U. S. Navy/Marine Aircraft

Part I of VIII - CVW, VFA, VMFA, VMA & VMFA(AW)

Part II of VIII - CACCLW, VAW, VAQ & VMAQ

Part III of VIII - VQ, CFLSW & COMFLELOGSUPPWING

Part IV of VIII - TACAMO, FLELOGSUPPRON, CFLSW, VR & Cnic // Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base New Orleans

Part V of VIII - VRC & VS

Part VI of VIII - VFC & CNATRA

Part VII of VIII - Naval Training Aircraft Photos; UAV Squadrons; COMOPTEVFOR, VX / HX - Air Test and Evaluation Squadron, CPRW-2, CPRW-5, CPRW-10, CPRW-11 and VP

Part VIII of VIII – VT

 

 

STRATCOMMWING

Wing logo

 

Mission

 

“TACAMO is a Navy Air Wing fully integrated on an Air Force base, carrying out a Navy mission in joint operations. Commander, Strategic Communications Wing One provides operational control and administrative support for Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadrons Three, Four, Seven and various training units. The Navy's TACAMO community provides a survivable communications link between national decision-makers and the country's arsenal of strategic nuclear weapons. In other words, our 16 E-6B Mercury aircraft enable the President of the United States and the Secretary of Defense to directly contact submarines, bombers and missile silos protecting our national security through nuclear deterrence” (Ref. http://www.tacamo.navy.mil/wing/wing_home.html).

 

SCW-1 WEAPONS & TACTICS UNIT

WTU patch

 

MISSION STATEMENT

 

“SCW-1 DET WTU will provide post-FRS training to the Fleet's E-6B squadrons to include graduate level topics in advanced tactics and weapon systems employment; will provide leadership and management for the development and evaluation of E-6B Concept of Operations, readiness and training matrix, and flight syllabus with respect to combat operations and weapon systems performance; and will support the Warfare/Task Force Commander as directed” (Ref. http://www.tacamo.navy.mil/wtu/wtu_home.html).

 

SCW-1 DET FLEET INTRODUCTION TEAM

FIT patch

 

MISSION STATEMENT

 

“To ensure effective, integrated and coordinated no stand-down transitions of E-6B aircraft system modifications to support the Nuclear Command, Control and Communications to the nation's nuclear forces” (Ref. http://www.tacamo.navy.mil/fit/fit_home.html).

 

 

TACAMO

 

File:EC-130Q TACAMO VQ-4 in flight 1984.jpg

A U.S. Navy TACAMO EC-130Q of VQ-4, in 1984.

 

File:US Navy E-6 Mercury.jpg

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:US_Navy_E-6_Mercury.jpg

 

TACAMO is a U.S. military term meaning "Take Charge and Move Out". TACAMO refers to a system of survivable communications links designed to be used in nuclear war to maintain communications between the decision makers (the National Command Authority) and the triad of strategic nuclear weapon delivery systems. Its primary mission is to receive, verify and retransmit Emergency Action Messages (EAMs) to US strategic forces. It does this by maintaining the ability to communicate on virtually every radio frequency band from very low frequency (VLF) up through super high frequency (SHF) using a variety of modulations, encryptions and networks. This airborne communications capability largely replaced the land based Extremely Low Frequencies (ELF) broadcast sites that became vulnerable to nuclear strike.Fleet Air Reconnaissance

 

There are several components to the current TACAMO system. The main part is the airborne portion, the US Navy Strategic Communications Wing One based at Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma which flies three Fleet Air Reconnaissance squadrons (VQ-3, VQ-4 and VQ-7) equipped with Boeing IDS E-6B Mercury TACAMO aircraft. As well as the main base there is a west coast alert base at Travis AFB, California and an east coast alert base at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

 

The acronym was coined in 1961 and the first aircraft modified for TACAMO testing was a Lockheed KC-130 Hercules which in 1962 was fitted with a VLF transmitter and trailing wire antenna to test communications with the fleet ballistic missile submarines” (Ref. Complete History at reference - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TACAMO).

 

“The Naval Air Development Center developed the required technique of 'stalling' the trailing antenna to achieve the long vertical antenna needed” (Ref. Spinardi, Graham (1994). From Polaris to “Trident: the development of US Fleet ballistic missile technology. Cambridge [England]: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-41357-5.& Complete History at reference - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TACAMO).

 

“The VLF system is currently known as VERDIN (VERy low frequency Digital Information Network.) The program was expanded from 1966 using modified C-130s designated Lockheed EC-130G/Q carrying a VLF system built by Collins Radio Company” (Ref. Complete History at reference - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TACAMO).

 

“The first two squadrons were established in 1968: VQ-4 was initially operating from Patuxent River Naval Air Test Center in Maryland and VQ-3 was initially formed at Agana, Guam but later moved to NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii. System known as TACAMO (from 'take charge and move out') has been operationally deployed in 1969. TACAMO consisted of twelve Lockheed EC-130Q aircraft equipped with VLF transmitters using long trailing antennas” (Ref. Spinardi, Graham (1994). From Polaris to “Trident: the development of US Fleet ballistic missile technology. Cambridge [England]: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-41357-5.& Complete History at reference - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TACAMO).

 

“VLF system was repeatedly upgraded to improve signal strength.

 

By 1971 TACAMO IV incorporated a 200 kW transmitter and dual antenna. Actual transmission power and capabilities remain classified. Airborne ELF was tested but considered infeasible. The aircraft were upgraded to the E-6 Mercury beginning in 1990, and the E-6A was upgraded to the dual-role E-6B from 1998.

 

The E-6 aircraft is based on the Boeing 707. The wings and tail were redesigned to meet new wing loading characteristics. The cockpit was copied from the Boeing 737NG commercial airliner, and the landing gear was modified to handle the added weight. Larger fuel tanks were installed and the fuselage was extensively modified to accommodate the 31 antennas, including the trailing wire antenna and reel assembly.[1] After the upgrade to the E-6B, the TACAMO aircraft – with the addition of an Airborne Launch Control System (ALCS) – took over the Looking Glass mission of the USAF.

 

The French Navy operated four Transall C-160H aircraft using the Rockwell/Collins TACAMO gear from the E-6. Squadron was: 01.059 "Bigorre", disbanded in August 2001” (Ref. Complete History at reference - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TACAMO).

 

http://www.vr54.navy.mil

 

VR48                     CFLSW

 

Fleet Logistics Support Squadron—FLELOGSUPPRON

 

Commander Fleet Logistics Support Wing (CFLSW) - Facebook

 

“Fleet Logistics Support squadrons operate Navy unique airlift aircraft on a worldwide basis to provide responsive, flexible, and rapidly deployable air logistics support required to sustain combat operations from the sea. During peacetime, squadrons provide air logistics support for all Navy commands as well as provide continuous quality training for mobilization readiness. Feet Logistics Support squadrons have no counterpart in the Regular Navy. They represent 100% of the Navy’s medium and heavy intra-theater airlift, and operate year-round, around the world providing the critical link between deployed sea going units and air mobility command logistics hubs. VR-1 provides dedicated airlift support to the Office of the Secretary of the Navy, Chief of Naval Operations and Commandant of the Marine Corps. All VR squadrons are from the Navy Reserve” (Ref. List of United States Navy aircraft squadrons - Wikipedia & Navy web site).

