerous awards to include the Meritorious Unit Citations, the Chief of Naval Air Training (CNATRA) Training Excellence Award, the CNATRA Retention Award, the Chief of Naval Operations Safety Award, 23 CNATRA Safety awards for accident-free operations, the Admiral John H. Towers Safety Award, and the Chief of Naval Education and Training (CNET) Shore/Technical Training Excellence Award” (Ref. https://www.cnatra.navy.mil/tw6/vt86/index.asp).

“Additional instructor pilots, instructor NFOs and instructor CSOs/WSOs augment VT-86 and are sourced from the TRAWING 6 staff, Naval Aviation Schools Command staff, and part-time Navy Reserve pilots and Navy Reserve NFOs embedded in TRAWING 6's and VT-86's respective Reserve Component units. German and Italian Navigator/WSO instructors also support VT-86 training operations, although they are administratively assigned to colocated German Air Force (Luftwaffe) and Italian Air Force training squadrons at NAS Pensacola. With the ever-changing strategy of national defense for the United States and that of its NATO and Allied partners, VT-86 will continue to train Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force and international officers in preparation for flying the world’s most advanced and complex tactical combat aircraft.

 

General information

 

Upon graduation from Basic Student NFO Training at Training Squadron TEN (VT-10) or Training Squadron FOUR (VT-4) at NAS Pensacola, Navy and certain international students selected to fly large land-based aircraft such as the P-3C Orion, EP-3E Aries or the E-6B Mercury TACAMO aircraft will report to Specialized Undergraduate Navigator Training. After graduation from Intermediate NFO Training at VT-4 or VT-10, those Navy students and international selected to fly the E-2C/D Hawkeye will report to Airborne Early Warning Squadron ONE TWENTY (VAW-120) at Naval Station Norfolk/Chambers Field, Virginia. All other students report to VT-86” (Ref. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VT-86).

The squadron's radio callsign is ROKT (Rocket).

Douglas / McDonnell Douglas TA-4J Skyhawk II

T-47A Citation II

T-39D Sabreliner

Lockheed EC-121K Warning Star

Grumman TS-2A Tracker

North American Rockwell T-2 Buckeye

 

Training Squadron EIGHT SIX
Training NFOs, WSOs, and Navigators for the World

 

VT-86

http://www.vpnavy.com/vt86.html

References include List of United States Navy aircraft squadrons at Wikipedia; others and navy web sites all linked hereto.

U. S. Navy/Marine Aircraft

Part I of VIII - CVW, VFA, VMFA, VMA & VMFA(AW)

Part II of VIII - CACCLW, VAW, VAQ & VMAQ

Part III of VIII - VQ, CFLSW & COMFLELOGSUPPWING

Part IV of VIII - TACAMO, FLELOGSUPPRON, CFLSW, VR & Cnic // Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base New Orleans

Part V of VIII - VRC & VS

Part VI of VIII - VFC & CNATRA

Part VII of VIII - Naval Training Aircraft Photos; UAV Squadrons; COMOPTEVFOR, VX / HX - Air Test and Evaluation Squadron, CPRW-2, CPRW-5, CPRW-10, CPRW-11 and VP

Part VIII of VIII – VT

U. S. Navy/Marine Aircraft

Part VIII of VIII - VT

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIER SHIP

HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619