 

Transport Squadron/Air Transport Squadron

 
NATS


Fleet Logistics Support Summary Page

 

VR-1

VR-2

VR-3

VR-4

VR-5

VR-6

VR-7

VR-8

VR-9

VR-11

VR-12

VR-13

VR-21

VR-22

VR-23

VR-24

VR-24-F3

VR-30

VR-31

VR-32

VR-40

VR-44

VR-46

VR-48

VR-50

VR-51

VR-52

VR-53

VR-54

VR-55

VR-56

VR-57

VR-58

VR-59

VR-60

VR-60-F1

VR-61

VR-62

VR-62-Y1

VR-64

VR-142

VR-662

VR-663

VR-691

VR-692

VR-701

VR-702

VR-721

VR-722

VR-724

VR-731

VR-734

VR-741

VR-742

VR-743

VR-751

VR-771

VR-772

VR-773

VR-774

VR-801

VR-811

VR-812

VR-813

VR-831

VR-833

VR-834

VR-861

VR-881

VR-911

VR-914

VR-933

VR-934

 

 

 

 

 

 

Present = Reserve

 

Navy – Home / Facebook

Public History Web Site

VR-1 / VR-1

VR-46 / VR-46

VR-48 / VR-48

VR-1 / VR1

Vr1.jpg

Star Lifters

C-20D Gulfstream III jet
C-37B

Reserve
Andrews AFB, Maryland

Comm. 9 Mar. 1942 – Present

VR-46 / VR-46

VR46   http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/53/Vr46.jpg

Eagles

C-9

Reserve
NAS Fort Worth, Texas

[Deactivation scheduled for Summer 2012]

VR-48 / VR-48

Vr48.jpg

Capital Skyliners

C-20G Gulfstream IV

Reserve

Based out of NAF Washington, DC.

Andrews AFB, Maryland

Redesignated "VR-48" 1 Oct. 1980 – Present

VR-51 / VR-51

VR-52 / VR-52 / VR-52

VR-53 / VR-53 /

VR-53

VR-51 / VR-51

Vr51 insig.jpg

Windjammers

C-20G

MCC-20G Gulfstream IV

AS Kaneohe Bay

Comm. 1 June 1957 – Present

VR-52

Vr52.jpg

Taskmasters

C-9

Reserve
NAS Willow Grove

Comm. in June 1972 at Naval Air Station Willow Grove PA.
[Relocated to oint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst AFB, NJ in Mar 2011]

March 2011

Comm. 24 June 1972 – Present

VR-53

Vr53.gif

Capital Express

C-130T

Reserve
Joint Base Andrews AFB, Maryland

Comm. 1 Oct. 1992 –

Present

VR-54 / VR-54 /

VR-54 / VR-54

VR-55 / VR-55

VR-56 / VR-56VR-56

VR-54

Vr54.jpg

Revelers

C-130T

Reserve
NAS/JRB New Orleans

Comm. 1 June 1991 –

Present

VR-55 / VR-55

Vr55.jpg

Minutemen

C-130T

Reserve
NAS Point Mugu, Ca.

Comm. 1 Apr 1976

Present

VR-56

Vr56.jpg

Globemasters

C-9

Reserve
NAS Oceana

NS Norfolk, Virginia

VR-56 Ground Breaking Ceremony - YouTube

Comm. 1 July 1976 –

Present

VR-57 / VR-57

VR-58 / VR-58

VR-59 / VR-59

VR-57

Vr57 insig.jpg

Conquistadors

C-40

Reserve
NAS North Island, California

Comm. 1 Nov. 1977

Present

VR-58 / VR-58

Vr58 insig.jpg

Sunseekers

C-40

Reserve
NAS Jacksonville, Florida

Comm. 1 Nov. 1977

Present

VR-59 / VR-59 / VR-59

Vr59b&w.jpg

Lone Star Express

C-40

Reserve
NAS Fort Worth, Texas

Comm. 1 Oct. 1981 –

Present

VR-61 / VR-61

VR-62 / VR-62

VR-64 / VR-64

VR-61

Vr-61.jpg

Islanders

C-9

Reserve
NAS Whidbey Island, Washington

Comm. 1 Oct. 1982

Present

VR-62 / VR-62

Vr62 insig.jpg

Nomads

C-130T

Reserve
NAS Jacksonville

Comm. 1 July 1985

Present

VR-64 / VR-64

VR-64.jpg

Condors

C-130T

Reserve
NAS Willow Grove

[Relocated to oint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst AFB, NJ in Mar 2011]

Comm. 1 Nov. 1970 – Redesignated VR-64 from VP on 18 Sep. 2004 – Present

NAVY AIR TRANSPORT OPERATIONS - (A Historical Perspective)

Naval Air Reserve VR. The post-WW-II Naval Air Reserve was organized 1 July 1946 with R4D VR mini-squadrons at some 25 of the over 50 initial Naval Air Reserve training sites. These VR aircraft were assigned to and maintained primarily by station active duty personnel with reservists training and flying some missions on the week-ends. With the transition of fleet VR squadrons to the R6Ds (C-118s) the Naval Air Reserve squadrons transitioned from R4Ds to R5Ds (C-54s) in the 1950s. With the termination of Navy MATS participation, C-118s became available and were assigned to the Naval Air Reserve starting in 1964.

The Naval Air Reserve force was reorganized into self sufficient Force Squadrons in 1970. The initial VR C-118 force squadrons were VR-50 NAS Jacksonville, Florida with a detachment at NAS Willow Grove, Pennsylvania, VR-51 NAS Alameda, California with detachments at NAS Whidbey Island, Washington and NAS Glenview, Illinois, and VR-52 at NAS Dallas, Texas with a detachment at NAS Memphis, Tennessee. In 1972, VR-50 moved to NAS Atlanta, Georgia becoming VR-54 with a detachment at NAS New Orleans, Louisiana, VR-52 at NAS Dallas, Texas became VR-53 retaining the NAS Memphis, Tennessee detachment, the former VR-50 NAS Willow Grove, Pennsylvania detachment became VR-52 with detachments at NAF Detroit, Michigan and NAF Andrews, Maryland, VR-51 moved to NAS Whidbey Island, Washington and later to NAS Glenview, Illinois, the prior detachment sites. These squadrons essentially remained intact until the introduction of the C-9Bs into the Naval Air Reserve in 1978. Fleet Tactical Support Wing (now Fleet Logistic Support Wing) was established at NAS New Orleans, Louisiana in 1974 following the consolidation of the Navy Air and Surface Reserve headquarters organizations into the office of the Chief of Naval Reserve at the Naval Support Activity, NAS New Orleans, Louisiana in 1973” (Ref. by RADM Philip W. Smith, USNR (Ret) - with additional updates by PO1 Mark W Felhofer, USN (Ret) (Only VR Related Information Posted Below)..." WebSite: VRC-50 Association http://www.vrc-50.org/ [10NOV2006] - http://www.vpnavy.com/vr52_history.html).

VR-1 was originally commissioned March 9, 1942, shortly after the United States entered WWII. VR-1, the first of 13 VR squadrons established under the Naval Air Transport Service during World War II, was established at Norfolk. By May 1943 Air Transport Squadron 1 (VR-1), based at Norfolk, extended the area of its operations with a flight to Prestwick, Scotland, via Reykjavik, Iceland. This was the first R5D operation in the Naval Air Transport Service. The squadron was retired and re-established as Fleet Logistics Support Wing Detachment, Washington, DC. on 1 October, 1978. The current squadron was established in 1997. Over the years, VR-1 has flown more than 20 different aircraft, and currently flies C-20D Gulfstream III jets. The mission of VR-1 is to provide executive airlift. It has the distinct honor and privilege of having as primary customers; the Secretary of the Navy, Chief of Naval Operations, Commandant of the Marine Corps, the Vice Chiefs, Director of Naval Nuclear Propulsion, and the Office of Legislative Affairs” (Ref. http://www.public.navy.mil/navres/cflsw/Pages/vr1.aspx).

“Shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, a driving need was foreseen by Capt. C.H. "Dutch" Schildhauer for the transport of vital equipment and personnel to various far flung naval commands to keep up with and support the needs of our fighting naval personnel. This would bolster the United States growing ability to stop the spread onaziizsm and the imperialistic desires of the Jap-Naziism and the imperialistic ideas of the Japanese. Plans were formulated to procure the necessary aircraft and personnel to support the plan for the Naval Air Transport Service (NATS). Having no cadre of qualified personnel for such an undertaking, this initial influx of aircraft and equipment was necessarily drawn from the commercial airlines. The first NATS squadron - VR-1 - was commissioned on Mar. 9, 1942 at NAS Norfolk with the DC-3 aircraft designated R4D by the Navy. It's complement consisted of 5 aircraft, 27 Officers, and 150 men. This initial complement grew to a total of 431 aircraft and 13 squadrons whose principal task was delivering vital cargo, personnel, and mail to the fleet and the ground forces in forwared areas in hours, instead of weeks by surface transportation.

In the formative stages, three squadrons were commissioned. These were VR-1 at NAS Norfolk VA. for service across the Atlantic, VR-2 at NAS Alameda CA. serving the West Coast and Pacific area, and VR-3 at NAS Olathe, KS. to join the training centers and supply depots together, linking with their East and West Coast counterparts. These units then began expanding their operations to provide this high speed transportation system access to far flung regions of the world such as Alaska, the Caribbean, and South Pacific including Australia. By the end of 1943 it had expanded to include four wings, ten transport squadrons, and three ferry squadrons. The fleet of aircraft grew to 200 aircraft, including the land based Douglas Skytrain R4D and Skymaster R5D's, and flying boats Martin Mariner JRM and Consolidated Coronados PB2Y.

Seven squadrons had been commissioned by 1943: VR-4 (Maintenance) Oakland CA.; VR-5 (Operational) West Coast and Alaska; VR-6 (Operational) Miami FL; VR-7 (Operational) South America; VR-8 (Operational and Training) Patuxent River MD; VR-10 (Maintenance) Honolulu HI; and VR-11 (Operational) Honolulu TransPacific. In 1944 three more squadrons were added: VR-9 (Maintenance) Olathe KS; VR-12 (Headquarters Squadron) Pacific; and VR-13, (Operational) Manus Island.

In 1944, equiped with the four engined Douglas Skymaster R5D, the Navy squadrons from the far out Pacific were called upon to support the invasion of France. This required a hugh airlift of mine-sweeping equipment to the U.K. The flight crews were drawn from all NATS squadrons. In the Pacific, as the Japanese were driven deeper and deeper back into the Pacific Ocean, a major organizational change was made, with the establishment of NATS as a flag command of the U.S. fleet.

At war's end, NATS personnel numbered 26,000. Officers and men were working around the clock to carry the burden of rush cargo, key military personnel and emergency operations. Aircraft and men were being utilized to their utmost while maintaining a spirit of "can do" that would match any organization of the military” (Ref. http://www.vpnavy.com/vr2_history.html

“The "Eagles" of VR-46 fly the C-9B Skytrain aircraft. Unlike the traditional role of Reserve Forces, the Naval Air Reserve VR community provides continual worldwide air logistics support to the fleet. VR squadrons are in a constant state of readiness, regularly deploying to the Mediterranean and Western Pacific. On Friday, 13 October 2000 at 1354 local, the "Mighty Eagles" of VR-46 completed 25 years and 70,000 hours of mishap free flying” (Ref. http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/vr-46.htm).

Fleet Logistics Support Squadron Four Eight (VR-48) traces its roots to Naval Air Station, Anacostia, providing over four decades of worldwide, around-the-clock logistical support. On 1 October 1980, the squadron was redesignated "VR-48", operating both the C-118B and C131H aircraft under the operational and administrative control of Commander, Fleet Logistics Support Wing. In October of 1992, VR-48 transitioned to the Lockheed C-130T aircraft. One year later, the squadron began another transition phase to the new C-20G (Gulfstream IV) aircraft.

 

VR-48 is one of two operational C-20G squadrons in the United States Navy. The squadron follows its chain of command through Commander, Fleet Logistics Support Wing, Commander Naval Air Reserve Force; Commander, Naval Reserve Force and Chief of Naval Operations. The squadron, since completing its transitional phase, is operationally scheduled by Joint Operational Support Airlift Center (JOSAC) for Continental U.S. flights and by the Navy Air Logistics Office (NALO) while operating overseas.

 

Composed of 28 officers and 118 enlisted personnel, VR-48 operates and maintains its two high-tech aircraft to provide high speed, long range, short notice air logistics support for the fleet. The Gulfstream IV is the premier executive jet in existence today. The aircraft are outfitted with a glass cockpit and computerized flight management system and are capable of speeds in excess of 600 m.p.h. at a cruise ceiling of 45,000 feet. Each C-20G, with a crew of four can carry 26 passengers or 4,500 pounds of cargo non-stop across distances of more than 3,800 miles. These two aircraft are the first of their kind to be outfitted with a cargo door. This military adaptation won high praise at the Farnborough Air Show in Great Britain in September 1996.

 

Since the acceptance of its aircraft in 1994, VR-48 has compiled over 10,000 mishap free flight hours. The squadron has already proven its versatility while supporting a dynamic schedule for Navy and Marine forces around the world. VR-48 continually conducts extensive training programs to ensure the highest degree of proficiency and professionalism among its pilots, aircrew, maintenance, and administrative personnel. As a result, the squadron is supporting increased tasking at home and abroad in support of NALO and JOSAC scheduling demands” (Ref. www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/vr-48.htm).

“The VR-51 "Windjammers" is the naval reserve's newest squadron and flies two C-20G aircraft in support of worldwide fleet operations. In addition to moving thousands of Sailors, Soldiers, Marines and cargo across the globe, the squadron has provided transportation for vital State Department missions and last minute support for a number of dignitaries. VR-51 provides crew swap-outs for C-130 squadrons in the Asian and European theaters, thus keeping the C-130 asset in-theater and significantly increasing payload capacity for 'OCONUS' theaters. The squadron was commissioned in 1997, comprised of 75 naval reservists. As of early 2000 there were 30 active members and 40 selected reserve assigned to VR-51.

 

The C-20G, a modified Gulfstream IV, normally operates with a crew of four and can carry up to 26 passengers, 6,000 pounds of cargo, or combinations of passengers and cargo. The aircraft is capable of moving the fleet's medium payloads within a quick response time. The high-speed, medium-lift, long-range aircraft has been used extensively to support the fleet in regions where suitable airfields for refueling are unavailable or undesirable or where time constraints dictate minimizing fuel stops.

Commander Fleet Logistics Support Wing Detachment Hawaii stood up in December 1994 and was commissioned as a squadron in November 1997. VR-51 flies approximately 3000 flight hours per year, providing worldwide support for the Department of Defense. VR-51 has provided support for numerous Western Pacific and Mediterranean C-130 detachments and has supported UNITAS exercises in Chile and Argentina. Notable missions include flying Under Secretary of Defense Gansler to Singapore, a Congressional delegation to China, and White House staff support visits to several sites in India and Bangladesh. With various squadron assigned missions, the aircrew and command personnel are allowed recreation time in a variety of different locations, ranging from Wake Island to South America to China and more. Other locations include Europe, India, Australia, American Samoa, Singapore, Asia, Africa, Bahrain, Indonesia, Jordan and Vietnam. The "Windjammers" get their name from their unique home in Hawaii and worldwide range of operations out of Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay” (Ref. http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/vr-51.htm).

Fleet Logistics Support Squadron 52 was commissioned in June 1972 at Naval Air Station Willow Grove PA. It operates four C-9B aircraft with 48 Officers and 250 Enlisted personnel. The squadron is under the operational and administrative control of Commander, Fleet Logistic Support Wing, and is a prime example of the “One Navy” concept, where a Reserve Force Squadron is fully integrated into daily fleet and reserve operations. Long at the forefront of Fleet Logistics Support Wing, VR-52 has a proud history of achievement and recognition. Awards include the 1991 CNO Safety Award, the 1992 Noel Davis Award (Battle “E”), and the 1992 Congressman Bill Chappell Award, given annually to the squadron most demonstrating excellence in air logistics support. VR-52 was awarded the 1993 James M. Holcombe Award, recognizing the best maintenance department in the Wing. In January 1994, the squadron was presented the Navy Unit Commendation for support of the Sixth Fleet during Operations Desert Shield/Storm and Provide Comfort. VR-52 received the 1997 COMFLELOGSUPPWING Training Excellence Award and, most recently, the 1998 Congressman Bill Chappell Award.

 

The C9-B is similar to the civilian DC9-30. VR-52 has 4 C9 aircraft, 2 configured as C9-B's and 2 as the slightly larger C9-D's. None of the 4 were originally designed for the Navy. The B models were DC9-30's and the D models were DC9-33's. All 4 were retrofitted with INS and Omega navigational equipment, long range fuel tanks, and side loading cargo doors. State of the art electronic and navigational upgrades are expected in the near future. The engines are Pratt & Whitney JT8D-9A's rated at 14,500 pounds of thrust each. Maximum takeoff weight for the B model is 110,000 pounds and 114,000 for the D's. Cruising altitude can be as high as 37,000 ft.

 

Unlike their civilian counterparts, Navy C9's have worldwide capability thanks to the self contained navigational equipment and almost 2500 nautical mile range. Typically VR-52 has 1 or 2 aircraft stationed either in Atsugi, Japan or Sigonella, Italy supporting Navy operations in the Pacific and Mediterranean theaters. There is no such thing as an average mission. One day the Pacific crew may be picking up VIP's in Hong Kong at the same time that a crew back in the States is carrying part of an Airwing out to the Strike Warfare Center in Fallon, Nevada. The Mediterranean crew might be taking a SEAL team to the south of Greece. The aircraft can even be configured as a hollow tube carrying nothing but cargo or mail” (Ref. http://www.public.navy.mil/navres/cflsw/Pages/VR-52.asp).x

 

“During June 2004, VR-52 provided valuable assistance to PMA-207 in performance of set-up verification procedures for an infrared (IR) signature C-9B test flight evaluation. Utilizing aircraft 160049, installation procedures were verified for installation of an Advanced Range Data System (ARDS) followed by several ground tests of the GPS and TACAN antennas. The support provided by VR-52 streamlined equipment set-up procedures while providing valuable feedback to PMA-207 for a future IR in-flight evaluation.

During November 2004, VR-52 provided additional support to PMA-207 in conducting of Infrared Imaging testing at Patuxent River Maryland utilizing Aircraft 160049. During this evolution, the Taskmasters of VR-52 flew numerous profile flights providing critical flight information to be utilized for design of a future defense against MANPAD (Manual Portable Air Defense) systems. MANPAD systems include portable shoulder launched missiles which could be used by terrorists. Information derived from this exercise was valuable in assessing the in-flight vulnerabilities of the C-9B to the threat of MANPADs. From the data obtained, a determination will then be made whether to outfit C-9B aircraft with devices to counter MANPAD deployment, considering cost and efficacy of such units. This was a very successful visit with completion of all required aircraft profiles providing vital information needed by Naval Air Systems Command C-9 Program Office” (Ref. http://www.vpnavy.com/vr52_history.html).

VR-64, VR-52 Sailors move into new facility

 

“The U.S. Navy Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VR) 64 and 52 moved into their newly built hangar Feb. 10 after working out of hangar 3209, also known as big beige, for the past 11 months.

"It felt like we were sleeping on someone else's couch while we stayed at big beige," said Cmdr. Chip DeWalt,
VR-52 commanding officer. "We are glad to finally be settling into this brand new state-of-the-art-facility."

The squadrons transferred from Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base Willow Grove, N.J., to Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst March 2011 because of the 2005 Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission.

VR-64 is one of 15 Navy
VR squadrons and one of five C-130T Hercules units comprised of active-duty and reserve members entrusted to safely execute effective, responsive C-130 air logistics missions in direct support of the fleet and combatant commanders worldwide.

"Moving into our new facility really completes out relocation process and firmly establishes us as a unit here," said Cmdr. Wayne Gunther,
VR-64 commanding officer.

VR-52 is one of 15 Navy VR squadrons and one of four C-9B Skytrain logistics aircraft units comprising of active-duty and reserve members who provide around-the-clock responsive, flexible and rapidly deployable logistics support required to sustain combat operations at sea.

"This new facility will definitely allow us to complete our daily mission safer and quicker," said DeWalt.

The new facility is comprised of one large hangar bay with multiple new workstations and offices for Sailors from
VR-64 and 52 to complete their similar missions.

"We have more room in each of our work areas now," said Petty Officer 2nd Class James Harris,
VR-64 aviation structural mechanic. "Before we found ourselves sharing a smaller space with at least one other shop or department."

Locker and bathing facilities are also a part of the new facility.

"The new lockers are a welcome change of pace," said Petty Officer 2nd Class Kathryn Patten,
VR-52 administration yeomen. "This facility definitely is more spacious. I feel a lot more comfortable here."

The facility has a few energy efficient qualities including: flushless urinals, heated floors within both hangars and energy-efficient windows to help contain hot or cold air.

"The new hangars are amazing." said Gunther. "We just came from a hangar where it was poorly lit, dingy and short on space for all our equipment and personnel. These new hangars are fully lit, have tons of open space and are kept at a constant 70 degrees with the heated floors, and have ample office space for our Sailors."

Both units are able to complete many of their daily tasks such as maintenance, inspections and even washing of aircraft inside the new hangar.

"A lot of our equipment was still in storage well away from our maintenance workspaces while we were at big beige, due to the limited amount of space," said Gunther. "Our Sailors can now complete their mission more effectively with all their equipment available within the walls of the hangar."

VR-64 and 52 brought over C-130Ts and C-9Bs as well as more than 500 active-duty and reserve Sailors during the transition to the joint base” (Ref. VR-64, VR-52 Sailors move into new facility - Posted 2/24/2012.  Updated 2/24/2012; by Airman 1st Class Dennis Sloan - Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst Public Affairs). http://www.jointbasemdl.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123291284

Fleet Logistics Support Squadron 53 routinely deploys one C-130 aircraft, two five-person aircrews and 11 maintenance personnel for two-to-four weeks in support of operations worldwide. VR-53 detachments based out of NAS Sigonella often support the entire European theater.

 

Due to increased demands of Operation Allied Force, two separate aircrews alternated missions in May 1999 to keep C-130 aircraft flying 24 hours a day. In between, maintenance personnel refueled, conducted routine inspections and repaired malfunctions. Members of Naval Air Reserve squadron VR-53 deployed to Naval Air Station Sigonella, Italy, from April 28 to May 27. VR-53 aircrews returned to the European theater again on June 21 for an additional month of Allied Force operations. VR-53 carried supplies to help establish a Marine F/A-18 squadron in Taszar, Hungary. They transported personnel, aircraft parts, and vehicles throughout various Italian ports. Also, they were a major carrier of mail for the Sailors stationed within the Adriatic Sea.

 

Hours after the terrorist bombing of U.S. embassies in Africa, the Navy’s SIXTH FLEET was tasked by EUCOM to transport 50 Marines of the Fleet Anti-Terrorist Security Team (FAST) from Naples, Italy, to Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Naval Reservists in the Med responded immediately and flew the mission. Providing logistics support for SIXTH Fleet’s EISENHOWER Battle Group were members of Naval Air Reserve squadron VR-53 from NAF Washington, D.C., on Annual Training to man VR-53’s detachment in the Mediterranean. Just before midnight 7 August 1999, the VR-53 Detachment received word from ASCOMED to report to Naples at 0800 the next day. The Reservists worked through the night on phone patches with the State Department to obtain overflight clearances for Ethiopia, Egypt, Kenya and Greece. At the same time, VR-53’s maintenance crew readied the plane that had returned from another mission the previous evening. Flying their C-130 to Naples, VR-53’s crew embarked the Marine FAST team and flew to Tanzania, stopping only to refuel in Cairo, Egypt. The first U.S. military personnel to arrive in Dar es Salaam after the bombing were these 50 Marines and VR-53’s three pilots, two flight engineers, one loadmaster and one flight attendant. Returning from the 22-hour flight evolution, the crew and other Naval Reservists following them on two-week ATs continue to respond to SIXTH Fleet mission requirements” (Ref. http://www.public.navy.mil/navres/cflsw/Pages/VR-53.aspx).

FLELOGSUPPRON FIVE FOUR’s mission is to operate Navy Unique Fleet Essential Airlift aircraft and to provide: responsive, flexible and rapidly deployable air logistics support required to maintain combat operations at sea; peactime air logistics” (Ref. http://www.vr54.navy.mil).

“The VR-55 "Minutemen"

 

Fleet Logistics Support Squadron 55 is a U.S. Navy C-130T squadron that provides 24-hour logistical support to U.S. Naval forces deployed throughout the world.  It's primary theatres of operation include Europe, Southwest Asia, the Middle East, Indian Ocean, Austral-Asia, and Pacific Island regions.

 

VR-55 is comprised of Full Time Support (FTS) and Naval Reservists that seamlessly work together to accomplish worldwide logistical support.  Currently VR-55 operates five C-130T aircraft. On any given day these five aircraft are dispatched globally in support of U.S. Navy operational tasking. In the spring of 2010 VR-55 participated in the Haiti relief effort, transporting supplies to those affected by the disaster.

 

The squadron is located at Naval Air Station Point Mugu which is approximately 45 miles north of Los Angeles, near Oxnard, California.

 

VR-55 is always seeking qualified personnel to join it's ranks.  Positions are currently available for qualified applicants who wish to affiliate with VR-55 and the U.S. Navy Reserve. For more information contact us at VR-55_info@navy.mil or contact your nearest navy reserve recruiter.  More info can be found at the following sites:

www.navyreserve.com and www.npc.navy.mil (FTS)” (Ref. http://www.vr55.navy.mil).

 

“The C-130 mission is to operate from shore installations to provide intra-theater logistics support for all aspects of naval power projection.

 

Primary theaters of operation include the Mediterranean and Europe, Southwest Asia and the Middle East, Indian Oceans and Austral-Asia. Flexibility and rapid response to contingencies around the world are fundamental requirements of today's Navy, and is accomplished by the thorough training of active duty, and selective reserve personnel to maintain maximum readiness to perform assigned tasks and logistics support for fleet units as directed by higher authority” (Ref. http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/vr-55.htm

Fleet Logistics Squadron Five Six (VR-56) provides around-the world logistical support to all branches of our Armed Forces. VR-56 has also been the head of an Executive Transport mission which carries the Secretary of the Navy, the Chief of Naval Operations, and many U.S. Congressional personnel and other VIPs throughout the world. The squadron operates five McDonnell Douglas C-9B "Skytrain II" aircraft. It is the military version of the very popular DC-9 commercial airliner.

 

Fleet Logistics Support Squadron FIVE SIX (VR-56) was established at Naval Air Station, Norfolk, Virginia in July 1975. One year later, in July 1976, VR-56 was commissioned as a Reserve Force Squadron. VR-56 is one of fourteen logistics squadrons in the United States Navy and reports to Commander, Fleet Logistics Support Wing based at NAS JRB Fort Worth, Texas, operationally and administratively. For scheduling, VR-56 reports to Naval Air Logistics Office (NALO) in New Orleans, Louisiana and Joint Operational Support Airlift Central (JOSAC) at Scott Air Force Base, Illinois.

 

VR-56 is composed of active duty and selected reserve personnel and provides around-the-clock worldwide logistics support for the Navy and Marine regular and reserve forces. The squadron operates four McDonnell Douglas C-9B "Skytrain II" aircraft. Each aircraft is normally manned with a crew of six and is capable of carrying 90 passengers or 27,000 pounds of cargo or a combination of both. Since establishment, VR-56 has compiled in excess of 110,000 accident free hours, flown more than 40 million miles, carried over 1.2 million passengers and 30 thousand tons of cargo.

 

Safety, versatility, and dependability are key words in describing the mission of the squadron. Over 220 detachments covering six continents have provided logistics support, trail maintenance, and worldwide path-finding service. Cargo has included everything from endangered species to critical war-fighting material for Operation DESERT STORM. VR-56 was the first squadron on the ground in Beirut after the terrorist attack on the U.S. Marine Barracks in 1983, ferrying vitally needed medical personnel and supplies, and evacuating wounded. More recently, VR-56 aircraft flew several short notice missions into Croatia during Operation PROVIDE PROMISE and Somalia during Operation RESTORE HOPE. This past year the squadron evacuated all U.S. Embassy personnel in Belgrade, Yugoslavia prior to hostilities in that theater. VR-56 also flew several short notice missions around the globe in support of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Secretary of the Navy. The C-9B's sophisticated navigation and communication equipment, coupled with the proven airframe and powerplant, are key elements in the squadron's global reliability” (Ref. http://www.public.navy.mil/navres/cflsw/Pages/VR-56.aspx).

VR-57 CONQUISTADORS

 

“The Conquistadors of VR-57 are part of a team that is entrusted to safely execute responsive, flexible, and rapid deployable C-40 Clipper air logistics support to the Fleet and Combatant Commanders worldwide. Our mission plays a critical role in our country's National Security Strategy. To succeed, we must adapt to ever changing mission requirements as a cohesive team while effectively managing the risks inherent to Naval Aviation” (Ref. http://www.public.navy.mil/navres/cflsw/Pages/VR57CONQUISTADORS.aspx).

Fleet Logistics Support Squadron Five Eight are commited to providing worldwide fleet logistics support , as directed by the Department of Defense, by aggressively supporting the mission, vision and guidance principles of Commander, Naval Air Force Reserve” (Ref. http://www.public.navy.mil/airfor/vr58/Documents/vr58%20history.pdf).

 

FLEET LOGISTICS SUPPORT SQUADRON FIVE EIGHT 1978-2011 Celebrating 33 Years of Excellence.

 

Fleet Logistics Support Squadron Five-Eight (VR-58) was established at NAS Jacksonville, Florida on 1 November 1977. In April 1978, the squadron was commissioned and received its first C-9B aircraft. VR-58 is one of fourteen Navy logistics support squadrons stationed throughout the United States that report directly to Commander, Fleet Logistics Support Wing based at Joint Reserve Base Fort Worth, Texas. As a Naval Air Force Reserve squadron, the "Sunseekers" of VR-58 are comprised of over 250 professionals, both Active Duty personnel and Selected Reservists. The squadron provides seven days a week, around the clock, worldwide logistics support to all Department of Defense agencies” (Ref. http://www.public.navy.mil/airfor/vr58/Documents/vr58%20history.pdf).

 

“In September 1978, an additional two aircraft were received, making the squadron "mission ready." VR-58 is one of several jet transport units in the U. S. Navy Reserves.

 

VR-58 is a Naval Air Reserve Force Squadron composed of active duty and Selected Reserve Personnel providing Seven-day-a-week round the clock, worldwide logistics to support the Navy and Marine Regular and Reserve Forces. The squadron operates four McDonnell Douglas C-9B "Skytrain II" aircraft, named after the dependable and durable R-4D transport of World War II and Berrying Artist fame. Operating at speeds in excess of 500 mph up to altitudes of 35,000 feet, the aircraft is capable of carrying 90 passengers, plus crew of six, up to 28,000 pounds of cargo or combination of both passengers and cargo. The unit's C-9Bs are virtually always ready for flight, primarily due to an on-site Supply Support Center. Squadron missions include logistics support throughout the United States, the Caribbean, Middle East, Mediterranean and Western Pacific in support of NATO Commander Fleet Air Mediterranean (COMFAIRMED) and Commander Fleet Air Western Pacific (COMFAIRWESTPAC)” (Ref. http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/vr-58.htm).

 

“The Sunseekers of VR-58 take pride in their many accomplishments over the years. The squadron received the highest honor for operational readiness in the logistics community by winning the coveted Noel Davis "Battle E" Trophy for the years 2006, 2004, 2000, 1996, 1995, 1985, 1984, 1982 and 1981. VR-58 has also received the following awards: Navy Unit Commendation 31 January to 10 July 1999; CNO Safety Award for 2007, 2006, 2004, 2003, 2000, and 1983; JOSAC Operational Unit of the Year 2001 and 2000; Congressman Bill Chappell Award for 2005, 2004, 2000, 1996, 1994, and 1993 as the outstanding squadron of the Fleet Logistics Support Wing; Commander, Fleet Logistics Support Wing Administrative Excellence Award for 2000; Meritorious Unit Commendation for 1986; National Defense Transportation Association Military Unit Award 1997 and 1996; Commander, Fleet Logistics Support Wing Training Excellence Award 1996; Regional Environmental Stewardship Award 1998; James M. Holcombe Award for Maintenance Excellence 2006, 2004, 1999 and 1995; the Department of Defense and Department of Energy Conservation Award for 2000; and the Commander, Fleet Logistics Support Wing Career Information Program Management Award 2002.

 

The Sunseekers have flown over 150,000 class “A” mishap-free hours during their 32 years of operation and the squadron continues to maintain the highest degree of professionalism and readiness to ensure a quick logistic response to any worldwide requirement” (Ref. http://www.public.navy.mil/airfor/vr58/Documents/vr58%20history.pdf).

 

“Until April 2002, when the unit transitioned to the C-40A "Clipper" aircraft, VR-58 operated four McDonnell Douglas C-9B "Skytrain II" aircraft [on 11 October 1994, the squadron gained an additional C-9B Skytrain aircraft and became a four-aircraft squadron]. The Commanding Officer of VR-58 exercises operational and administrative control of the squadron, reporting directly to Commander, Fleet Logistics Support Wing based at JRB Fort Worth, TX. Operational tasking is scheduled by the Naval Air Logistics Support Office and Joint Operational Scheduling Aircraft Command in the United States; Commander, Fleet Air Mediterranean in the Mediterranean theater, and Commander, Fleet Air Western Pacific in the Western Pacific theater” (Ref. http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/vr-58.htm).

 

“The C-40A can carry 121 passengers, 30,000 lbs. of cargo, or a combination of both. Squadron missions include logistic support flights throughout the United States, Caribbean, Central and South America, Middle East, Europe, Mediterranean and Western Pacific. VR-58 flies support missions for military operations like Northern Watch, Desert Shield/Storm, Provide Comfort, Enduring Freedom, Crescent Wind, Iraqi Freedom, as well as humanitarian missions for Tsunami Relief, US Hurricane Relief and Pakistan Earthquake Relief. In addition, the Sunseekers are often tasked to fly Congressional Delegations and their staffs on worldwide missions.

 

VR-58 conducts extensive training programs to ensure the highest degree of proficiency and professionalism among its pilots, aircrew, maintenance and administrative personnel. This training paid off tremendously during the period of 27 December 1990 to 21 May 1991 when VR-58 became one of four Naval Reserve C-9B squadrons to be mobilized in support of Operations DESERT SHIELD, DESERT STORM and PROVIDE COMFORT. The main group of Personnel was based at Naval Air Facility, Capodichino, Naples, Italy where it maintained two aircraft. One aircraft and 45 personnel were detached to NAS Sigonella, Sicily on a rotation basis. VR-58 provided direct airlift support to U. S. Navy and Marine combat operations in the Red Sea and Persian Gulf by flying 380 missions (2,700 flight hours), transporting over 2.5 million pounds of cargo and 11,000 passengers during this five-month deployment. Although this was the first time any Navy C-9B squadron had been mobilized and a "first" for many squadron members to experience the accelerated Tempos of wartime operations and life away from their homeland, The VR-58 "Sunseekers" completed 106% of assigned missions with an overall aircraft "Fully Mission Capable" rate of 99.5%” (Ref. http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/vr-58.htm).

Fleet Logistics Support Squadron Five Nine / FLELOGSUPPRON FIVE NINE (VR-59), nicknamed The Lone Star Express, is a transport squadron of the Fleet Logistics Support Wing of the United States Navy. It is a reserve unit composed of both active duty and Selected Reserve sailors. The squadron maintains three modified Boeing Next-Generation 737-700C aircraft, designated as the C-40A Clipper” (Ref. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fleet_Logistics_Support_Squadron_Five_Nine).

 

“The Lonestar Express of VR-59 flies the C-9B Skytrain aircraft. The Navy's new C-40A "Clipper" transport is a version of Boeing's next-generation 737-700, the 737-700C, modified with a large cargo door and the strengthened wings and landing gear of the 737-800. The first C-40A was delivered in April 2001 to Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VR) 59, NAS JRB Fort Worth, Texas. Delivery of the first four aircraft to VR-59 was planned for completion by August 2001. The squadron ceased operating C-9s on 01 October 2000 and began transition training. Although limited operations will begin shortly after delivery of the first aircraft, VR-59 will not be fully operational until April 2002. The fifth aircraft, scheduled for completion in June 2002, will go to VR-58, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., along with one of VR-59's Clippers. VRs 59 and 58 will operate three and two aircraft, respectively, until more are procured. Eventually, each squadron will have four C-40As. At that time, a third site will be selected to receive Clippers.

 

In January 2000 a highly successful seventeen day detachment was performed at NAF Atsugi, Japan and the Western Pacific. Tasking was much heavier than a normal WESTPAC with 128 hours being flown, 846 passengers transported and 22,400 lbs of cargo lifted. The aircraft experienced a significant oil leak that required an O-ring replacement. Most of the maintenance required was done between 2300L and 0600L. Two legs of a mission were cancelled via NALO due to this maintenance. VR-57 Westpac Det "K" 28 June-17 July 2000 operational tasking was fairly light. Our first lift was the U.S. Army's Golden Knights parachute team from San Diego to Yokota AB for their performance in the Wings 2000 Atsugi Air Show. The Detachment was based out of Kadena AB for the first four days in theater until NAF Atsugi re-opened following the Air Show. One crew took 65 Marines led by BGen Nash to Iwo Jima for PME (Professional Military Education). A few members of the crew participated in the Marines' trek to the top of Mt. Surabachi and collected sand from the invasion beach” (Ref. http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/vr-59.htm & http://www.public.navy.mil/navres/cflsw/Pages/VR-59.aspx).

Fleet Logistics Support Squadron 61, better known as the VR-61 Islanders, fly four DC-9 transport jets capable of carrying 100 passengers or 20,000 pounds of cargo, or several combinations of both. VR-61's mission is to provide worldwide, around-the-clock air transport of Naval personnel and cargo -- moving people and cargo in support of the fleet, year round, around the world. . VR-61 provides worldwide logistics support to Navy, other Department of Defense and State Department activities around the world. They have permanent detachment sites in Sigonella, Sicily, and Atsugi, Japan, where they provide air logistics to forces in the Mediterranean and European theaters, as well as to East Asia and the Pacific Rim. There are opportunities for both active and reserve personnel. The vast majority of officers are pilots, with a few billets in the Maintenance Department as the Assistant Maintenance Officer and Maintenance Material Control Officer.

 

“Fleet Logistics Support (VR) crews and aircraft—who provide 100% of the Navy’s organic intra-theater airlift support—respond on short notice to meet emerging needs of Fleet operations. VR crews have maintained a continuous presence in the Med for several years with three aircraft [two C-9Bs and one C-130T deployed to Sigonella, Italy] in support of Commander Fleet Air, Mediterranean. In March 1999 COMFAIRMED requested additional C-130T support for Operation Allied Force. Squadrons VR-55 and VR-62 have each deployed an additional C-130T aircraft and crews to the Mediterranean” (Ref. http://www.public.navy.mil/navres/cflsw/Pages/VR-61.aspx).

 

“During the VR-61 WESTPAC Detachment [7 November-21 November 1999] Fleet Logistics Support Squadron 61 DET B flew 4 missions and 59.3 Hours in support of COMFAIRWESTPAC tasking, and two transit missions in excess of 32.0 hours. Operations were conducted from NAF Atsugi into Kadena, Kimhae (ROK), Nagasaki, Manila, Bangkok, Iwakuni, Babelthaup, Darwin, Perth, and Guam. The majority of the tasking was to support routine passenger and cargo movement in theater. One mission, NALO 954 was particularly challenging. The mission required 9000+ of cargo to be transported over water with specific dip clearance routing resulting in very demanding flight planning by the crew. C-H-C riggings and specials on the aircraft were often performed during harsh weather conditions. This was a typical DET with the typical challenges.

 

Fleet Logistics Support Squadron 61 Detachment Echo flew 17 missions and 115.3 hours in support of Commander, Fleet Air Pacific tasking and 4 transit missions of 66.6 hours during the period 18 March through 9 April, 2000. All scheduled missions were completed, transporting a total of 913 passengers and 47,341 pounds of cargo.

 

Fleet Logistics Support Squadron 61 Detachment Foxtrot flew 23 missions, including 3 crew change missions, and 149.9 hours in support of Commander, Fleet Air Mediterranean tasking and 4 transit missions, all 4 being crew change missions, of 69.3 hours during the period 24 April through 12 May 2000. Operations were conducted into Italy, Spain, France, Germany, England, Croatia, Hungary, Greece, Turkey, Malta, and the Ukraine. 27 of 29 scheduled missions were completed, transporting a total of 710 passengers and 165,029 pounds of cargo. The missed missions were due to a mechanical problem with one of the det aircraft.

 

In June 2000 the "Islanders" of Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VR) 61 stationed at NAS Whidbey Island accomplished something few people ever have. They completed a voyage around the world. They did it by traveling in one of the squadron's four Navy DC-9 transport jets on a recent logistics detachment to Bahrain, an island in the Persian Gulf. As the Islanders planned this detachment, they discovered it would take three days to get to their destination, Bahrain, whether they traveled east or west around the planet. To take advantage of time zones and travel with the sun, they chose to head west the whole way. After four days in Guam, the Islanders continued westward to Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia, followed by Phuket, Thailand. Then they spent a night in Diego Garcia, another small atoll in the Indian Ocean. The next day required only one fuel stop in Muscat, Oman, before arriving, ready for Middle East operations in Bahrain.

 

NAVCENT has occasional airlift requirements that are best accomplished by a C-9. For a jet that flies almost 500 miles an hour, the Persian Gulf is a fairly small operating area. Normal missions require as much time transferring cargo and personnel on the ground as it takes to fly from one airfield to another. Fleet Logistics Support Squadron 61 NAVCENT DET G flew three missions in theater between arrival on 29 May 2000 and departure on 04 June 2000. 31 May – 2 pallets of cargo and 14 pax from Bahrain to Thumrait, Oman, then 4 pax to Masiria, Oman. They also belly-loaded an additional pallet of cargo in the fuselage cargo holds, and carried about a pallet of mail in the cabin in the empty seats. 2 June – RON to Mombasa, Kenya, and return the following day with 4 pax and 2 EOD K-9s. This flight was originally scheduled for June 4th, but the DET re-arranged the schedule. 4 June – 2 palates of cargo to Fujairah, UAE. The crew packed an additional pallets worth of cargo in the fuselage cargo holds for this flight. Tasking was limited by delayed arrival in theater, but the fact remains that dedicated C-9 detachments to the Persian Gulf are an inefficient use of limited assets and very expensive on RPN budgets. The AOR is small enough that the average leg is less than 2 hours for a C-9. The demographics of the theater alone make it inefficient for C-9 operations, and the down time resulting from diplomatic clearance complications further diminishes C-9 effectiveness.

 

After completing their missions in the Persian Gulf, the Islanders continued with their westward island hopping on their return home. The first stop was on the Greek island of Crete for fuel, followed by a short hop to Sigonella, Sicily, to pick up passengers and cargo destined for Oceana, Va. With their remaining crew day, they continued on to Prestwick, Scotland, to spend the night.

 

Fleet Logistic Support Squadron 61 Detachment Bravo flew 19 missions and 108.7 hours in support of Commander, Fleet Air Mediterranean tasking and 4 transit missions of 70.8 hours during the period 14 November through 2 December, 2000. Operations were conducted into Italy, Iceland, Untied Kingdom, Spain, Turkey, Malta, Greece, France, Croatia, Macedonia, Albania, and Germany. All scheduled missions were completed, transporting a total of 524 passengers and 116,074 pounds of cargo” (Ref. The mission of VR-62 is to provide rapid response, global air logistics and support to U.S. Maritime Forces. In the early 1990s VR-62 was stationed at NAS South Weymouth, though the squadron subsequently to their present location in NAS Brunswick, ME. Since the beginning of hostilities in the former Republic of Yugoslavia, U.S. Naval Air Reservists have worked to keep the Navy’s Carrier Battle Group and Amphibious Ready Group supplied with ordnance and critical supplies” (Ref. http://www.public.navy.mil/navres/cflsw/Pages/VR-62.aspx).

“The mission of VR-62 is to provide rapid response, global air logistics and support to U.S. Maritime Forces. In the early 1990s VR-62 was stationed at NAS South Weymouth, though the squadron subsequently to their present location in NAS Brunswick, ME. Since the beginning of hostilities in the former Republic of Yugoslavia, U.S. Naval Air Reservists have worked to keep the Navy’s Carrier Battle Group and Amphibious Ready Group supplied with ordnance and critical supplies. Fleet Logistics Support (VR) crews and aircraft—who provide 100% of the Navy’s organic intra-theater airlift support—respond on short notice to meet emerging needs of Fleet operations. VR crews have maintained a continuous presence in the Med for several years with three aircraft [two C-9Bs and one C-130T deployed to Sigonella, Italy] in support of Commander Fleet Air, Mediterranean. In March 1999 COMFAIRMED requested additional C-130T support for Operation Allied Force. Squadrons VR-55 and VR-62 have each deployed an additional C-130T aircraft and crews to the Mediterranean” (Ref. http://www.public.navy.mil/navres/cflsw/Pages/VR-62.aspx).

 

Fleet Logistics Support Squadron 61, better known as the VR-61 Islanders, fly four DC-9 transport jets capable of carrying 100 passengers or 20,000 pounds of cargo, or several combinations of both. VR-61's mission is to provide worldwide, around-the-clock air transport of Naval personnel and cargo -- moving people and cargo in support of the fleet, year round, around the world. . VR-61 provides worldwide logistics support to Navy, other Department of Defense and State Department activities around the world. They have permanent detachment sites in Sigonella, Sicily, and Atsugi, Japan, where they provide air logistics to forces in the Mediterranean and European theaters, as well as to East Asia and the Pacific Rim. There are opportunities for both active and reserve personnel. The vast majority of officers are pilots, with a few billets in the Maintenance Department as the Assistant Maintenance Officer and Maintenance Material Control Officer.

 

During the VR-61 WESTPAC Detachment [7 - 21 November 1999] Fleet Logistics Support Squadron 61 DET B flew 4 missions and 59.3 Hours in support of COMFAIRWESTPAC tasking, and two transit missions in excess of 32.0 hours. Operations were conducted from NAF Atsugi into Kadena, Kimhae (ROK), Nagasaki, Manila, Bangkok, Iwakuni, Babelthaup, Darwin, Perth, and Guam. The majority of the tasking was to support routine passenger and cargo movement in theater. One mission, NALO 954 was particularly challenging. The mission required 9000+ of cargo to be transported over water with specific dip clearance routing resulting in very demanding flight planning by the crew. C-H-C riggings and specials on the aircraft were often performed during harsh weather conditions. This was a typical DET with the typical challenges.

 

Fleet Logistics Support Squadron 61 Detachment Echo flew 17 missions and 115.3 hours in support of Commander, Fleet Air Pacific tasking and 4 transit missions of 66.6 hours during the period 18 March through 9 April, 2000. All scheduled missions were completed, transporting a total of 913 passengers and 47,341 pounds of cargo.

 

Fleet Logistics Support Squadron 61 Detachment Foxtrot flew 23 missions, including 3 crew change missions, and 149.9 hours in support of Commander, Fleet Air Mediterranean tasking and 4 transit missions, all 4 being crew change missions, of 69.3 hours during the period 24 April through 12 May 2000. Operations were conducted into Italy, Spain, France, Germany, England, Croatia, Hungary, Greece, Turkey, Malta, and the Ukraine. 27 of 29 scheduled missions were completed, transporting a total of 710 passengers and 165,029 pounds of cargo. The missed missions were due to a mechanical problem with one of the det aircraft.

 

In June 2000 the "Islanders" of Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VR) 61 stationed at NAS Whidbey Island accomplished something few people ever have. They completed a voyage around the world. They did it by traveling in one of the squadron's four Navy DC-9 transport jets on a recent logistics detachment to Bahrain, an island in the Persian Gulf. As the Islanders planned this detachment, they discovered it would take three days to get to their destination, Bahrain, whether they traveled east or west around the planet. To take advantage of time zones and travel with the sun, they chose to head west the whole way. After four days in Guam, the Islanders continued westward to Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia, followed by Phuket, Thailand. Then they spent a night in Diego Garcia, another small atoll in the Indian Ocean. The next day required only one fuel stop in Muscat, Oman, before arriving, ready for Middle East operations in Bahrain.

 

NAVCENT has occasional airlift requirements that are best accomplished by a C-9. For a jet that flies almost 500 miles an hour, the Persian Gulf is a fairly small operating area. Normal missions require as much time transferring cargo and personnel on the ground as it takes to fly from one airfield to another. Fleet Logistics Support Squadron 61 NAVCENT DET G flew three missions in theater between arrival on 29 May 2000 and departure on 04 June 2000. 31 May - 2 pallets of cargo and 14 pax from Bahrain to Thumrait, Oman, then 4 pax to Masiria, Oman. They also belly-loaded an additional pallet of cargo in the fuselage cargo holds, and carried about a pallet of mail in the cabin in the empty seats. 2 June - RON to Mombasa, Kenya, and return the following day with 4 pax and 2 EOD K-9s. This flight was originally scheduled for June 4th, but the DET re-arranged the schedule. 4 June - 2 palates of cargo to Fujairah, UAE. The crew packed an additional pallets worth of cargo in the fuselage cargo holds for this flight. Tasking was limited by delayed arrival in theater, but the fact remains that dedicated C-9 detachments to the Persian Gulf are an inefficient use of limited assets and very expensive on RPN budgets. The AOR is small enough that the average leg is less than 2 hours for a C-9. The demographics of the theater alone make it inefficient for C-9 operations, and the down time resulting from diplomatic clearance complications further diminishes C-9 effectiveness.

 

After completing their missions in the Persian Gulf, the Islanders continued with their westward island hopping on their return home. The first stop was on the Greek island of Crete for fuel, followed by a short hop to Sigonella, Sicily, to pick up passengers and cargo destined for Oceana, Va. With their remaining crew day, they continued on to Prestwick, Scotland, to spend the night.

 

Fleet Logistic Support Squadron 61 Detachment Bravo flew 19 missions and 108.7 hours in support of Commander, Fleet Air Mediterranean tasking and 4 transit missions of 70.8 hours during the period 14 November through 2 December, 2000. Operations were conducted into Italy, Iceland, Untied Kingdom, Spain, Turkey, Malta, Greece, France, Croatia, Macedonia, Albania, and Germany. All scheduled missions were completed, transporting a total of 524 passengers and 116,074 pounds of cargo” (Ref. http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/vr-61.htm).

“The Condors of VR-64 are part of a team that is entrusted to safely execute effective, responsive C-130 Hercules air logistics missions in direct support of the Fleet and Combatant Commanders worldwide. Our mission is important and it plays a critical role in our country's National Security Strategy. To succeed, we must quickly respond and adapt to ever changing mission requirements as cohesive team while effectively managing the risks inherent to Naval Aviation.

 

Professionalism. Maintain your high level of professionalism at all times. Whether on or off duty, in or out of uniform, be mindful that our actions and decisions reflect on our squadron, our Navy, and our nation. Take pride in every facet of your professionalism including military bearing, effective communication, sound risk management practices and personal accountability. Our Navy Core Values are not simply words that we memorize and recite; they are a way of life and we must choose to live and serve with Honor, Courage, and Commitment every day.

 

Improvement. Embrace change as growth, because with change comes opportuntiy to improve ourselves, our squadron and the way in which we safely and effectively execute our mission. We should not be satisfied with the status quo and must make every effort to foster a culture of continual improvement in our command. While a good squadron accomplishes its mission well, a great squadron executes the mission well and strives to do it even better each and every day.

 

Training. We will mentor, train, and teach at every opportunity. This squadron is made up of dedicated, hard working Sailors who each add value to our team. We must strive to recognize the potential in those we serve with as we take the initiative to help each other” (Ref. http://www.vr64.navy.mil).

References include List of United States Navy aircraft squadrons at Wikipedia; others and navy web sites all linked herto.

 

Cnic // Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base New Orleans

 

JRB gate 2

 

commander navy installations logo

 

Mission and Vision


”To provide a high quality training environment for active duty and reserve components of all branches of the armed services; to reduce redundancy and overhead by developing joint doctrine and operating procedures that create seamless functionality among host and tenant commands in base support and community service programs.

 

History

 

The history of Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base, New Orleans, Louisiana is actually the story of two air stations. The original installation was located on the northern edge of the city of New Orleans on the shores of Lake Ponchartrain. This site was in use from 1941 to 1957 at which time the entire air station was moved to a new site located 15 miles south of New Orleans. The lakefront air station was turned over to the city and is the present site of the University of New Orleans.

 

Command

 

The Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base New Orleans Headquarters is located in building 46 on Russell Avenue next to the base chapel. The commanding officer, executive officer, and command master chief work out of the command suite as do several other primary advisors and administrative program managers.

Safety, legal, comptroller, public affairs, religious affairs, and administration are just a few of the programs that are provided to serve the Sailors, Airmen, Coast Guardsmen, Soldiers, and Marines on the base” (Ref.
http://www.cnic.navy.mil/jrborleans/About/MissionAndVision/index.htm).

 

Tenant Commands


Fleet Logistics Support Squadron 54
Navy Operational Support Center
Strike Fighter Squadron 204
377th Theater Sustainment Command
Marine Air Group 49 DET C
FRC Mid-Atlantic Site New Orleans
159th Fighter Wing LA Air National Guard
Coast Guard Air Station
3rd Battalion 23rd Marines

Navy Band New Orleans
Region Legal Service Office Southeast

 

U. S. Navy/Marine Aircraft

Part I of VIII - CVW, VFA, VMFA, VMA & VMFA(AW)

Part II of VIII - CACCLW, VAW, VAQ & VMAQ

Part III of VIII - VQ, CFLSW & COMFLELOGSUPPWING

Part IV of VIII - TACAMO, FLELOGSUPPRON, CFLSW, VR & Cnic // Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base New Orleans

Part V of VIII - VRC & VS

Part VI of VIII - VFC & CNATRA

Part VII of VIII - Naval Training Aircraft Photos; UAV Squadrons; COMOPTEVFOR, VX / HX - Air Test and Evaluation Squadron, CPRW-2, CPRW-5, CPRW-10, CPRW-11 and VP

Part VIII of VIII – VT

Part IV of VIII - TACAMO, FLELOGSUPPRON, CFLSW, VR & Cnic // Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base New Orleans

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIER SHIP

HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619